some

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[some]

The word some keeps it vague. When you have some time to kill, you've got an unspecified amount of time it could be five minutes or five hours.

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Consisting of a greater or less portion or sum; composed of a quantity or number which is not stated; -- used to express an indefinite quantity or number; as, some wine; some water; some persons. Used also pronominally; as, I have some.

Adjective S.
remarkable; "that was some party"; "she is some skier"

Adverb
(of quantities) imprecise but fairly close to correct; "lasted approximately an hour"; "in just about a minute"; "he''s about 30 years old"; "I''ve had about all I can stand"; "we meet about once a month"; "some forty people came"; "weighs around a hundre


a.
Consisting of a greater or less portion or sum; composed of a quantity or number which is not stated; -- used to express an indefinite quantity or number; as, some wine; some water; some persons. Used also pronominally; as, I have some.

a.
A certain; one; -- indicating a person, thing, event, etc., as not known individually, or designated more specifically; as, some man, that is, some one man.

a.
Not much; a little; moderate; as, the censure was to some extent just.

a.
About; near; more or less; -- used commonly with numerals, but formerly also with a singular substantive of time or distance; as, a village of some eighty houses; some two or three persons; some hour hence.

a.
Considerable in number or quality.

a.
Certain; those of one part or portion; -- in distinct from other or others; as, some men believe one thing, and others another.

a.
A part; a portion; -- used pronominally, and followed sometimes by of; as, some of our provisions.


Some

Some , a. [OE. som, sum, AS. sum; akin to OS., OFries., & OHG. sum, OD. som, D. sommig, Icel. sumr, Dan. somme (pl.), Sw. somlige (pl.), Goth. sums, and E. same. &root;191. See Same, a., and cf. -some.] 1. Consisting of a greater or less portion or sum; composed of a quantity or number which is not stated; -- used to express an indefinite quantity or number; as, some wine; some water; some persons. Used also pronominally; as, I have some.
Some theoretical writers allege that there was a time when there was no such thing as society.
2. A certain; one; -- indicating a person, thing, event, etc., as not known individually, or designated more specifically; as, some man, that is, some one man. "Some brighter clime." Mrs. Barbauld.
Some man praiseth his neighbor by a wicked intent.
Most gentlemen of property, at some period or other of their lives, are ambitious of representing their county in Parliament.
3. Not much; a little; moderate; as, the censure was to some extent just. 4. About; near; more or less; -- used commonly with numerals, but formerly also with a singular substantive of time or distance; as, a village of some eighty houses; some two or three persons; some hour hence. Shak.
The number slain on the rebel's part were some two thousand.
5. Considerable in number or quality. "Bore us some leagues to sea." Shak.
On its outer point, some miles away. The lighthouse lifts its massive masonry.
6. Certain; those of one part or portion; -- in distinct from other or others; as, some men believe one thing, and others another.
Some [seeds] fell among thorns; . . . but other fell into good ground.
7. A part; a portion; -- used pronominally, and followed sometimes by of; as, some of our provisions.
Your edicts some reclaim from sins, But most your life and blest example wins.
All and some, one and all. See under All, adv. [Obs.] &hand; The illiterate in the United States and Scotland often use some as an adverb, instead of somewhat, or an equivalent expression; as, I am some tired; he is some better; it rains some, etc. Some . . . some, one part . . . another part; these . . . those; -- used distributively.
Some to the shores do fly, Some to the woods, or whither fear advised.
&hand; Formerly used also of single persons or things: this one . . . that one; one . . . another.
Some in his bed, some in the deep sea.

Consisting of a greater or less portion or sum; composed of a quantity or number which is not stated; -- used to express an indefinite quantity or number; as, some wine; some water; some persons. Used also pronominally; as, I have some.

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Usage Examples

'Bombing Afghanistan back into the Stone Age' was quite a favourite headline for some wobbly liberals. The slogan does all the work. But an instant's thought shows that Afghanistan is being, if anything, bombed out of the Stone Age.

A great city, whose image dwells in the memory of man, is the type of some great idea. Rome represents conquest Faith hovers over the towers of Jerusalem and Athens embodies the pre-eminent quality of the antique world, Art.

'Allen Gregory' came about because we wanted an animated show and we were just tossing around some ideas about me playing a 7-year-old. We thought that would be cool, because we couldn't do that in real life.

A growing awareness of the depth of popular attachment to the family has led some liberals to concede that family is not just a buzzword for reaction.

A line from one of my 1997 columns - 'Do one thing every day that scares you' - is now widely attributed to Eleanor Roosevelt, though I have yet to see any evidence that she ever said it and I don't believe she did. She said some things about fear, but not that thing.

A filmmaker has almost the same freedom as a novelist has when he buys himself some paper.

A good garden may have some weeds.

Misspelled Form

some, asome, wsome, esome, dsome, xsome, zsome, aome, wome, eome, dome, xome, zome, saome, swome, seome, sdome, sxome, szome, siome, s9ome, s0ome, spome, slome, sime, s9me, s0me, spme, slme, soime, so9me, so0me, sopme, solme, sonme, sojme, sokme, so,me, so me, sone, soje, soke, so,e, so e, somne, somje, somke, som,e, som e, somwe, som3e, som4e, somre, somse, somde, somw, som3, som4, somr, soms, somd, somew, some3, some4, somer, somes, somed.

Other Usage Examples

A good day is one where I can not just read a book, but write a review of it. Maybe today I'll be able to do that. I get for some reason somewhat stronger when the sun starts to go down. Dusk is a good time for me. I'm crepuscular.

A lawyer without history or literature is a mechanic, a mere working mason if he possesses some knowledge of these, he may venture to call himself an architect.

A handful of works in history have had a direct impact on social policy: one or two works of Dickens, some of Zola, 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' and, in modern drama, Larry Kramer's 'The Normal Heart.'

A fact must be assimilated with, or discriminated fromm, some other fact or facts, in order to be raised to the dignity of a truth, and made to convey the least knowledge to the mind.

A clear cold morning with high wind: we caught in a trap a large gray wolf, and last night obtained in the same way a fox who had for some time infested the neighbourhood of the fort.

A definition of poetry can only determine what poetry should be and not what poetry actually was and is otherwise the most concise formula would be: Poetry is that which at some time and some place was thus named.

A Latin teacher told me I might make a good actress, and that stuck in my memory. I did some modeling, and Polanski gave me that small part.

A big part of being in a wedding is the financial obligation, and that's something that people don't really talk about, but if you're asked to be in a wedding, you're gonna have to fork over some cash.

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