sink

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[sink]

When things sink, they settle or drop to a lower level. If your kayak has a leak, it might fill with water and sink to the bottom of the lake.

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To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west.

Noun
a covered cistern; waste water and sewage flow into it

Noun
plumbing fixture consisting of a water basin fixed to a wall or floor and having a drainpipe

Noun
a depression in the ground communicating with a subterranean passage (especially in limestone) and formed by solution or by collapse of a cavern roof

Noun
(technology) a process that acts to absorb or remove energy or a substance from a system; "the ocean is a sink for carbon dioxide"

Verb
fall heavily or suddenly; decline markedly; "The real estate market fell off"

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Verb
embed deeply; "She sank her fingers into the soft sand"; "He buried his head in her lap"

Verb
descend into or as if into some soft substance or place; "He sank into bed"; "She subsided into the chair"

Verb
pass into a specified state or condition; "He sank into Nirvana"

Verb
fall or drop to a lower place or level; "He sank to his knees"

Verb
cause to sink; "The Japanese sank American ships in Pearl Harbor"

Verb
fall or sink heavily; "He slumped onto the couch"; "My spirits sank"

Verb
go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned"

Verb
appear to move downward; "The sun dipped below the horizon"; "The setting sun sank below the tree line"


v. i.
To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west.

v. i.
To enter deeply; to fall or retire beneath or below the surface; to penetrate.

v. i.
Hence, to enter so as to make an abiding impression; to enter completely.

v. i.
To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fall slowly, as so the ground, from weakness or from an overburden; to fail in strength; to decline; to decay; to decrease.

v. i.
To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height.

v. t.
To cause to sink; to put under water; to immerse or submerge in a fluid; as, to sink a ship.

v. t.
Figuratively: To cause to decline; to depress; to degrade; hence, to ruin irretrievably; to destroy, as by drowping; as, to sink one's reputation.

v. t.
To make (a depression) by digging, delving, or cutting, etc.; as, to sink a pit or a well; to sink a die.

v. t.
To bring low; to reduce in quantity; to waste.

v. t.
To conseal and appropriate.

v. t.
To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore.

v. t.
To reduce or extinguish by payment; as, to sink the national debt.

n.
A drain to carry off filthy water; a jakes.

n.
A shallow box or vessel of wood, stone, iron, or other material, connected with a drain, and used for receiving filthy water, etc., as in a kitchen.

n.
A hole or low place in land or rock, where waters sink and are lost; -- called also sink hole.


Sink

Sink , v. i. [imp. Sunk , or (Sank ); p. p. Sunk (obs. Sunken, -- now used as adj.); p. pr. & vb. n. Sinking.] [OE. sinken, AS. sincan; akin to D. zinken, OS. sincan, G. sinken, Icel. s'94kkva, Dan. synke, Sw. sjunka, Goth. siggan, and probably to E. silt. Cf. Silt.] 1. To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west.
I sink in deep mire.
2. To enter deeply; to fall or retire beneath or below the surface; to penetrate.
The stone sunk into his forehead.
3. Hence, to enter so as to make an abiding impression; to enter completely.
Let these sayings sink down into your ears.
4. To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fall slowly, as so the ground, from weakness or from an overburden; to fail in strength; to decline; to decay; to decrease.
I think our country sinks beneath the yoke.
He sunk down in his chariot.
Let not the fire sink or slacken.
5. To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height.
The Alps and Pyreneans sink before him.
Syn. -- To fall; subside; drop; droop; lower; decline; decay; decrease; lessen.

Sink

Sink, v. t. 1. To cause to sink; to put under water; to immerse or submerge in a fluid; as, to sink a ship.
[The Athenians] fell upon the wings and sank a single ship.
2. Figuratively: To cause to decline; to depress; to degrade; hence, to ruin irretrievably; to destroy, as by drowping; as, to sink one's reputation.
I raise of sink, imprison or set free.
If I have a conscience, let it sink me.
Thy cruel and unnatural lust of power Has sunk thy father more than all his years.
3. To make (a depression) by digging, delving, or cutting, etc.; as, to sink a pit or a well; to sink a die. 4. To bring low; to reduce in quantity; to waste.
You sunk the river repeated draughts.
5. To conseal and appropriate. [Slang]
If sent with ready money to buy anything, and you happen to be out of pocket, sink the money, and take up the goods on account.
6. To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore.
A courtly willingness to sink obnoxious truths.
7. To reduce or extinguish by payment; as, to sink the national debt.

Sink

Sink, n. 1. A drain to carry off filthy water; a jakes. 2. A shallow box or vessel of wood, stone, iron, or other material, connected with a drain, and used for receiving filthy water, etc., as in a kitchen. 3. A hole or low place in land or rock, where waters sink and are lost; -- called also sink hole. [U. S.] Sink hole. (a) The opening to a sink drain. (b) A cesspool. (c) Same as Sink, n., 3.

To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west.

To cause to sink; to put under water; to immerse or submerge in a fluid; as, to sink a ship.

A drain to carry off filthy water; a jakes.

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Usage Examples

The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the wars of elements, The wrecks of matter, and the crush of worlds.

Most actors want to sink their teeth into amazing material.

Poverty is uncomfortable but nine times out of ten the best thing that can happen to a young man is to be tossed overboard and compelled to sink or swim.

To have faith is to trust yourself to the water. When you swim you don't grab hold of the water, because if you do you will sink and drown. Instead you relax, and float.

I am one of those who would rather sink with faith than swim without it.

I think the biggest thing is clean as you go. Wash all your knives, cutting boards, dishes, when you are done cooking, not look at a sink full of dishes after you are done. Cleaning as you go helps keep away cross contamination and you avoid having food borne bacteria.

Every man's dream is to be able to sink into the arms of a woman without also falling into her hands.

Beware of little expenses. A small leak will sink a great ship.

Misspelled Form

sink, asink, wsink, esink, dsink, xsink, zsink, aink, wink, eink, dink, xink, zink, saink, swink, seink, sdink, sxink, szink, suink, s8ink, s9ink, soink, sjink, skink, sunk, s8nk, s9nk, sonk, sjnk, sknk, siunk, si8nk, si9nk, sionk, sijnk, siknk, sibnk, sihnk, sijnk, simnk, si nk, sibk, sihk, sijk, simk, si k, sinbk, sinhk, sinjk, sinmk, sin k, sinjk, sinik, sinok, sinlk, sinmk, sinj, sini, sino, sinl, sinm, sinkj, sinki, sinko, sinkl, sinkm.

Other Usage Examples

Basically my wife was immature. I'd be at home in the bath and she'd come in and sink my boats.

But inspiration? - That's when you come home from abroad and are asked: Well, have you found inspiration? - and fortunately you haven't. But the impressions sink in, of course, and may emerge later: None of us has invented the house that was done many thousands of years ago.

This morning of the small snow I count the blessings, the leak in the faucet which makes of the sink time, the drop of the water on water.

Poetry seems to sink into us the way prose doesn't. I can still quote verses I learned when I was very young, but I have trouble remembering one line of a novel I just finished reading.

Save for thee and thy lessons, man in society would everywhere sink into a sad compound of the fiend and the wild beast and this fallen world would be as certainly a moral as a natural wilderness.

Science was something that really caught my attention. It was something I really could sink my teeth into.

When making music I sink myself into the process as deeply as I can and forget all of the success.

We should feel sorrow, but not sink under its oppression.

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