party

[Par┬Ěty]

If you have a party, you invite people who will likely get along and like each other. If you join a political party, you choose the one whose members share your views.

...

A part or portion.

Noun
an occasion on which people can assemble for social interaction and entertainment; "he planned a party to celebrate Bastille Day"

Noun
a group of people gathered together for pleasure; "she joined the party after dinner"

Noun
an organization to gain political power; "in 1992 Perot tried to organize a third party at the national level"

Noun
a band of people associated temporarily in some activity; "they organized a party to search for food"; "the company of cooks walked into the kitchen"

Noun
a person involved in legal proceedings; "the party of the first part"

...

Verb
have or participate in a party; "The students were partying all night before the exam"


v.
A part or portion.

v.
A number of persons united in opinion or action, as distinguished from, or opposed to, the rest of a community or association; esp., one of the parts into which a people is divided on questions of public policy.

v.
A part of a larger body of company; a detachment; especially (Mil.), a small body of troops dispatched on special service.

v.
A number of persons invited to a social entertainment; a select company; as, a dinner party; also, the entertainment itself; as, to give a party.

v.
One concerned or interested in an affair; one who takes part with others; a participator; as, he was a party to the plot; a party to the contract.

v.
The plaintiff or the defendant in a lawsuit, whether an individual, a firm, or corporation; a litigant.

v.
Hence, any certain person who is regarded as being opposed or antagonistic to another.

v.
Cause; side; interest.

v.
A person; as, he is a queer party.

v.
Parted or divided, as in the direction or form of one of the ordinaries; as, an escutcheon party per pale.

v.
Partial; favoring one party.

adv.
Partly.


Party

Par"ty , n.; pl. Parties . [F. parti and partie, fr. F. partir to part, divide, L. partire, partiri. See Part, v.] 1. A part or portion. [Obs.] "The most party of the time." Chaucer. 2. A number of persons united in opinion or action, as distinguished from, or opposed to, the rest of a community or association; esp., one of the parts into which a people is divided on questions of public policy.
Win the noble Brutus to our party.
The peace both parties want is like to last.
3. A part of a larger body of company; a detachment; especially (Mil.), a small body of troops dispatched on special service. 4. A number of persons invited to a social entertainment; a select company; as, a dinner party; also, the entertainment itself; as, to give a party. 5. One concerned or interested in an affair; one who takes part with others; a participator; as, he was a party to the plot; a party to the contract. 6. The plaintiff or the defendant in a lawsuit, whether an individual, a firm, or corporation; a litigant.
The cause of both parties shall come before the judges.
7. Hence, any certain person who is regarded as being opposed or antagonistic to another.
It the jury found that the party slain was of English race, it had been adjudged felony.
8. Cause; side; interest.
Have you nothing said Upon this Party 'gainst the Duke of Albany?
9. A person; as, he is a queer party. [Now accounted a vulgarism.] "For several generations, our ancestors largely employed party for person; but this use of the word, when it appeared to be reviving, happened to strike, more particularly, the fancy of the vulgar; and the consequence has been, that the polite have chosen to leave it in their undisputed possession." Fitzed. Hall. Party jury (Law), a jury composed of different parties, as one which is half natives and half foreigners. -- Party man, a partisan. Swift. -- Party spirit, a factious and unreasonable temper, not uncommonly shown by party men. Whately. -- Party verdict, a joint verdict. Shak. -- Party wall. (a) (Arch.) A wall built upon the dividing line between two adjoining properties, usually having half its thickness on each property. (b) (Law) A wall that separates adjoining houses, as in a block or row.

Party

Par"ty, a. [F. parti divided, fr. partir to divide. See Part, v., and cf. Partite.] 1. (Her.) Parted or divided, as in the direction or form of one of the ordinaries; as, an escutcheon party per pale. 2. Partial; favoring one party.
I will be true judge, and not party.
Charter party. See under Charter.

Party

Par"ty, adv. Partly. [Obs.] Chaucer.

A part or portion.

Parted or divided, as in the direction or form of one of the ordinaries; as, an escutcheon party per pale.

Partly.

...

Usage Examples

Big dress, cocktails, party - I love that. It is my work, but my work allow me to have glamour, to wear beautiful and amazing dresses, to go to big ceremonies.

A few years ago I was at a party and this guy threw me over his shoulder, ran across the street, put me in his car, and stuck his tongue in my mouth.

A gun can be dangerous. But a gun can protect you, you can hunt for food with it - you know, the tool itself is a tool. The intention of the party using the tool is a part of the process, right? You know: the knife cuts the steak, stabs the person, saves somebody from danger, cuts somebody out of a car.

And the Republican Party especially associates the market with the idea of progress, goodness, family, and points us toward the mall as an answer to all our personal dreams.

And what do Democrats stand for, if they are so ready to defame concerned citizens as the 'mob' - a word betraying a Marie Antoinette delusion of superiority to ordinary mortals. I thought my party was populist, attentive to the needs and wishes of those outside the power structure. And as a product of the 1960s, I thought the Democratic party was passionately committed to freedom of thought and speech.

'Hello my name is the Republican Party and I got a problem. I'm addicted to spending and big government.' I'd like one of them just to stand up and say that.

Although... the Chief Magistrate must almost of necessity be chosen by a party and stand pledged to its principles and measures, yet in his official action he should not be the President of a party only, but of the whole people of the United States.

At every party there are two kinds of people - those who want to go home and those who don't. The trouble is, they are usually married to each other.

Misspelled Form

party, oparty, 0party, lparty, oarty, 0arty, larty, poarty, p0arty, plarty, pqarty, pwarty, psarty, pzarty, pqrty, pwrty, psrty, pzrty, paqrty, pawrty, pasrty, pazrty, paerty, pa4rty, pa5rty, patrty, pafrty, paety, pa4ty, pa5ty, patty, pafty, parety, par4ty, par5ty, partty, parfty, parrty, par5ty, par6ty, paryty, pargty, parry, par5y, par6y, paryy, pargy, partry, part5y, part6y, partyy, partgy, partty, part6y, part7y, partuy, parthy, partt, part6, part7, partu, parth, partyt, party6, party7, partyu, partyh.

Other Usage Examples

Comrade Deng Xiaoping - along with other party elders - gave the party leadership their firm and full support to put down the political disturbance using forceful measures.

Actually, I don't ever think there will be a men-only team of leadership in the Labour party again. People would look at it and say, 'What? Are there no women in the party to be part of the leadership? Do men want to do it all themselves?' It just won't happen again.

Bad leadership during the past years has cast on our Party the shadow of great and grave burdens.

But my mom was a pianist, and she taught piano out of her house. I was just so excited, being a little kid and having all these other kids come to my house twice a week. I thought it was a big party.

A peace is of the nature of a conquest for then both parties nobly are subdued, and neither party loser.

A leader in the Democratic Party is a boss, in the Republican Party he is a leader.

Compromise makes a good umbrella, but a poor roof it is temporary expedient, often wise in party politics, almost sure to be unwise in statesmanship.

And humility in politics means accepting that one party doesn't have all the answers recognising that working in partnership is progress not treachery.

At a dinner party one should eat wisely but not too well, and talk well but not too wisely.

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