company

[Com┬Ěpa*ny]

Company most often implies a group, whether it be a group of people, a unit of firefighters, a small group of soldiers, or a group working for the same business.

...

The state of being a companion or companions; the act of accompaying; fellowship; companionship; society; friendly intercourse.

Noun
an institution created to conduct business; "he only invests in large well-established companies"; "he started the company in his garage"

Noun
a unit of firefighters including their equipment; "a hook-and-ladder company"

Noun
a social gathering of guests or companions; "the house was filled with company when I arrived"

Noun
organization of performers and associated personnel (especially theatrical); "the traveling company all stayed at the same hotel"

Noun
small military unit; usually two or three platoons

...

Noun
crew of a ship including the officers; the whole force or personnel of a ship

Noun
a band of people associated temporarily in some activity; "they organized a party to search for food"; "the company of cooks walked into the kitchen"

Noun
a social or business visitor; "the room was a mess because he hadn''t expected company"

Noun
the state of being with someone; "he missed their company"; "he enjoyed the society of his friends"

Verb
be a companion to somebody


n.
The state of being a companion or companions; the act of accompanying; fellowship; companionship; society; friendly intercourse.

n.
A companion or companions.

n.
An assemblage or association of persons, either permanent or transient.

n.
Guests or visitors, in distinction from the members of a family; as, to invite company to dine.

n.
Society, in general; people assembled for social intercourse.

n.
An association of persons for the purpose of carrying on some enterprise or business; a corporation; a firm; as, the East India Company; an insurance company; a joint-stock company.

n.
Partners in a firm whose names are not mentioned in its style or title; -- often abbreviated in writing; as, Hottinguer & Co.

n.
A subdivision of a regiment of troops under the command of a captain, numbering in the United States (full strength) 100 men.

n.
The crew of a ship, including the officers; as, a whole ship's company.

n.
The body of actors employed in a theater or in the production of a play.

v. t.
To accompany or go with; to be companion to.

v. i.
To associate.

v. i.
To be a gay companion.

v. i.
To have sexual commerce.


Company

Com"pa*ny , n.; pl. Companies . [F. compagnie, fr. OF. compaing. See Companion.] 1. The state of being a companion or companions; the act of accompaying; fellowship; companionship; society; friendly intercourse. Shak.
Evil company doth corrupt good manners.
Brethren, farewell: your company along I will not wish.
2. A companion or companions.
To thee and thy company I bid A hearty welcome.
3. An assemblage or association of persons, either permanent or transient.
Thou shalt meet a company of prophets.
4. Guests or visitors, in distinction from the members of a family; as, to invite company to dine. 5. Society, in general; people assembled for social intercourse.
Nature has left every man a capacity of being agreeable, though not of shining in company.
6. An association of persons for the purpose of carrying on some enterprise or business; a corporation; a firm; as, the East India Company; an insurance company; a joint-stock company. 7. Partners in a firm whose names are not mentioned in its style or title; -- often abbreviated in writing; as, Hottinguer & Co. 8. (Mil.) A subdivision of a regiment of troops under the command of a captain, numbering in the United States (full strength) 100 men. 9. (Naut.) The crew of a ship, including the officers; as, a whole ship's company. 10. The body of actors employed in a theater or in the production of a play. To keep company with. See under Keep, v. t. Syn. -- Assemblage; assembly; society; group; assembly; society; group; circle; crowd; troop; crew; gang; corporation; association; fraternity; guild; partnership; copartnery; union; club; party; gathering.

Company

Com"pa*ny , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Companied ; p. pr. & vb. n. Companying.] To accompany or go with; to be companion to. [Obs.]

Company

Com"pa*ny, v. i. 1. To associate.
Men which have companied with us all the time.
2. To be a gay companion. [Obs.] Spenser. 3. To have sexual commerce. [Obs.] Bp. Hall.

The state of being a companion or companions; the act of accompaying; fellowship; companionship; society; friendly intercourse.

To accompany or go with; to be companion to.

To associate.

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Usage Examples

Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation for it is better to be alone than in bad company.

A man is never completely alone in this world. At the worst, he has the company of a boy, a youth, and by and by a grown man - the one he used to be.

As an editor, I read Charlotte Rogan's amazing debut novel, 'The Lifeboat,' when it was still in manuscript. I read it in one night, and I really wanted my company to publish it, but we lost it to another house. It's such a wonderful combination of beautiful writing and suspenseful storytelling.

A company is only as good as the people it keeps.

A father and two sons run Adelphia. It's a cable company. And they took from that company a billion dollars. A billion. Three people - three people took a billion dollars. What were they gonna do, start their own space program? 'Let's send the monkey to Mars, Dad!'

A company that pays attention to the family unit is a successful company. We don't isolate the family. We don't make rides that say, 'Hey mom, dad, you go sit on the bench.'

A Nicklaus Design golf course is done by the guys in my company that I work with, that have been trained in my vision, and they do what they think I might do. They might come in the office and ask me questions and I'd certainly answer their questions, but I'm not involved in the site visits or anything else.

A company is stronger if it is bound by love rather than by fear.

Misspelled Form

company, xcompany, dcompany, fcompany, vcompany, company, xompany, dompany, fompany, vompany, ompany, cxompany, cdompany, cfompany, cvompany, c ompany, ciompany, c9ompany, c0ompany, cpompany, clompany, cimpany, c9mpany, c0mpany, cpmpany, clmpany, coimpany, co9mpany, co0mpany, copmpany, colmpany, conmpany, cojmpany, cokmpany, co,mpany, co mpany, conpany, cojpany, cokpany, co,pany, co pany, comnpany, comjpany, comkpany, com,pany, com pany, comopany, com0pany, comlpany, comoany, com0any, comlany, compoany, comp0any, complany, compqany, compwany, compsany, compzany, compqny, compwny, compsny, compzny, compaqny, compawny, compasny, compazny, compabny, compahny, compajny, compamny, compa ny, compaby, compahy, compajy, compamy, compa y, companby, companhy, companjy, companmy, compan y, companty, compan6y, compan7y, companuy, companhy, compant, compan6, compan7, companu, companh, companyt, company6, company7, companyu, companyh.

Other Usage Examples

A man has to live with himself, and he should see to it that he always has good company.

A man reserves his true and deepest love not for the species of woman in whose company he finds himself electrified and enkindled, but for that one in whose company he may feel tenderly drowsy.

And the greeter is what sets the tone for this company and I've been on TV a little bit this morning.

And you have a record company behind it, this is a key too, you need people to fight for your records, at least a little bit. So if you have a great song, it's catchy, and you've got a little bit of help, I think that's all you need. But there hasn't been that in music.

And we can see the positive impacts right here at Solyndra. Less than a year ago, we were standing on what was an empty lot.But through the Recovery Act, this company received a loan to expand its operations. This new factory is the result of those loans.

Anyone working for a big company might be skeptical that a large business, or even a strictly online business, can form the same kind of friendly, loyal relationship with customers as a local retailer. I'm saying it's already been done because I lived it.

All business success rests on something labeled a sale, which at least momentarily weds company and customer.

A company can spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on firewalls, intrusion detection systems and encryption and other security technologies, but if an attacker can call one trusted person within the company, and that person complies, and if the attacker gets in, then all that money spent on technology is essentially wasted.

A fairly bright boy is far more intelligent and far better company than the average adult.

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