station

[Sta┬Ětion]

A station is a regular stopping place, like a bus station, a train station, or even a radio station.

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The act of standing; also, attitude or pose in standing; posture.

Noun
a facility equipped with special equipment and personnel for a particular purpose; "he started looking for a gas station"; "the train pulled into the station"

Noun
the position where someone (as a guard or sentry) stands or is assigned to stand; "a soldier manned the entrance post"; "a sentry station"

Noun
(nautical) the location to which a ship or fleet is assigned for duty

Noun
proper or designated social situation; "he overstepped his place"; "the responsibilities of a man in his station"; "married above her station"

Verb
assign to a station

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n.
The act of standing; also, attitude or pose in standing; posture.

n.
A state of standing or rest; equilibrium.

n.
The spot or place where anything stands, especially where a person or thing habitually stands, or is appointed to remain for a time; as, the station of a sentinel.

n.
A regular stopping place in a stage road or route; a place where railroad trains regularly come to a stand, for the convenience of passengers, taking in fuel, moving freight, etc.

n.
The headquarters of the police force of any precinct.

n.
The place at which an instrument is planted, or observations are made, as in surveying.

n.
The particular place, or kind of situation, in which a species naturally occurs; a habitat.

n.
A place to which ships may resort, and where they may anchor safely.

n.
A place or region to which a government ship or fleet is assigned for duty.

n.
A place calculated for the rendezvous of troops, or for the distribution of them; also, a spot well adapted for offensive measures. Wilhelm (Mil. Dict.).

n.
An enlargement in a shaft or galley, used as a landing, or passing place, or for the accomodation of a pump, tank, etc.

n.
Post assigned; office; the part or department of public duty which a person is appointed to perform; sphere of duty or occupation; employment.

n.
Situation; position; location.

n.
State; rank; condition of life; social status.

n.
The fast of the fourth and sixth days of the week, Wednesday and Friday, in memory of the council which condemned Christ, and of his passion.

n.
A church in which the procession of the clergy halts on stated days to say stated prayers.

n.
One of the places at which ecclesiastical processions pause for the performance of an act of devotion; formerly, the tomb of a martyr, or some similarly consecrated spot; now, especially, one of those representations of the successive stages of our Lord's passion which are often placed round the naves of large churches and by the side of the way leading to sacred edifices or shrines, and which are visited in rotation, stated services being performed at each; -- called also Station of the cross.

v. t.
To place; to set; to appoint or assign to the occupation of a post, place, or office; as, to station troops on the right of an army; to station a sentinel on a rampart; to station ships on the coasts of Africa.


Station

Sta"tion , n. [F., fr. L. statio, from stare, statum, to stand. See Stand.] 1. The act of standing; also, attitude or pose in standing; posture. [R.]
A station like the herald, Mercury.
Their manner was to stand at prayer, whereupon their meetings unto that purpose . . . had the names of stations given them.
2. A state of standing or rest; equilibrium. [Obs.]
All progression is performed by drawing on or impelling forward some part which was before in station, or at quiet.
3. The spot or place where anything stands, especially where a person or thing habitually stands, or is appointed to remain for a time; as, the station of a sentinel. Specifically: (a) A regular stopping place in a stage road or route; a place where railroad trains regularly come to a stand, for the convenience of passengers, taking in fuel, moving freight, etc. (b) The headquarters of the police force of any precinct. (c) The place at which an instrument is planted, or observations are made, as in surveying. (d) (Biol.) The particular place, or kind of situation, in which a species naturally occurs; a habitat. (e) (Naut.) A place to which ships may resort, and where they may anchor safely. (f) A place or region to which a government ship or fleet is assigned for duty. (g) (Mil.) A place calculated for the rendezvous of troops, or for the distribution of them; also, a spot well adapted for offensive measures. Wilhelm (Mil. Dict.). (h) (Mining) An enlargement in a shaft or galley, used as a landing, or passing place, or for the accomodation of a pump, tank, etc. 4. Post assigned; office; the part or department of public duty which a person is appointed to perform; sphere of duty or occupation; employment.
By spending this day [Sunday] in religious exercises, we acquire new strength and resolution to perform God's will in our several stations the week following.
5. Situation; position; location.
The fig and date -- why love they to remain In middle station, and an even plain?
6. State; rank; condition of life; social status.
The greater part have kept, I see, Their station.
They in France of the best rank and station.
7. (Eccl.) (a) The fast of the fourth and sixth days of the week, Wednesday and Friday, in memory of the council which condemned Christ, and of his passion. (b) (R. C. Ch.) A church in which the procession of the clergy halts on stated days to say stated prayers. Addis & Arnold. (c) One of the places at which ecclesiastical processions pause for the performance of an act of devotion; formerly, the tomb of a martyr, or some similarly consecrated spot; now, especially, one of those representations of the successive stages of our Lord's passion which are often placed round the naves of large churches and by the side of the way leading to sacred edifices or shrines, and which are visited in rotation, stated services being performed at each; -- called also Station of the cross. Fairholt. Station bill. (Naut.) Same as Quarter bill, under Quarter. -- Station house. (a) The house serving for the headquarters of the police assigned to a certain district, and as a place of temporary confinement. (b) The house used as a shelter at a railway station. -- Station master, one who has charge of a station, esp. of a railway station. -- Station pointer (Surv.), an instrument for locating on a chart the position of a place from which the angles subtended by three distant objects, whose positions are known, have been observed. -- Station staff (Surv.), an instrument for taking angles in surveying. Craig. Syn. -- Station, Depot. In the United States, a stopping place on a railway for passengers and freight is commonly called a depot: but to a considerable extent in official use, and in common speech, the more appropriate name, station, has been adopted.

Station

Sta"tion , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Stationed ; p. pr. & vb. n. Stationing.] To place; to set; to appoint or assign to the occupation of a post, place, or office; as, to station troops on the right of an army; to station a sentinel on a rampart; to station ships on the coasts of Africa.
He gained the brow of the hill, where the English phalanx was stationed.

The act of standing; also, attitude or pose in standing; posture.

To place; to set; to appoint or assign to the occupation of a post, place, or office; as, to station troops on the right of an army; to station a sentinel on a rampart; to station ships on the coasts of Africa.

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Usage Examples

On a royal birthday every house must fly a flag, or the owner would be dragged to a police station and be fined twenty-five rubles.

Law is not a profession at all, but rather a business service station and repair shop.

If you or me go to the gas station to fill up our car and it costs us much more than we expected, it will zap our discretionary income. We won't have the extra money to buy that washing machine or new winter coat-all big ticket items that are important to economic growth.

My dad is this very sensible guy who never let me feel that anything was beyond my station.

I am going to design... a Station after my own fancy that is, with engineering roofs, etc.

Propaganda must appeal to mankind's better judgment and to the necessary belief in a better future. For this belief, the valley of the shadow of death is but a war station on the road to the blessed summit.

Alas! if the principles of contentment are not within us, the height of station and worldly grandeur will as soon add a cubit to a man's stature as to his happiness.

Happiness: a way station between too little and too much.

I wasn't privy to all of the intelligence that was coming in about Guatemala, but I did see the traffic that was coming in from Guatemala City, because it was very relevant to me, and of course I exchanged what I had with the chief of station in Guatemala City.

Misspelled Form

station, astation, wstation, estation, dstation, xstation, zstation, atation, wtation, etation, dtation, xtation, ztation, satation, swtation, setation, sdtation, sxtation, sztation, srtation, s5tation, s6tation, sytation, sgtation, sration, s5ation, s6ation, syation, sgation, stration, st5ation, st6ation, styation, stgation, stqation, stwation, stsation, stzation, stqtion, stwtion, ststion, stztion, staqtion, stawtion, stastion, staztion, startion, sta5tion, sta6tion, staytion, stagtion, starion, sta5ion, sta6ion, stayion, stagion, statrion, stat5ion, stat6ion, statyion, statgion, statuion, stat8ion, stat9ion, statoion, statjion, statkion, statuon, stat8on, stat9on, statoon, statjon, statkon, statiuon, stati8on, stati9on, statioon, statijon, statikon, statiion, stati9on, stati0on, statipon, statilon, statiin, stati9n, stati0n, statipn, statiln, statioin, statio9n, statio0n, statiopn, statioln, statiobn, statiohn, statiojn, statiomn, statio n, statiob, statioh, statioj, statiom, statio , stationb, stationh, stationj, stationm, station .

Other Usage Examples

If no other knowledge deserves to be called useful but that which helps to enlarge our possessions or to raise our station in society, then Mythology has no claim to the appellation.

Labor, under their current leadership, want to be the Downtown Abbey party when it comes to educational opportunity. They think working class children should stick to the station in life they were born into - they should be happy to be recognized for being good with their hands and not presume to get above themselves.

I had been here five years already, training very hard, learning about the systems, the shuttle, the station systems. But, everything really became real when I started to work with them.

Dinner 'conversation' at the Cohens' meant my sister, mom, and I relaying in brutal detail the day's events in a state of amplified hysteria, while my father listened to his own smooth jazz station in his head.

I was in Washington, D.C., on the morning show, by the time I was 18, programming a station by 19, No. 1 in the mornings. I think I was making, I don't know, a quarter of a million dollars by the time I was 25.

I lived at home and I cycled every morning to the railway station to travel by train to Johannesburg followed by a walk to the University, carrying sandwiches for my lunch and returning in the evening the same way.

A new father quickly learns that his child invariably comes to the bathroom at precisely the times when he's in there, as if he needed company. The only way for this father to be certain of bathroom privacy is to shave at the gas station.

Believe me, my children have more stamina than a power station.

Building one space station for everyone was and is insane: we should have built a dozen.

On the other hand, there would be some value in different folks getting together to share expertise and technology but to the listener, it wouldn't necessarily seem like a single station in the traditional sense.

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