study

...
[studĀ·y]

It might seem as if you've gone catatonic, staring at a crack in the sidewalk for so long, but really you're observing it as closely as possible for your study of ant movement.

...

A setting of the mind or thoughts upon a subject; hence, application of mind to books, arts, or science, or to any subject, for the purpose of acquiring knowledge.

Noun
a detailed critical inspection

Noun
preliminary drawing for later elaboration; "he made several studies before starting to paint"

Noun
a room used for reading and writing and studying; "he knocked lightly on the closed door of the study"

Noun
a state of deep mental absorption; "she is in a deep study"

Noun
applying the mind to learning and understanding a subject (especially by reading); "mastering a second language requires a lot of work"; "no schools offer graduate study in interior design"

...

Noun
attentive consideration and meditation; "after much cogitation he rejected the offer"

Noun
a branch of knowledge; "in what discipline is his doctorate?"; "teachers should be well trained in their subject"; "anthropology is the study of human beings"

Noun
a composition intended to develop one aspect of the performer''s technique; "a study in spiccato bowing"

Noun
a written document describing the findings of some individual or group; "this accords with the recent study by Hill and Dale"

Noun
someone who memorizes quickly and easily (as the lines for a part in a play); "he is a quick study"

Verb
be a student of a certain subject; "She is reading for the bar exam"

Verb
learn by reading books; "He is studying geology in his room"; "I have an exam next week; I must hit the books now"

Verb
be a student; follow a course of study; be enrolled at an institute of learning

Verb
consider in detail and subject to an analysis in order to discover essential features or meaning; "analyze a sonnet by Shakespeare"; "analyze the evidence in a criminal trial"; "analyze your real motives"

Verb
think intently and at length, as for spiritual purposes; "He is meditating in his study"

Verb
give careful consideration to; "consider the possibility of moving"


v. i.
A setting of the mind or thoughts upon a subject; hence, application of mind to books, arts, or science, or to any subject, for the purpose of acquiring knowledge.

v. i.
Mental occupation; absorbed or thoughtful attention; meditation; contemplation.

v. i.
Any particular branch of learning that is studied; any object of attentive consideration.

v. i.
A building or apartment devoted to study or to literary work.

v. i.
A representation or rendering of any object or scene intended, not for exhibition as an original work of art, but for the information, instruction, or assistance of the maker; as, a study of heads or of hands for a figure picture.

v. i.
A piece for special practice. See Etude.

n.
To fix the mind closely upon a subject; to dwell upon anything in thought; to muse; to ponder.

n.
To apply the mind to books or learning.

n.
To endeavor diligently; to be zealous.

v. t.
To apply the mind to; to read and examine for the purpose of learning and understanding; as, to study law or theology; to study languages.

v. t.
To consider attentively; to examine closely; as, to study the work of nature.

v. t.
To form or arrange by previous thought; to con over, as in committing to memory; as, to study a speech.

v. t.
To make an object of study; to aim at sedulously; to devote one's thoughts to; as, to study the welfare of others; to study variety in composition.


Study

Stud"y , n.; pl. Studies . [OE. studie, L. studium, akin to studere to study; possibly akin to Gr. haste, zeal, to hasten; cf. OF. estudie, estude, F. '82tude. Cf. Etude, Student, Studio, Study, v. i.] 1. A setting of the mind or thoughts upon a subject; hence, application of mind to books, arts, or science, or to any subject, for the purpose of acquiring knowledge.
Hammond . . . spent thirteen hours of the day in study.
Study gives strength to the mind; conversation, grace.
2. Mental occupation; absorbed or thoughtful attention; meditation; contemplation.
Just men they seemed, and all their study bent To worship God aright, and know his works.
3. Any particular branch of learning that is studied; any object of attentive consideration.
The Holy Scriptures, especially the New Testament, are her daily study.
The proper study of mankind is man.
4. A building or apartment devoted to study or to literary work. "His cheery little study." Hawthorne. 5. (Fine Arts) A representation or rendering of any object or scene intended, not for exhibition as an original work of art, but for the information, instruction, or assistance of the maker; as, a study of heads or of hands for a figure picture. 6. (Mus.) A piece for special practice. See Etude.

Study

Stud"y , v. i. [imp. & p. p. Studied ; p. pr. & vb. n. Studying .] [OE. studien, OF. estudier, F. '82tudier. See Study, n.] 1. To fix the mind closely upon a subject; to dwell upon anything in thought; to muse; to ponder. Chaucer.
I found a moral first, and then studied for a fable.
2. To apply the mind to books or learning. Shak. 3. To endeavor diligently; to be zealous. 1 Thes. iv. 11.

Study

Stud"y, v. t. 1. To apply the mind to; to read and examine for the purpose of learning and understanding; as, to study law or theology; to study languages. 2. To consider attentively; to examine closely; as, to study the work of nature.
Study thyself; what rank or what degree The wise Creator has ordained for thee.
3. To form or arrange by previous thought; to con over, as in committing to memory; as, to study a speech. 4. To make an object of study; to aim at sedulously; to devote one's thoughts to; as, to study the welfare of others; to study variety in composition.
For their heart studieth destruction.

A setting of the mind or thoughts upon a subject; hence, application of mind to books, arts, or science, or to any subject, for the purpose of acquiring knowledge.

To fix the mind closely upon a subject; to dwell upon anything in thought; to muse; to ponder.

To apply the mind to; to read and examine for the purpose of learning and understanding; as, to study law or theology; to study languages.

...

Usage Examples

Art is not a study of positive reality, it is the seeking for ideal truth.

A Harvard Medical School study has determined that rectal thermometers are still the best way to tell a baby's temperature. Plus, it really teaches the baby who's boss.

Don't try to be like Jackie. There is only one Jackie. Study computers instead.

Dream study impacts culture. We are put in touch with the inner poet who dreams. We hear our inner, subjective response to the outer world. That helps spiritualize our lives.

At any rate, girls are differently situated. Having no need of deep scientific knowledge, their education is confined more to the ordinary things of the world, the study of the fine arts, and of the manners and dispositions of people.

A study of the history of opinion is a necessary preliminary to the emancipation of the mind.

A single conversation across the table with a wise man is better than ten years mere study of books.

Misspelled Form

study, astudy, wstudy, estudy, dstudy, xstudy, zstudy, atudy, wtudy, etudy, dtudy, xtudy, ztudy, satudy, swtudy, setudy, sdtudy, sxtudy, sztudy, srtudy, s5tudy, s6tudy, sytudy, sgtudy, srudy, s5udy, s6udy, syudy, sgudy, strudy, st5udy, st6udy, styudy, stgudy, styudy, st7udy, st8udy, stiudy, stjudy, stydy, st7dy, st8dy, stidy, stjdy, stuydy, stu7dy, stu8dy, stuidy, stujdy, stusdy, stuedy, stufdy, stuxdy, stucdy, stusy, stuey, stufy, stuxy, stucy, studsy, studey, studfy, studxy, studcy, studty, stud6y, stud7y, studuy, studhy, studt, stud6, stud7, studu, studh, studyt, study6, study7, studyu, studyh.

Other Usage Examples

And we are never too old to study the Bible. Each time the lessons are studied comes some new meaning, some new thought which will make us better.

Another cause of change, one less noticeable but fundamental, is the modern growth of population closely connected with scientific and medical discoveries. It is interesting that the United Nations has set up a special Commission to study this question.

An architect should live as little in cities as a painter. Send him to our hills, and let him study there what nature understands by a buttress, and what by a dome.

And religion causes most of the problems, war, and economics of course, and study your history or you're going to repeat it and if you're burning a Harry Potter book you need some serious counseling, you don't get it, you're missing the whole point.

A powerful attraction exists, therefore, to the promotion of a study and of duties of all others engrossing the time most completely, and which is less benefited than most others by any acquaintance with science.

Can you imagine young people nowadays making a study of trigonometry for the fun of it? Well I did.

A study in the Washington Post says that women have better verbal skills than men. I just want to say to the authors of that study: 'Duh.'

Companies like I.B.M. have offered women scholarships to study engineering for years, and women engineers routinely get higher starting salaries than men.

Comments


Browse Dictionary