whole

...
[Whole]

Something that exists in its entirety is whole. If there are eight slices of pizza and you eat half, you've eaten four of them. If you eat the whole pizza, you've somehow managed to eat all eight slices.

...

Containing the total amount, number, etc.; comprising all the parts; free from deficiency; all; total; entire; as, the whole earth; the whole solar system; the whole army; the whole nation.

Noun
an assemblage of parts that is regarded as a single entity; "how big is that part compared to the whole?"; "the team is a unit"

Noun
all of something including all its component elements or parts; "Europe considered as a whole"; "the whole of American literature"

Adjective
including all components without exception; being one unit or constituting the full amount or extent or duration; complete; "gave his whole attention"; "a whole wardrobe for the tropics"; "the whole hog"; "a whole week"; "the baby cried the whole trip hom

Adjective
(of siblings) having the same parents; "whole brothers and sisters"

Adjective S.
exhibiting or restored to vigorous good health; "hale and hearty"; "whole in mind and body"; "a whole person again"

...

Adverb
to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole'' is often used informally for `wholly''); "he was wholly convinced"; "entirely satisfied with the meal"; "it was completely different from what we expected"; "was completely at fault"; "a total


a.
Containing the total amount, number, etc.; comprising all the parts; free from deficiency; all; total; entire; as, the whole earth; the whole solar system; the whole army; the whole nation.

a.
Complete; entire; not defective or imperfect; not broken or fractured; unimpaired; uninjured; integral; as, a whole orange; the egg is whole; the vessel is whole.

a.
Possessing, or being in a state of, heath and soundness; healthy; sound; well.

n.
The entire thing; the entire assemblage of parts; totality; all of a thing, without defect or exception; a thing complete in itself.

n.
A regular combination of parts; a system.


Whole

Whole , a. [OE. hole, hol, hal, hool, AS. h'bel well, sound, healthy; akin to OFries. & OS. hl, D. heel, G. heil, Icel. heill, Sw. hel whole, Dan. heel, Goth. hails well, sound, OIr. cl augury. Cf. Hale, Hail to greet, Heal to cure, Health, Holy.] 1. Containing the total amount, number, etc.; comprising all the parts; free from deficiency; all; total; entire; as, the whole earth; the whole solar system; the whole army; the whole nation. "On their whole host I flew unarmed." Milton.
The whole race of mankind.
2. Complete; entire; not defective or imperfect; not broken or fractured; unimpaired; uninjured; integral; as, a whole orange; the egg is whole; the vessel is whole.
My life is yet whole in me.
3. Possessing, or being in a state of, heath and soundness; healthy; sound; well.
[She] findeth there her friends hole and sound.
They that be whole need not a physician.
When Sir Lancelot's deadly hurt was whole.
Whole blood. (Law of Descent) See under Blood, n., 2. -- Whole note (Mus.), the note which represents a note of longest duration in common use; a semibreve. -- Whole number (Math.), a number which is not a fraction or mixed number; an integer. Whole snipe (Zo'94l.), the common snipe, as distinguished from the smaller jacksnipe. [Prov. Eng.] Syn. -- All; total; complete; entire; integral; undivided; uninjured; unimpaired; unbroken; healthy. -- Whole, Total, Entire, Complete. When we use the word whole, we refer to a thing as made up of parts, none of which are wanting; as, a whole week; a whole year; the whole creation. When we use the word total, we have reference to all as taken together, and forming a single totality; as, the total amount; the total income. When we speak of a thing as entire, we have no reference to parts at all, but regard the thing as an integer, i. e., continuous or unbroken; as, an entire year; entire prosperity. When we speak of a thing as complete, there is reference to some progress which results in a filling out to some end or object, or a perfected state with no deficiency; as, complete success; a complete victory.
All the whole army stood agazed on him.
One entire and perfect chrysolite.
Lest total darkness should by night regain Her old possession, and extinguish life.
So absolute she seems, And in herself complete.

Whole

Whole , n. 1. The entire thing; the entire assemblage of parts; totality; all of a thing, without defect or exception; a thing complete in itself.
"This not the whole of life to live, Nor all of death to die.
2. A regular combination of parts; a system.
Parts answering parts shall slide into a whole.
Committee of the whole. See under Committee. -- Upon the whole, considering all things; taking everything into account; in view of all the circumstances or conditions. Syn. -- Totality; total; amount; aggregate; gross.

Containing the total amount, number, etc.; comprising all the parts; free from deficiency; all; total; entire; as, the whole earth; the whole solar system; the whole army; the whole nation.

The entire thing; the entire assemblage of parts; totality; all of a thing, without defect or exception; a thing complete in itself.

...

Usage Examples

A man filled with the love of God is not content with blessing his family alone, but ranges through the whole world, anxious to bless the whole human race.

A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.

A formally recognized equality does, however, accord the smaller nations a position which they should be able to use increasingly in the interest of humanity as a whole and in the service of the ideal.

A whole lot of us believers, of all different religions, are ready to turn back the tide of madness by walking together, in both the dark and the light - in other words, through life - registering voters as we go, and keeping the faith.

'Freedom from fear' could be said to sum up the whole philosophy of human rights.

A comedian's body is funny as well as his mind being funny, his whole personage is funny.

A lot of young players don't really know much about the history of the game and a lot of them are missing out on what the game is all about, especially the whole concept of sportsmanship and teamwork.

Misspelled Form

whole, qwhole, 2whole, 3whole, ewhole, awhole, swhole, qhole, 2hole, 3hole, ehole, ahole, shole, wqhole, w2hole, w3hole, wehole, wahole, wshole, wghole, wyhole, wuhole, wjhole, wnhole, wgole, wyole, wuole, wjole, wnole, whgole, whyole, whuole, whjole, whnole, whiole, wh9ole, wh0ole, whpole, whlole, while, wh9le, wh0le, whple, whlle, whoile, who9le, who0le, whople, wholle, whokle, whoole, whople, who:le, whoke, whooe, whope, who:e, wholke, wholoe, wholpe, whol:e, wholwe, whol3e, whol4e, wholre, wholse, wholde, wholw, whol3, whol4, wholr, whols, whold, wholew, whole3, whole4, wholer, wholes, wholed.

Other Usage Examples

A man to carry on a successful business must have imagination. He must see things as in a vision, a dream of the whole thing.

'For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge' took a year to record that's why the playing on it might sound somewhat labored. 'Balance,' on the other hand, was written and recorded in only four months, so the whole process was quicker and more immediate.

A play is much easier to maintain your personal life with because if you're rehearsing, you're working like from 11 to 6 or 11 to 5 and you get to have your whole morning and your whole evening. When you're doing the play, you have all day.

A person isn't who they are during the last conversation you had with them - they're who they've been throughout your whole relationship.

A lot has been written about Tony Perkins and myself and I figured, Let's get it straight. I had a relationship with Tony for two to three years, but those are only threads in the tapestry of my whole life.

A body of work such as Pasteur's is inconceivable in our time: no man would be given a chance to create a whole science. Nowadays a path is scarcely opened up when the crowd begins to pour in.

A generous basic state pension is the least a civilized society should offer those who have worked hard and saved through their whole lives.

A half truth, like half a brick, is always more forcible as an argument than a whole one. It carries better.

Comments


Browse Dictionary