stream

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[Stream]

That little rolling brook in your back yard is a stream. If it starts rising and threatens to flood, your father might let out a stream of expletives. A stream is a steady flow of something.

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A current water or other fluid; a liquid flowing continuously in a line or course, either on the earth, as a river, brook, etc., or from a vessel, reservoir, or fountain; specifically, any course of running water; as, many streams are blended in the Mississippi; gas and steam came from the earth in streams; a stream of molten lead from a furnace; a stream of lava from a volcano.

Noun
the act of flowing or streaming; continuous progression

Noun
a steady flow (usually from natural causes); "the raft floated downstream on the current"; "he felt a stream of air"

Noun
dominant course (suggestive of running water) of successive events or ideas; "two streams of development run through American history"; "stream of consciousness"; "the flow of thought"; "the current of history"

Noun
a natural body of running water flowing on or under the earth

Noun
something that resembles a flowing stream in moving continuously; "a stream of people emptied from the terminal"; "the museum had planned carefully for the flow of visitors"

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Verb
exude profusely; "She was streaming with sweat"; "His nose streamed blood"

Verb
move in large numbers; "people were pouring out of the theater"; "beggars pullulated in the plaza"

Verb
flow freely and abundantly; "Tears streamed down her face"

Verb
to extend, wave or float outward, as if in the wind; "their manes streamed like stiff black pennants in the wind"

Verb
rain heavily; "Put on your rain coat-- it''s pouring outside!"


n.
A current of water or other fluid; a liquid flowing continuously in a line or course, either on the earth, as a river, brook, etc., or from a vessel, reservoir, or fountain; specifically, any course of running water; as, many streams are blended in the Mississippi; gas and steam came from the earth in streams; a stream of molten lead from a furnace; a stream of lava from a volcano.

n.
A beam or ray of light.

n.
Anything issuing or moving with continued succession of parts; as, a stream of words; a stream of sand.

n.
A continued current or course; as, a stream of weather.

n.
Current; drift; tendency; series of tending or moving causes; as, the stream of opinions or manners.

v. i.
To issue or flow in a stream; to flow freely or in a current, as a fluid or whatever is likened to fluids; as, tears streamed from her eyes.

v. i.
To pour out, or emit, a stream or streams.

v. i.
To issue in a stream of light; to radiate.

v. i.
To extend; to stretch out with a wavy motion; to float in the wind; as, a flag streams in the wind.

v. t.
To send forth in a current or stream; to cause to flow; to pour; as, his eyes streamed tears.

v. t.
To mark with colors or embroidery in long tracts.

v. t.
To unfurl.


Stream

Stream , n. [AS. stre'a0m; akin to OFries. str'bem, OS. str'd3m, D. stroom, G. strom, OHG. stroum, strm, Dan. & Sw. str'94m, Icel. straumr, Ir. sroth, Lith. srove, Russ. struia, Gr. a flowing, to flow, Skr. sru. 'fb174. Cf. Catarrh, Diarrhea, Rheum, Rhythm.] 1. A current water or other fluid; a liquid flowing continuously in a line or course, either on the earth, as a river, brook, etc., or from a vessel, reservoir, or fountain; specifically, any course of running water; as, many streams are blended in the Mississippi; gas and steam came from the earth in streams; a stream of molten lead from a furnace; a stream of lava from a volcano. 2. A beam or ray of light. "Sun streams." Chaucer. 3. Anything issuing or moving with continued succession of parts; as, a stream of words; a stream of sand. "The stream of beneficence." Atterbury. "The stream of emigration." Macaulay. 4. A continued current or course; as, a stream of weather. "The very stream of his life." Shak. 5. Current; drift; tendency; series of tending or moving causes; as, the stream of opinions or manners. Gulf stream. See under Gulf. -- Stream anchor, Stream cable. (Naut.) See under Anchor, and Cable. -- Stream ice, blocks of ice floating in a mass together in some definite direction. -- Stream tin, particles or masses of tin ore found in alluvial ground; -- so called because a stream of water is the principal agent used in separating the ore from the sand and gravel. -- Stream works (Cornish Mining), a place where an alluvial deposit of tin ore is worked. Ure. -- To float with the stream, figuratively, to drift with the current of opinion, custom, etc., so as not to oppose or check it. Syn. -- Current; flow; rush; tide; course. -- Stream, Current. These words are often properly interchangeable; but stream is the broader word, denoting a prevailing onward course. The stream of the Mississippi rolls steadily on to the Gulf of Mexico, but there are reflex currents in it which run for a while in a contrary direction.

Stream

Stream, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Streamed ; p. pr. & vb. n. Streaming.] 1. To issue or flow in a stream; to flow freely or in a current, as a fluid or whatever is likened to fluids; as, tears streamed from her eyes.
Beneath those banks where rivers stream.
2. To pour out, or emit, a stream or streams.
A thousand suns will stream on thee.
3. To issue in a stream of light; to radiate. 4. To extend; to stretch out with a wavy motion; to float in the wind; as, a flag streams in the wind.

Stream

Stream, v. t. To send forth in a current or stream; to cause to flow; to pour; as, his eyes streamed tears.
It may so please that she at length will stream Some dew of grace into my withered heart.
2. To mark with colors or embroidery in long tracts.
The herald's mantle is streamed with gold.
3. To unfurl. Shak. To stream the buoy. (Naut.) See under Buoy.

A current water or other fluid; a liquid flowing continuously in a line or course, either on the earth, as a river, brook, etc., or from a vessel, reservoir, or fountain; specifically, any course of running water; as, many streams are blended in the Mississippi; gas and steam came from the earth in streams; a stream of molten lead from a furnace; a stream of lava from a volcano.

To issue or flow in a stream; to flow freely or in a current, as a fluid or whatever is likened to fluids; as, tears streamed from her eyes.

To send forth in a current or stream; to cause to flow; to pour; as, his eyes streamed tears.

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Usage Examples

In every age there has been a stream of popular opinion that has carried all before it, and given a family character, as it were, to the century.

I listen to KCRW in the car and Pandora radio, which I stream through the stereo from my iPhone. I've been listening to everything from Caribou to Conway Twitty. If I'm going on a longer car ride, I'll download some podcasts.

With the never-ending stream of new social technologies, apps and platforms rolling out every day, its easy to get lost in the minutiae of social media. Yet for there to be effective change, especially within large, top-down, hierarchical institutions, a company must have an over-arching understanding of the new role it has to play.

I agree that it is not just the extremists who harbor bad thoughts or engage in bad acts, but they are usually the source of the polarization and try to keep education and communication of the main stream from moving forward.

Unlike then, the mail stream of today has diminished by such things as e-mails and faxes and cell phones and text messages, largely electronic means of communication that replace mail.

There's a joy and a pain about directing where the dreams you have are becoming concrete but the attention to detail, the need for time is such that it's overwhelming at times, and the stream of responsibility.

Slowly the poison the whole blood stream fills. It is not the effort nor the failure tires. The waste remains, the waste remains and kills.

The man who is swimming against the stream knows the strength of it.

Misspelled Form

stream, astream, wstream, estream, dstream, xstream, zstream, atream, wtream, etream, dtream, xtream, ztream, satream, swtream, setream, sdtream, sxtream, sztream, srtream, s5tream, s6tream, sytream, sgtream, srream, s5ream, s6ream, syream, sgream, strream, st5ream, st6ream, styream, stgream, steream, st4ream, st5ream, sttream, stfream, steeam, st4eam, st5eam, stteam, stfeam, streeam, str4eam, str5eam, strteam, strfeam, strweam, str3eam, str4eam, strream, strseam, strdeam, strwam, str3am, str4am, strram, strsam, strdam, strewam, stre3am, stre4am, streram, stresam, stredam, streqam, strewam, stresam, strezam, streqm, strewm, stresm, strezm, streaqm, streawm, streasm, streazm, streanm, streajm, streakm, strea,m, strea m, strean, streaj, streak, strea,, strea , streamn, streamj, streamk, stream,, stream .

Other Usage Examples

Once you get into this great stream of history, you can't get out.

Character develops itself in the stream of life.

On balance, my life has been a constant stream of blessings rather than disappointments and failures and tragedies. I wish I had been re-elected. I think I could have kept our country at peace. I think I could have consolidated what we achieved at Camp David with a treaty between Israel and the Palestinians.

No horse gets anywhere until he is harnessed. No stream or gas drives anything until it is confined. No Niagara is ever turned into light and power until it is tunneled. No life ever grows great until it is focused, dedicated, disciplined.

Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in.

If you believe in your heart that you are right, you must fight with all your might to do it your way. Only dead fish swim with the stream all the time.

A truer image of the world, I think, is obtained by picturing things as entering into the stream of time from an eternal world outside, than from a view which regards time as the devouring tyrant of all that is.

Traveling is my form of self-education. Every stream I fish now is not as good as it used to be. Traveling is my form of self-education. Every stream I fish now is not as good as it used to be. If you keep your eyes open as you travel around, you realize we are destroying this planet.

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