word

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[Word]

The divine word of God; the second person in the Trinity (incarnate in Jesus)

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The spoken sign of a conception or an idea; an articulate or vocal sound, or a combination of articulate and vocal sounds, uttered by the human voice, and by custom expressing an idea or ideas; a single component part of human speech or language; a constituent part of a sentence; a term; a vocable.

Noun
a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"

Noun
the sacred writings of the Christian religions; "he went to carry the Word to the heathen"

Noun
new information about specific and timely events; "they awaited news of the outcome"

Noun
a secret word or phrase known only to a restricted group; "he forgot the password"

Noun
a brief statement; "he didn''t say a word about it"

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Noun
an exchange of views on some topic; "we had a good discussion"; "we had a word or two about it"

Noun
a verbal command for action; "when I give the word, charge!"

Noun
a promise; "he gave his word"

Noun
the divine word of God; the second person in the Trinity (incarnate in Jesus)

Noun
a word is a string of bits stored in computer memory; "large computers use words up to 64 bits long"

Verb
put into words or an expression; "He formulated his concerns to the board of trustees"


n.
The spoken sign of a conception or an idea; an articulate or vocal sound, or a combination of articulate and vocal sounds, uttered by the human voice, and by custom expressing an idea or ideas; a single component part of human speech or language; a constituent part of a sentence; a term; a vocable.

n.
Hence, the written or printed character, or combination of characters, expressing such a term; as, the words on a page.

n.
Talk; discourse; speech; language.

n.
Account; tidings; message; communication; information; -- used only in the singular.

n.
Signal; order; command; direction.

n.
Language considered as implying the faith or authority of the person who utters it; statement; affirmation; declaration; promise.

n.
Verbal contention; dispute.

n.
A brief remark or observation; an expression; a phrase, clause, or short sentence.

v. i.
To use words, as in discussion; to argue; to dispute.

v. t.
To express in words; to phrase.

v. t.
To ply with words; also, to cause to be by the use of a word or words.

v. t.
To flatter with words; to cajole.


Word

Word , n. [AS. word; akin to OFries. & OS. word, D. woord, G. wort, Icel. or&edh;, Sw. & Dan. ord, Goth. wa'a3rd, OPruss. wirds, Lith. vardas a name, L. verbum a word; or perhaps to Gr. "rh`twr an orator. Cf. Verb.] 1. The spoken sign of a conception or an idea; an articulate or vocal sound, or a combination of articulate and vocal sounds, uttered by the human voice, and by custom expressing an idea or ideas; a single component part of human speech or language; a constituent part of a sentence; a term; a vocable. "A glutton of words." Piers Plowman.
You cram these words into mine ears, against The stomach of my sense.
Amongst men who confound their ideas with words, there must be endless disputes.
2. Hence, the written or printed character, or combination of characters, expressing such a term; as, the words on a page. 3. pl. Talk; discourse; speech; language.
Why should calamity be full of words?
Be thy words severe; Sharp as he merits, but the sword forbear.
4. Account; tidings; message; communication; information; -- used only in the singular.
I pray you . . . bring me word thither How the world goes.
5. Signal; order; command; direction.
Give the word through.
6. Language considered as implying the faith or authority of the person who utters it; statement; affirmation; declaration; promise.
Obey thy parents; keep thy word justly.
I know you brave, and take you at your word.
I desire not the reader should take my word.
7. pl. Verbal contention; dispute.
Some words there grew 'twixt Somerset and me.
8. A brief remark or observation; an expression; a phrase, clause, or short sentence.
All the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.
She said; but at the happy word "he lives," My father stooped, re-fathered, o'er my wound.
There is only one other point on which I offer a word of remark.
By word of mouth, orally; by actual speaking. Boyle. -- Compound word. See under Compound, a. -- Good word, commendation; favorable account. "And gave the harmless fellow a good word." Pope. -- In a word, briefly; to sum up. -- In word, in declaration; in profession. "Let us not love in word, . . . but in deed and in truth." 1 John iii. 8. -- Nuns of the Word Incarnate (R. C. Ch.), an order of nuns founded in France in 1625, and approved in 1638. The order, which also exists in the United States, was instituted for the purpose of doing honor to the "Mystery of the Incarnation of the Son of God." -- The word, ∨ The Word. (Theol.) (a) The gospel message; esp., the Scriptures, as a revelation of God. "Bold to speak the word without fear." Phil. i. 14. (b) The second person in the Trinity before his manifestation in time by the incarnation; among those who reject a Trinity of persons, some one or all of the divine attributes personified. John i. 1. -- To eat one's words, to retract what has been said. -- To have the words for, to speak for; to act as spokesman. [Obs.] "Our host hadde the wordes for us all." Chaucer. -- Word blindness (Physiol.), inability to understand printed or written words or symbols, although the person affected may be able to see quite well, speak fluently, and write correctly. Landois & Stirling. -- Word deafness (Physiol.), inability to understand spoken words, though the person affected may hear them and other sounds, and hence is not deaf. -- Word dumbness (Physiol.), inability to express ideas in verbal language, though the power of speech is unimpaired. -- Word for word, in the exact words; verbatim; literally; exactly; as, to repeat anything word for word. -- Word painting, the act of describing an object fully and vividly by words only, so as to present it clearly to the mind, as if in a picture. -- Word picture, an accurate and vivid description, which presents an object clearly to the mind, as if in a picture. -- Word square, a series of words so arranged that they can be read vertically and horizontally with like results. Syn. -- See Term.

Word

Word, v. i. To use words, as in discussion; to argue; to dispute. [R.]

Word

Word, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Worded; p. pr. & vb. n. Wording.] 1. To express in words; to phrase.
The apology for the king is the same, but worded with greater deference to that great prince.
2. To ply with words; also, to cause to be by the use of a word or words. [Obs.] Howell. 3. To flatter with words; to cajole. [Obs.] Shak. To word it, to bandy words; to dispute. [Obs.] "To word it with a shrew." L'Estrange.

The spoken sign of a conception or an idea; an articulate or vocal sound, or a combination of articulate and vocal sounds, uttered by the human voice, and by custom expressing an idea or ideas; a single component part of human speech or language; a constituent part of a sentence; a term; a vocable.

To use words, as in discussion; to argue; to dispute.

To express in words; to phrase.

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Usage Examples

Always give a word or sign of salute when meeting or passing a friend, or even a stranger, if in a lonely place.

Any education that matters is liberal. All the saving truths, all the healing graces that distinguish a good education from a bad one or a full education from a half empty one are contained in that word.

And in that I cannot send unto you all my businesses in writing, I despatch these present bearers fully informed in all things, to whom it may please you to give faith and credence in what they shall say unto you by word of mouth.

A word does not frighten the man who, in acting, feels no fear.

And what do Democrats stand for, if they are so ready to defame concerned citizens as the 'mob' - a word betraying a Marie Antoinette delusion of superiority to ordinary mortals. I thought my party was populist, attentive to the needs and wishes of those outside the power structure. And as a product of the 1960s, I thought the Democratic party was passionately committed to freedom of thought and speech.

As a boy, I believed freedom for America meant freedom for me. There was a time I believed every word spoken.

A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice.

'WASP' is the only ethnic term that is in fact a term of class, apart from redneck, which is another word for the same group but who are in the lower social strata, so it's inexplicably tied up with social standing and culture and history in a way that the other hyphenations just are not.

Misspelled Form

word, qword, 2word, 3word, eword, aword, sword, qord, 2ord, 3ord, eord, aord, sord, wqord, w2ord, w3ord, weord, waord, wsord, wiord, w9ord, w0ord, wpord, wlord, wird, w9rd, w0rd, wprd, wlrd, woird, wo9rd, wo0rd, woprd, wolrd, woerd, wo4rd, wo5rd, wotrd, wofrd, woed, wo4d, wo5d, wotd, wofd, wored, wor4d, wor5d, wortd, worfd, worsd, wored, worfd, worxd, worcd, wors, wore, worf, worx, worc, words, worde, wordf, wordx, wordc.

Other Usage Examples

And Barack and I were raised with so many of the same values, like you work hard for what you want in life. That your word is your bond that you do what you say you're going to do. That you treat people with dignity and respect, even if you don't know them and even if you don't agree with them.

'Therefore' is a word the poet must not know.

'Yes' is a far more potent word than 'no' in American politics. By adopting the positions which animate the political agenda for the other side, one can disarm them and leave them sputtering with nothing to say.

A word after a word after a word is power.

All human language draws its nature and value from the fact that it both comes from the Word of God and is chosen by God to manifest himself. But this relationship is secret and incomprehensible, beyond the bounds of reason and analysis.

A key to strengthening spiritual muscles and enduring hardship is finding strength in the Word of God.

Americans have been given goals to achieve in Iraq, but not the standards by which to measure progress. And the only assurance Americans have been given that we can reach those goals is to trust the President and his Administration at their word.

Australians are coffee snobs. An influx of Italian immigrants after World War II ensured that - we probably had the word 'cappuccino' about 20 years before America. Cafe culture is really big for Aussies. We like to work hard, but we take our leisure time seriously.

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