thick

...
[thible]

Define thible. thible synonyms, thible pronunciation, thible translation, English dictionary definition of thible. n dialect Northern English a smooth stick for stirring porridge, broth or anything else made in a pot

...

Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; -- said of a solid body; as, a timber seven inches thick.

Noun
the location of something surrounded by other things; "in the midst of the crowd"

Adjective S.
abundantly covered or filled; "the top was thick with dust"

Adjective S.
used informally

Adjective S.
closely crowded together; "a compact shopping center"; "a dense population"; "thick crowds"

Adjective S.
heavy and compact in form or stature; "a wrestler of compact build"; "he was tall and heavyset"; "stocky legs"; "a thick middle-aged man"; "a thickset young man"

...

Adjective S.
abundant; "a thick head of hair"

Adjective S.
spoken as if with a thick tongue; "the thick speech of a drunkard"; "his words were slurred"

Adjective S.
(of darkness) very intense; "thick night"; "thick darkness"; "a face in deep shadow"; "deep night"

Adjective S.
hard to pass through because of dense growth; "dense vegetation"; "thick woods"

Adjective
not thin; of a specific thickness or of relatively great extent from one surface to the opposite usually in the smallest of the three solid dimensions; "an inch thick"; "a thick board"; "a thick sandwich"; "spread a thick layer of butter"; "thick coating

Adjective
relatively dense in consistency; "thick cream"; "thick soup"; "thick smoke"; "thick fog"

Adjective S.
wide from side to side; "a heavy black mark"

Adverb
in quick succession; "misfortunes come fast and thick"

Adverb
with a thick consistency; "the blood was flowing thick"


superl.
Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; -- said of a solid body; as, a timber seven inches thick.

superl.
Having more depth or extent from one surface to its opposite than usual; not thin or slender; as, a thick plank; thick cloth; thick paper; thick neck.

superl.
Dense; not thin; inspissated; as, thick vapors. Also used figuratively; as, thick darkness.

superl.
Not transparent or clear; hence, turbid, muddy, or misty; as, the water of a river is apt to be thick after a rain.

superl.
Abundant, close, or crowded in space; closely set; following in quick succession; frequently recurring.

superl.
Not having due distinction of syllables, or good articulation; indistinct; as, a thick utterance.

superl.
Deep; profound; as, thick sleep.

superl.
Dull; not quick; as, thick of fearing.

superl.
Intimate; very friendly; familiar.

n.
The thickest part, or the time when anything is thickest.

n.
A thicket; as, gloomy thicks.

adv.
Frequently; fast; quick.

adv.
Closely; as, a plat of ground thick sown.

adv.
To a great depth, or to a greater depth than usual; as, land covered thick with manure.

v. t. & i.
To thicken.


Thick

Thick , a. [Compar. Thicker ; superl. Thickest.] [OE. thicke, AS. icce; akin to D. dik, OS. thikki, OHG. dicchi thick, dense, G. dick thick, Icel. ykkr, j'94kkr, and probably to Gael. & Ir. tiugh. Cf. Tight.] 1. Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; -- said of a solid body; as, a timber seven inches thick.
Were it as thick as is a branched oak.
My little finger shall be thicker than my father's loins.
2. Having more depth or extent from one surface to its opposite than usual; not thin or slender; as, a thick plank; thick cloth; thick paper; thick neck. 3. Dense; not thin; inspissated; as, thick vapors. Also used figuratively; as, thick darkness.
Make the gruel thick and slab.
4. Not transparent or clear; hence, turbid, muddy, or misty; as, the water of a river is apt to be thick after a rain. "In a thick, misty day." Sir W. Scott. 5. Abundant, close, or crowded in space; closely set; following in quick succession; frequently recurring.
The people were gathered thick together.
Black was the forest; thick with beech it stood.
6. Not having due distinction of syllables, or good articulation; indistinct; as, a thick utterance. 7. Deep; profound; as, thick sleep. [R.] Shak. 8. Dull; not quick; as, thick of fearing. Shak.
His dimensions to any thick sight were invincible.
9. Intimate; very friendly; familiar. [Colloq.]
We have been thick ever since.
&hand; Thick is often used in the formation of compounds, most of which are self-explaining; as, thick-barred, thick-bodied, thick-coming, thick-cut, thick-flying, thick-growing, thick-leaved, thick-lipped, thick-necked, thick-planted, thick-ribbed, thick-shelled, thick-woven, and the like. Thick register. (Phon.) See the Note under Register, n., 7. -- Thick stuff (Naut.), all plank that is more than four inches thick and less than twelve. J. Knowles. Syn. -- Dense; close; compact; solid; gross; coarse.

Thick

Thick, n. 1. The thickest part, or the time when anything is thickest.
In the thick of the dust and smoke.
2. A thicket; as, gloomy thicks. [Obs.] Drayton.
Through the thick they heard one rudely rush.
He through a little window cast his sight Through thick of bars, that gave a scanty light.
Thick-and-thin block (Naut.), a fiddle block. See under Fiddle. -- Through thick and thin, through all obstacles and difficulties, both great and small.
Through thick and thin she followed him.
He became the panegyrist, through thick and thin, of a military frenzy.

Thick

Thick , adv. [AS. þicce.] 1. Frequently; fast; quick. 2. Closely; as, a plat of ground thick sown. 3. To a great depth, or to a greater depth than usual; as, land covered thick with manure. Thick and threefold, in quick succession, or in great numbers. [Obs.] L'Estrange.

Thick

Thick, v. t. & i. [Cf. AS. iccian.] To thicken. [R.]
The nightmare Life-in-death was she, Who thicks man's blood with cold.

Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; -- said of a solid body; as, a timber seven inches thick.

The thickest part, or the time when anything is thickest.

Frequently; fast; quick.

To thicken.

...

Usage Examples

A few years back, when my style was 'punk grandma,' I picked up an amazing pair of sandals - orthopaedic ones, with really thick soles. I've given them away to a friend now, because these days my look is more '1980s substitute teacher gone wild.'

I love Prince Harry. Good looking and a bit of a rebel. Me and his dad are as thick as thieves and I knew Harry before I knew his dad so we've met a few times. I think he's amazing. And I think you can relate to him because he's made mistakes. He's cool.

It's amazing that something only an atom thick can be an impenetrable barrier. You can have gas on one side and vacuum or liquid on the other, and with a wall only one atom thick, nothing would go through it.

In this business you have to develop a thick skin, but I'm always going to feel everything. It's my nature.

I have pretty thick skin, and I think if you're going to be in this business, if you're going to be an actor or a writer, you better have a thick skin.

Everything officers go through in any chase anywhere in the country, but amped up 100 times! I'm right in the thick of things in a car going like 80 miles an hour, and doing 360s in the middle of the road. It was a wild ride.

I've just got crap hair. Although I inherited a lot of stuff from my dad, including giant knees, I didn't get his good, thick hair. I got my mother's thin, wispy, non-event hair instead.

Misspelled Form

thick, rthick, 5thick, 6thick, ythick, gthick, rhick, 5hick, 6hick, yhick, ghick, trhick, t5hick, t6hick, tyhick, tghick, tghick, tyhick, tuhick, tjhick, tnhick, tgick, tyick, tuick, tjick, tnick, thgick, thyick, thuick, thjick, thnick, thuick, th8ick, th9ick, thoick, thjick, thkick, thuck, th8ck, th9ck, thock, thjck, thkck, thiuck, thi8ck, thi9ck, thiock, thijck, thikck, thixck, thidck, thifck, thivck, thi ck, thixk, thidk, thifk, thivk, thi k, thicxk, thicdk, thicfk, thicvk, thic k, thicjk, thicik, thicok, thiclk, thicmk, thicj, thici, thico, thicl, thicm, thickj, thicki, thicko, thickl, thickm.

Other Usage Examples

Experience, already reduced to a group of impressions, is ringed round for each one of us by that thick wall of personality through which no real voice has ever pierced on its way to us, or from us to that which we can only conjecture to be without.

The stones themselves are thick with history, and those cats that dash through the alleyways must surely be the ghosts of the famous dead in feline disguise.

A thick skin is a gift from God.

I often have said that to be a college president, you need a thick skin, a good sense of humor, and nerves like sewer pipes.

A human being has so many skins inside, covering the depths of the heart. We know so many things, but we don't know ourselves! Why, thirty or forty skins or hides, as thick and hard as an ox's or bear's, cover the soul. Go into your own ground and learn to know yourself there.

I do believe that there are African Americans who have thick accents. My mom has a thick accent my relatives have thick accents. But sometimes you have to adjust when you go into the world of film, TV, theatre, in order to make it accessible to people.

Death used to announce itself in the thick of life but now people drag on so long it sometimes seems that we are reaching the stage when we may have to announce ourselves to death. It is as though one needs a special strength to die, and not a final weakness.

A lesser complaint: hair extensions. There are moments on 'All My Children' when half the women actors, young and old, seem to be afflicted by android Barbie creep. All those thick swatches of lifeless strands clustering lankly round ladies' necks! Like orange tanning spray, this is a fashion fad that should be put out of its misery.

Comments


Browse Dictionary