species

[spe┬Ěcies]

A species is a distinct group of animals or plants that have common characteristics and can breed with each other. Your poodle and your bulldog are the same species, but your hamster and your goldfish are not.

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Visible or sensible presentation; appearance; a sensible percept received by the imagination; an image.

Noun
a specific kind of something; "a species of molecule"; "a species of villainy"

Noun
(biology) taxonomic group whose members can interbreed


n.
Visible or sensible presentation; appearance; a sensible percept received by the imagination; an image.

n.
A group of individuals agreeing in common attributes, and designated by a common name; a conception subordinated to another conception, called a genus, or generic conception, from which it differs in containing or comprehending more attributes, and extending to fewer individuals. Thus, man is a species, under animal as a genus; and man, in its turn, may be regarded as a genus with respect to European, American, or the like, as species.

n.
In science, a more or less permanent group of existing things or beings, associated according to attributes, or properties determined by scientific observation.

n.
A sort; a kind; a variety; as, a species of low cunning; a species of generosity; a species of cloth.

n.
Coin, or coined silver, gold, ot other metal, used as a circulating medium; specie.

n.
A public spectacle or exhibition.

n.
A component part of compound medicine; a simple.

n.
An officinal mixture or compound powder of any kind; esp., one used for making an aromatic tea or tisane; a tea mixture.

n.
The form or shape given to materials; fashion or shape; form; figure.


Species

Spe"cies , n. sing. & pl. [L., a sight, outward appearance, shape, form, a particular sort, kind, or quality, a species. See Spice, n., and cf. Specie, Special.] 1. Visible or sensible presentation; appearance; a sensible percept received by the imagination; an image. [R.] "The species of the letters illuminated with indigo and violet." Sir I. Newton.
Wit, . . . the faculty of imagination in the writer, which searches over all the memory for the species or ideas of those things which it designs to represent.
&hand; In the scholastic philosophy, the species was sensible and intelligible. The sensible species was that in any material, object which was in fact discerned by the mind through the organ of perception, or that in any object which rendered it possible that it should be perceived. The sensible species, as apprehended by the understanding in any of the relations of thought, was called an intelligible species. "An apparent diversity between the species visible and audible is, that the visible doth not mingle in the medium, but the audible doth." Bacon. 2. (Logic) A group of individuals agreeing in common attributes, and designated by a common name; a conception subordinated to another conception, called a genus, or generic conception, from which it differs in containing or comprehending more attributes, and extending to fewer individuals. Thus, man is a species, under animal as a genus; and man, in its turn, may be regarded as a genus with respect to European, American, or the like, as species. 3. In science, a more or less permanent group of existing things or beings, associated according to attributes, or properties determined by scientific observation. &hand; In mineralogy and chemistry, objects which possess the same definite chemical structure, and are fundamentally the same in crystallization and physical characters, are classed as belonging to a species. In zo'94logy and botany, a species is an ideal group of individuals which are believed to have descended from common ancestors, which agree in essential characteristics, and are capable of indefinitely continued fertile reproduction through the sexes. A species, as thus defined, differs from a variety or subspecies only in the greater stability of its characters and in the absence of individuals intermediate between the related groups. 4. A sort; a kind; a variety; as, a species of low cunning; a species of generosity; a species of cloth. 5. Coin, or coined silver, gold, ot other metal, used as a circulating medium; specie. [Obs.]
There was, in the splendor of the Roman empire, a less quantity of current species in Europe than there is now.
6. A public spectacle or exhibition. [Obs.] Bacon. 7. (Pharmacy) (a) A component part of compound medicine; a simple. (b) (Med.) An officinal mixture or compound powder of any kind; esp., one used for making an aromatic tea or tisane; a tea mixture. Quincy. 8. (Civil Law) The form or shape given to materials; fashion or shape; form; figure. Burill. Incipient species (Zo'94l.), a subspecies, or variety, which is in process of becoming permanent, and thus changing to a true species, usually by isolation in localities from which other varieties are excluded.

Visible or sensible presentation; appearance; a sensible percept received by the imagination; an image.

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Usage Examples

If it's true that our species is alone in the universe, then I'd have to say the universe aimed rather low and settled for very little.

All species capable of grasping this fact manage better in the struggle for existence than those which rely upon their own strength alone: the wolf, which hunts in a pack, has a greater chance of survival than the lion, which hunts alone.

In a state therefore of great equality and virtue, where pure and simple manners prevailed, the increase of the human species would evidently be much greater than any increase that has been hitherto known.

Although we have, in theory, abolished human slavery, recognized women's rights, and stopped child labor, we continue to enslave other species who, if we simply pay attention, show quite clearly that they experience parental love, pain, and the desire for freedom, just as we do.

I know a lot of people fear the rougher types who might be at a state school, but surely it is better to know who they are and how to deal with them than for that kind of child to appear as a completely different species to yours.

At this early stage in our evolution, now through our infancy and into our childhood and then, with luck, our growing up, what our species needs most of all, right now, is simply a future.

Heaven and hell suppose two distinct species of men, the good and the bad. But the greatest part of mankind float betwixt vice and virtue.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

Hope is itself a species of happiness, and, perhaps, the chief happiness, which this world affords.

And History will smile to think that this is the species for which Socrates and Jesus Christ died.

I absolutely don't think a sentient artificial intelligence is going to wage war against the human species.

As a species we are always hungry for new knowledge.

A man reserves his true and deepest love not for the species of woman in whose company he finds himself electrified and enkindled, but for that one in whose company he may feel tenderly drowsy.

In June as many as a dozen species may burst their buds on a single day. No man can heed all of these anniversaries no man can ignore all of them.

A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind. Games played with the ball, and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks.

Indeed, the whole human species is endangered, by nuclear weapons or by other means of wholesale destruction which further advances in science are likely to produce.

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