stroke

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[Stroke]

It's a stroke of luck, or chance event, to find a terrific parking space on a rainy day, but no one feels lucky when their grandfather has a stroke, a sudden debilitating loss of oxygen to the brain.

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Struck.

Noun
a light touch with the hands

Noun
a single complete movement

Noun
(sports) the act of swinging or striking at a ball with a club or racket or bat or cue or hand; "it took two strokes to get out of the bunker"; "a good shot require good balance and tempo"; "he left me an almost impossible shot"

Noun
any one of the repeated movements of the limbs and body used for locomotion in swimming or rowing

Noun
a mark made by a writing implement (as in cursive writing)

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Noun
a punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information

Noun
the maximum movement available to a pivoted or reciprocating piece by a cam

Noun
a light touch

Noun
the oarsman nearest the stern of the shell who sets the pace for the rest of the crew

Noun
a sudden loss of consciousness resulting when the rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel leads to oxygen lack in the brain

Verb
treat gingerly or carefully; "You have to stroke the boss"

Verb
strike a ball with a smooth blow

Verb
row at a particular rate

Verb
touch lightly and with affection, with brushing motions; "He stroked his long beard"


imp.
Struck.

v. t.
The act of striking; a blow; a hit; a knock; esp., a violent or hostile attack made with the arm or hand, or with an instrument or weapon.

v. t.
The result of effect of a striking; injury or affliction; soreness.

v. t.
The striking of the clock to tell the hour.

v. t.
A gentle, caressing touch or movement upon something; a stroking.

v. t.
A mark or dash in writing or printing; a line; the touch of a pen or pencil; as, an up stroke; a firm stroke.

v. t.
Hence, by extension, an addition or amandment to a written composition; a touch; as, to give some finishing strokes to an essay.

v. t.
A sudden attack of disease; especially, a fatal attack; a severe disaster; any affliction or calamity, especially a sudden one; as, a stroke of apoplexy; the stroke of death.

v. t.
A throb or beat, as of the heart.

v. t.
One of a series of beats or movements against a resisting medium, by means of which movement through or upon it is accomplished; as, the stroke of a bird's wing in flying, or an oar in rowing, of a skater, swimmer, etc.

v. t.
The rate of succession of stroke; as, a quick stroke.

v. t.
The oar nearest the stern of a boat, by which the other oars are guided; -- called also stroke oar.

v. t.
The rower who pulls the stroke oar; the strokesman.

v. t.
A powerful or sudden effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished; also, something done or accomplished by such an effort; as, a stroke of genius; a stroke of business; a master stroke of policy.

v. t.
The movement, in either direction, of the piston plunger, piston rod, crosshead, etc., as of a steam engine or a pump, in which these parts have a reciprocating motion; as, the forward stroke of a piston; also, the entire distance passed through, as by a piston, in such a movement; as, the piston is at half stroke.

v. t.
Power; influence.

v. t.
Appetite.

v. t.
To strike.

v. t.
To rib gently in one direction; especially, to pass the hand gently over by way of expressing kindness or tenderness; to caress; to soothe.

v. t.
To make smooth by rubbing.

v. t.
To give a finely fluted surface to.

v. t.
To row the stroke oar of; as, to stroke a boat.


Stroke

Stroke , obs. imp. of Strike. Struck.

Stroke

Stroke, n. [OE. strok, strook, strak, fr. striken. See Strike, v. t.] 1. The act of striking; a blow; a hit; a knock; esp., a violent or hostile attack made with the arm or hand, or with an instrument or weapon.
His hand fetcheth a stroke with the ax to cut down the tree.
A fool's lips enter into contention and his mouth calleth for strokes.
He entered and won the whole kingdom of Naples without striking a stroke.
2. The result of effect of a striking; injury or affliction; soreness.
In the day that Lord bindeth up the breach of his people, and healeth the stroke of their wound.
3. The striking of the clock to tell the hour.
Well, but what's o'clock? - Upon the stroke of ten. -- Well, let is strike.
4. A gentle, caressing touch or movement upon something; a stroking. Dryden. 5. A mark or dash in writing or printing; a line; the touch of a pen or pencil; as, an up stroke; a firm stroke.
O, lasting as those colors may they shine, Free as thy stroke, yet faultless as thy line.
6. Hence, by extension, an addition or amandment to a written composition; a touch; as, to give some finishing strokes to an essay. Addison. 7. A sudden attack of disease; especially, a fatal attack; a severe disaster; any affliction or calamity, especially a sudden one; as, a stroke of apoplexy; the stroke of death.
At this one stroke the man looked dead in law.
8. A throb or beat, as of the heart. Tennyson. 9. One of a series of beats or movements against a resisting medium, by means of which movement through or upon it is accomplished; as, the stroke of a bird's wing in flying, or an oar in rowing, of a skater, swimmer, etc.; also: (Rowing) (a) The rate of succession of stroke; as, a quick stroke. (b) The oar nearest the stern of a boat, by which the other oars are guided; -- called also stroke oar. (c) The rower who pulls the stroke oar; the strokesman. 10. A powerful or sudden effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished; also, something done or accomplished by such an effort; as, a stroke of genius; a stroke of business; a master stroke of policy. 11. (Mach.) The movement, in either direction, of the piston plunger, piston rod, crosshead, etc., as of a steam engine or a pump, in which these parts have a reciprocating motion; as, the forward stroke of a piston; also, the entire distance passed through, as by a piston, in such a movement; as, the piston is at half stroke. &hand; The respective strokes are distinguished as up and down strokes, outward and inward strokes, forward and back strokes, the forward stroke in stationary steam engines being toward the crosshead, but in locomotives toward the front of the vehicle. 12. Power; influence. [Obs.] "Where money beareth [hath] all the stroke." Robynson (More's Utopia).
He has a great stroke with the reader.
13. Appetite. [Obs.] Swift. To keep stroke, to make strokes in unison.
The oars where silver, Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke.

Stroke

Stroke , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Strokeed ; p. pr. & vb. n. Strokeing.] [OE. stroken, straken, AS. str'becian, fr. str'c6can to go over, pass. See Strike, v. t., and cf. Straggle.] 1. To strike. [Obs.]
Ye mote with the plat sword again Stroken him in the wound, and it will close.
2. To rib gently in one direction; especially, to pass the hand gently over by way of expressing kindness or tenderness; to caress; to soothe.
He dried the falling drops, and, yet more kind, He stroked her cheeks.
3. To make smooth by rubbing. Longfellow. 4. (Masonry) To give a finely fluted surface to. 5. To row the stroke oar of; as, to stroke a boat.

Struck.

The act of striking; a blow; a hit; a knock; esp., a violent or hostile attack made with the arm or hand, or with an instrument or weapon.

To strike.

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Usage Examples

My theory of characterization is basically this: Put some dirt on a hero, and put some sunshine on the villain, one brush stroke of beauty on the villain.

My dad died of a stroke.

I used to be a real prince charming if I went on a date with a girl. But then I'd get to where I was likely to have a stroke from the stress of keeping up my act. I've since learned the key to a good date is to pay attention on her.

The stroke of death is as a lover's pinch, which hurts and is desired.

Misspelled Form

stroke, astroke, wstroke, estroke, dstroke, xstroke, zstroke, atroke, wtroke, etroke, dtroke, xtroke, ztroke, satroke, swtroke, setroke, sdtroke, sxtroke, sztroke, srtroke, s5troke, s6troke, sytroke, sgtroke, srroke, s5roke, s6roke, syroke, sgroke, strroke, st5roke, st6roke, styroke, stgroke, steroke, st4roke, st5roke, sttroke, stfroke, steoke, st4oke, st5oke, sttoke, stfoke, streoke, str4oke, str5oke, strtoke, strfoke, strioke, str9oke, str0oke, strpoke, strloke, strike, str9ke, str0ke, strpke, strlke, stroike, stro9ke, stro0ke, stropke, strolke, strojke, stroike, strooke, strolke, stromke, stroje, stroie, strooe, strole, strome, strokje, strokie, strokoe, strokle, strokme, strokwe, strok3e, strok4e, strokre, strokse, strokde, strokw, strok3, strok4, strokr, stroks, strokd, strokew, stroke3, stroke4, stroker, strokes, stroked.

Other Usage Examples

I do not believe that any man fears to be dead, but only the stroke of death.

I am going to confront the old-fashioned negative thinking which says that all government needs to do to generate growth is cut worker and environmental protections, cut taxes on the rich and stroke 'fat cats' until they purr with pleasure. I'm completely repudiating the idea that government has to get out of the way.

Tactics, fitness, stroke ability, adaptability, experience, and sportsmanship are all necessary for winning.

Flying back from New York, the flight attendant said 'God, I wished you were here yesterday, we had a stroke on the plane. I said, if I have a stroke on a plane, I hope the pretend doctor isn't the one on the plane. I want a real doctor.

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