which

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[which]

A compound relative or indefinite pronoun, standing for any one which, whichever, that which, those which, the . . . which, and the like; as, take which you will.

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Of what sort or kind; what; what a; who.


a.
Of what sort or kind; what; what a; who.

a.
A interrogative pronoun, used both substantively and adjectively, and in direct and indirect questions, to ask for, or refer to, an individual person or thing among several of a class; as, which man is it? which woman was it? which is the house? he asked which route he should take; which is best, to live or to die? See the Note under What, pron., 1.

pron.
A relative pronoun, used esp. in referring to an antecedent noun or clause, but sometimes with reference to what is specified or implied in a sentence, or to a following noun or clause (generally involving a reference, however, to something which has preceded). It is used in all numbers and genders, and was formerly used of persons.

pron.
A compound relative or indefinite pronoun, standing for any one which, whichever, that which, those which, the . . . which, and the like; as, take which you will.


Which

Which , pron. [OE. which, whilk, AS. hwilc, hwylc, hwelc, from the root of hw'be who + l'c6c body; hence properly, of what sort or kind; akin to OS. hwilik which, OFries. hwelik, D. welk, G. welch, OHG. wel'c6h, hwel'c6h, Icel. hv'c6l'c6kr, Dan. & Sw. hvilken, Goth. hwileiks, hwleiks; cf. L. qualis. . See Who, and Like, a., and cf. Such.] 1. Of what sort or kind; what; what a; who. [Obs.]
And which they weren and of what degree.
2. A interrogative pronoun, used both substantively and adjectively, and in direct and indirect questions, to ask for, or refer to, an individual person or thing among several of a class; as, which man is it? which woman was it? which is the house? he asked which route he should take; which is best, to live or to die? See the Note under What, pron., 1.
Which of you convinceth me of sin?
3. A relative pronoun, used esp. in referring to an antecedent noun or clause, but sometimes with reference to what is specified or implied in a sentence, or to a following noun or clause (generally involving a reference, however, to something which has preceded). It is used in all numbers and genders, and was formerly used of persons.
And when thou fail'st -- as God forbid the hour! -- Must Edward fall, which peril heaven forfend!
God . . . rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made.
Our Father, which art in heaven.
The temple of God is holy, which temple ye are.
4. A compound relative or indefinite pronoun, standing for any one which, whichever, that which, those which, the . . . which, and the like; as, take which you will. &hand; The which was formerly often used for which. The expressions which that, which as, were also sometimes used by way of emphasis.
Do not they blaspheme that worthy name by the which ye are called?
&hand; Which, referring to a series of preceding sentences, or members of a sentence, may have all joined to it adjectively. "All which, as a method of a proclamation, is very convenient." Carlyle.

Of what sort or kind; what; what a; who.

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Usage Examples

'Aladdin' was probably my favorite Disney animation when I was a kid. The animation was great and Robin Williams was unbelievable as the Genie. 'Aladdin' was an amazing adventure and the lead character was a hero for guys, which I loved. It wasn't a princess or a girl beating the odds it was a street rat. That seemed really cool to me.

A canon is antithetical to everything the New York art world has been about for the past 40 years, during which we went from being the center of the art world to being one of many centers.

A country like Belgium, or socialist countries in central Europe spend more money on art education than the United States, which is a really puzzling thought.

'Pure experience' is the name I gave to the immediate flux of life which furnishes the material to our later reflection with its conceptual categories.

A book is the only place in which you can examine a fragile thought without breaking it, or explore an explosive idea without fear it will go off in your face. It is one of the few havens remaining where a man's mind can get both provocation and privacy.

A child's fear is a world whose dark corners are quite unknown to grownup people it has its sky and its abysses, a sky without stars, abysses into which no light can ever penetrate.

'WASP' is the only ethnic term that is in fact a term of class, apart from redneck, which is another word for the same group but who are in the lower social strata, so it's inexplicably tied up with social standing and culture and history in a way that the other hyphenations just are not.

Misspelled Form

which, qwhich, 2which, 3which, ewhich, awhich, swhich, qhich, 2hich, 3hich, ehich, ahich, shich, wqhich, w2hich, w3hich, wehich, wahich, wshich, wghich, wyhich, wuhich, wjhich, wnhich, wgich, wyich, wuich, wjich, wnich, whgich, whyich, whuich, whjich, whnich, whuich, wh8ich, wh9ich, whoich, whjich, whkich, whuch, wh8ch, wh9ch, whoch, whjch, whkch, whiuch, whi8ch, whi9ch, whioch, whijch, whikch, whixch, whidch, whifch, whivch, whi ch, whixh, whidh, whifh, whivh, whi h, whicxh, whicdh, whicfh, whicvh, whic h, whicgh, whicyh, whicuh, whicjh, whicnh, whicg, whicy, whicu, whicj, whicn, whichg, whichy, whichu, whichj, whichn.

Other Usage Examples

'Peace Train' is a song I wrote, the message of which continues to breeze thunderously through the hearts of millions. There is a powerful need for people to feel that gust of hope rise up again.

A chief event of life is the day in which we have encountered a mind that startled us.

A civilization is built on what is required of men, not on that which is provided for them.

A committee is organic rather than mechanical in its nature: it is not a structure but a plant. It takes root and grows, it flowers, wilts, and dies, scattering the seed from which other committees will bloom in their turn.

'Yes' is a far more potent word than 'no' in American politics. By adopting the positions which animate the political agenda for the other side, one can disarm them and leave them sputtering with nothing to say.

'Charm' - which means the power to effect work without employing brute force - is indispensable to women. Charm is a woman's strength just as strength is a man's charm.

A Church which has lost its memory is in a sad state of senility.

A civilized society is one which tolerates eccentricity to the point of doubtful sanity.

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