trench

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[Trench]

A trench is a deep and narrow hole, or ditch, in the ground, like the kind soldiers on frontlines might dig to give themselves shelter from the enemy.

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To cut; to form or shape by cutting; to make by incision, hewing, or the like.

Noun
a ditch dug as a fortification having a parapet of the excavated earth

Noun
any long ditch cut in the ground

Noun
a long steep-sided depression in the ocean floor

Verb
dig a trench or trenches; "The National Guardsmen were sent out to trench"

Verb
cut a trench in, as for drainage; "ditch the land to drain it"; "trench the fields"

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Verb
set, plant, or bury in a trench; "trench the fallen soldiers"; "trench the vegetables"

Verb
cut or carve deeply into; "letters trenched into the stone"

Verb
fortify by surrounding with trenches; "He trenched his military camp"

Verb
impinge or infringe upon; "This impinges on my rights as an individual"; "This matter entrenches on other domains"


v. t.
To cut; to form or shape by cutting; to make by incision, hewing, or the like.

v. t.
To fortify by cutting a ditch, and raising a rampart or breastwork with the earth thrown out of the ditch; to intrench.

v. t.
To cut furrows or ditches in; as, to trench land for the purpose of draining it.

v. t.
To dig or cultivate very deeply, usually by digging parallel contiguous trenches in succession, filling each from the next; as, to trench a garden for certain crops.

v. i.
To encroach; to intrench.

v. i.
To have direction; to aim or tend.

v. t.
A long, narrow cut in the earth; a ditch; as, a trench for draining land.

v. t.
An alley; a narrow path or walk cut through woods, shrubbery, or the like.

v. t.
An excavation made during a siege, for the purpose of covering the troops as they advance toward the besieged place. The term includes the parallels and the approaches.


Trench

Trench , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Trenched ; p. pr. & vb. n. Trenching.] [OF. trenchier to cut, F. trancher; akin to Pr. trencar, trenchar, Sp. trinchar, It. trinciare; of uncertain origin.] 1. To cut; to form or shape by cutting; to make by incision, hewing, or the like.
The wide wound that the boar had trenched In his soft flank.
This weak impress of love is as a figure Trenched in ice, which with an hour's heat Dissolves to water, and doth lose its form.
2. (Fort.) To fortify by cutting a ditch, and raising a rampart or breastwork with the earth thrown out of the ditch; to intrench. Pope.
No more shall trenching war channel her fields.
3. To cut furrows or ditches in; as, to trench land for the purpose of draining it. 4. To dig or cultivate very deeply, usually by digging parallel contiguous trenches in succession, filling each from the next; as, to trench a garden for certain crops.

Trench

Trench, v. i. 1. To encroach; to intrench.
Does it not seem as if for a creature to challenge to itself a boundless attribute, were to trench upon the prerogative of the divine nature?
2. To have direction; to aim or tend. [R.] Bacon. To trench at, to make trenches against; to approach by trenches, as a town in besieging it. [Obs.]
Like powerful armies, trenching at a town By slow and silent, but resistless, sap.

Trench

Trench, n. [OE. trenche, F. tranch'82e. See Trench, v. t.] 1. A long, narrow cut in the earth; a ditch; as, a trench for draining land. Mortimer. 2. An alley; a narrow path or walk cut through woods, shrubbery, or the like. [Obs.]
In a trench, forth in the park, goeth she.
3. (Fort.) An excavation made during a siege, for the purpose of covering the troops as they advance toward the besieged place. The term includes the parallels and the approaches. To open the trenches (Mil.), to begin to dig or to form the lines of approach. Trench cavalier (Fort.), an elevation constructed (by a besieger) of gabions, fascines, earth, and the like, about half way up the glacis, in order to discover and enfilade the covered way. -- Trench plow, ∨ Trench plough, a kind of plow for opening land to a greater depth than that of common furrows.

To cut; to form or shape by cutting; to make by incision, hewing, or the like.

To encroach; to intrench.

A long, narrow cut in the earth; a ditch; as, a trench for draining land.

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Usage Examples

The TV business is uglier than most things. It is normally perceived as some kind of cruel and shallow money trench through the heart of the journalism industry, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free and good men die like dogs, for no good reason.

Gradually I became aware of details: a company of French soldiers was marching through the streets of the town. They broke formation, and went in single file along the communication trench leading to the front line. Another group followed them.

I'm a comic book artist. So I think to myself, what do I like to draw? I like to draw hot chicks, fast cars and cool guys in trench coats. So that's what I write about.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

In New York City, you can walk down the street and see a girl in a trench who looks equally as cool as a girl wearing Lululemon. It's like you're watching models. You see a little of everything right by you.

Like all young reporters - brilliant or hopelessly incompetent - I dreamed of the glamorous life of the foreign correspondent: prowling Vienna in a Burberry trench coat, speaking a dozen languages to dangerous women, narrowly escaping Sardinian bandits - the usual stuff that newspaper dreams are made of.

The battle for the mind of Ronald Reagan was like the trench warfare of World War I: never have so many fought so hard for such barren terrain.

I had two family members involved in World War I: two great-uncles. One of them is on a memorial in France. And the other was a trench runner who survived the war. The average life span of a trench runner was 36 hours, but he survived the whole war.

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