sum

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[Sum]

When you determine the sum, you add up all the numbers. When you sum something up, you focus on all of its important points.

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The aggregate of two or more numbers, magnitudes, quantities, or particulars; the amount or whole of any number of individuals or particulars added together; as, the sum of 5 and 7 is 12.

Noun
the whole amount

Noun
a quantity obtained by addition

Noun
the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience; "the gist of the prosecutor''s argument"; "the heart and soul of the Republican Party"; "the nub of the story"

Noun
the final aggregate; "the sum of all our troubles did not equal the misery they suffered"

Noun
a set containing all and only the members of two or more given sets; "let C be the union of the sets A and B"

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Noun
a quantity of money; "he borrowed a large sum"; "the amount he had in cash was insufficient"

Noun
the basic unit of money in Uzbekistan

Verb
determine the sum of; "Add all the people in this town to those of the neighboring town"

Verb
be a summary of; "The abstract summarizes the main ideas in the paper"


n.
The aggregate of two or more numbers, magnitudes, quantities, or particulars; the amount or whole of any number of individuals or particulars added together; as, the sum of 5 and 7 is 12.

n.
A quantity of money or currency; any amount, indefinitely; as, a sum of money; a small sum, or a large sum.

n.
The principal points or thoughts when viewed together; the amount; the substance; compendium; as, this is the sum of all the evidence in the case; this is the sum and substance of his objections.

n.
Height; completion; utmost degree.

n.
A problem to be solved, or an example to be wrought out.

v. t.
To bring together into one whole; to collect into one amount; to cast up, as a column of figures; to ascertain the totality of; -- usually with up.

v. t.
To bring or collect into a small compass; to comprise in a few words; to condense; -- usually with up.

v. t.
To have (the feathers) full grown; to furnish with complete, or full-grown, plumage.


Sum

Sum , n. [OE. summe, somme, OF. sume, some, F. somme, L. summa, fr. summus highest, a superlative from sub under. See Sub-, and cf. Supreme.] 1. The aggregate of two or more numbers, magnitudes, quantities, or particulars; the amount or whole of any number of individuals or particulars added together; as, the sum of 5 and 7 is 12.
Take ye the sum of all the congregation.
&hand; Sum is now commonly applied to an aggregate of numbers, and number to an aggregate of persons or things. 2. A quantity of money or currency; any amount, indefinitely; as, a sum of money; a small sum, or a large sum. "The sum of forty pound." Chaucer.
With a great sum obtained I this freedom.
3. The principal points or thoughts when viewed together; the amount; the substance; compendium; as, this is the sum of all the evidence in the case; this is the sum and substance of his objections. 4. Height; completion; utmost degree.
Thus have I told thee all my state, and brought My story to the sum of earthly bliss.
5. (Arith.) A problem to be solved, or an example to be wrought out. Macaulay.
A sum in arithmetic wherein a flaw discovered at a particular point is ipso facto fatal to the whole.
A large sheet of paper . . . covered with long sums.
Algebraic sum, as distinguished from arithmetical sum, the aggregate of two or more numbers or quantities taken with regard to their signs, as + or -, according to the rules of addition in algebra; thus, the algebraic sum of -2, 8, and -1 is 5. -- In sum, in short; in brief. [Obs.] "In sum, the gospel . . . prescribes every virtue to our conduct, and forbids every sin." Rogers.

Sum

Sum, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Summed ; p. pr. & vb. n. Summing.] [Cf. F. sommer, LL. summare.] 1. To bring together into one whole; to collect into one amount; to cast up, as a column of figures; to ascertain the totality of; -- usually with up.
The mind doth value every moment, and then the hour doth rather sum up the moments, than divide the day.
2. To bring or collect into a small compass; to comprise in a few words; to condense; -- usually with up.
"Go to the ant, thou sluggard," in few words sums up the moral of this fable.
He sums their virtues in himself alone.
3. (Falconry) To have (the feathers) full grown; to furnish with complete, or full-grown, plumage.
But feathered soon and fledge They summed their pens [wings].
Summing up, a compendium or abridgment; a recapitulation; a r'82sum'82; a summary. Syn. -- To cast up; collect; comprise; condense; comprehend; compute.

The aggregate of two or more numbers, magnitudes, quantities, or particulars; the amount or whole of any number of individuals or particulars added together; as, the sum of 5 and 7 is 12.

To bring together into one whole; to collect into one amount; to cast up, as a column of figures; to ascertain the totality of; -- usually with up.

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Usage Examples

I'm asked all the time in interviews about who I am, and I know a few people my age who have a strong sense of self, but I couldn't say I know myself and sum it up and give it to you in a little package. I don't know myself at all yet.

Life is painting a picture, not doing a sum.

I hold that the perfection of form and beauty is contained in the sum of all men.

Being rich is a good thing. Not just in the obvious sense of benefitting you and your family, but in the broader sense. Profits are not a zero sum game. The more you make, the more of a financial impact you can have.

'Freedom from fear' could be said to sum up the whole philosophy of human rights.

I would sum up my fear about the future in one word: boring. And that's my one fear: that everything has happened nothing exciting or new or interesting is ever going to happen again... the future is just going to be a vast, conforming suburb of the soul.

Find combinations of flavors you love and buy the best quality ingredients you can afford. Your food is only going to be as good as the sum of its parts, like anything else.

Misspelled Form

sum, asum, wsum, esum, dsum, xsum, zsum, aum, wum, eum, dum, xum, zum, saum, swum, seum, sdum, sxum, szum, syum, s7um, s8um, sium, sjum, sym, s7m, s8m, sim, sjm, suym, su7m, su8m, suim, sujm, sunm, sujm, sukm, su,m, su m, sun, suj, suk, su,, su , sumn, sumj, sumk, sum,, sum .

Other Usage Examples

Life is a series of collisions with the future it is not the sum of what we have been, but what we yearn to be.

A wise and frugal Government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, which shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government, and this is necessary to close the circlue of our felicities.

An institution or reform movement that is not selfish, must originate in the recognition of some evil that is adding to the sum of human suffering, or diminishing the sum of happiness.

History is the sum total of things that could have been avoided.

Imagine a world in which every single person on the planet is given free access to the sum of all human knowledge. That's what we're doing.

In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on.

It is impossible for any number which is a power greater than the second to be written as a sum of two like powers. I have a truly marvelous demonstration of this proposition which this margin is too narrow to contain.

I find it quite hard to sum up my relationship in a sound bite. I feel that it trivializes it for other people's pleasure. It's an adventure.

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