sight

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[Sight]

Your sight is your ability to see. If you're maneuvering through the house at midnight using your shins to locate the furniture, you'll appreciate your sight that much more. You could also turn a light on.

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The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view; as, to gain sight of land.

Noun
the act of looking or seeing or observing; "he tried to get a better view of it"; "his survey of the battlefield was limited"

Noun
a optical instrument for aiding the eye in aiming, as on a firearm or surveying instrument

Noun
the range of vision; "out of sight of land"

Noun
the ability to see; the faculty of vision

Noun
an instance of visual perception; "the sight of his wife brought him back to reality"; "the train was an unexpected sight"

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Noun
a range of mental vision; "in his sight she could do no wrong"

Noun
anything that is seen; "he was a familiar sight on the television"; "they went to Paris to see the sights"

Noun
(often followed by `of'') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "it must have cost plenty"

Verb
catch sight of; to perceive with the eyes; "he caught sight of the king''s men coming over the ridge"


v. t.
The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view; as, to gain sight of land.

v. t.
The power of seeing; the faculty of vision, or of perceiving objects by the instrumentality of the eyes.

v. t.
The state of admitting unobstructed vision; visibility; open view; region which the eye at one time surveys; space through which the power of vision extends; as, an object within sight.

v. t.
A spectacle; a view; a show; something worth seeing.

v. t.
The instrument of seeing; the eye.

v. t.
Inspection; examination; as, a letter intended for the sight of only one person.

v. t.
Mental view; opinion; judgment; as, in their sight it was harmless.

v. t.
A small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained; as, the sight of a quadrant.

v. t.
A small piece of metal, fixed or movable, on the breech, muzzle, center, or trunnion of a gun, or on the breech and the muzzle of a rifle, pistol, etc., by means of which the eye is guided in aiming.

v. t.
In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame or the like, the open space, the opening.

v. t.
A great number, quantity, or sum; as, a sight of money.

v. t.
To get sight of; to see; as, to sight land; to sight a wreck.

v. t.
To look at through a sight; to see accurately; as, to sight an object, as a star.

v. t.
To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight; as, to sight a rifle or a cannon.

v. i.
To take aim by a sight.


Sight

Sight , n. [OE. sight, sit, siht, AS. siht, gesiht, gesih, gesieh, gesyh; akin to D. gezicht, G. sicht, gesicht, Dan. sigte, Sw. sigt, from the root of E. see. See See, v. t.] 1. The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view; as, to gain sight of land.
A cloud received him out of their sight.
2. The power of seeing; the faculty of vision, or of perceiving objects by the instrumentality of the eyes.
Thy sight is young, And thou shalt read when mine begin to dazzle.
O loss of sight, of thee I most complain!
3. The state of admitting unobstructed vision; visibility; open view; region which the eye at one time surveys; space through which the power of vision extends; as, an object within sight. 4. A spectacle; a view; a show; something worth seeing.
Moses said, I will now turn aside and see this great sight, why the bush is not burnt.
They never saw a sight so fair.
5. The instrument of seeing; the eye.
Why cloud they not their sights?
6. Inspection; examination; as, a letter intended for the sight of only one person. 7. Mental view; opinion; judgment; as, in their sight it was harmless. Wake.
That which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.
8. A small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained; as, the sight of a quadrant.
Thier eyes of fire sparking through sights of steel.
9. A small piece of metal, fixed or movable, on the breech, muzzle, center, or trunnion of a gun, or on the breech and the muzzle of a rifle, pistol, etc., by means of which the eye is guided in aiming. Farrow. 10. In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame or the like, the open space, the opening. 11. A great number, quantity, or sum; as, a sight of money. [Now colloquial] &hand; Sight in this last sense was formerly employed in the best usage. "A sight of lawyers." Latimer.
A wonder sight of flowers.
At sight, as soon as seen, or presented to sight; as, a draft payable at sight: to read Greek at sight; to shoot a person at sight. -- Front sight (Firearms), the sight nearest the muzzle. -- Open sight. (Firearms) (a) A front sight through which the objects aimed at may be seen, in distinction from one that hides the object. (b) A rear sight having an open notch instead of an aperture. -- Peep sight, Rear sight. See under Peep, and Rear. -- Sight draft, an order, or bill of exchange, directing the payment of money at sight. -- To take sight, to take aim; to look for the purpose of directing a piece of artillery, or the like. Syn. -- Vision; view; show; spectacle; representation; exhibition.

Sight

Sight , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sighted; p. pr. & vb. n. Sighting.] 1. To get sight of; to see; as, to sight land; to sight a wreck. Kane. 2. To look at through a sight; to see accurately; as, to sight an object, as a star. 3. To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight; as, to sight a rifle or a cannon.

Sight

Sight, v. i. (Mil.) To take aim by a sight.

The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view; as, to gain sight of land.

To get sight of; to see; as, to sight land; to sight a wreck.

To take aim by a sight.

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Usage Examples

Anger and jealousy can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love.

Beauty is all very well at first sight but who ever looks at it when it has been in the house three days?

A day spent without the sight or sound of beauty, the contemplation of mystery, or the search of truth or perfection is a poverty-stricken day and a succession of such days is fatal to human life.

I believe that access to a university education should be based on the ability to learn, not what people can afford. I think there is no more nauseating a sight than politicians pulling up the ladder of opportunity behind them.

I come now to tell you for what I am brought here to die, and to give you an account of my faith, which I shall do as in the sight of the living God before whom I am shortly to stand.

Famous people come up to me, but I don't know who they are because my sight is so bad. It's always at the pool of the Four Seasons in Beverly Hills when I don't have my lenses in and my glasses are in my room.

Another parent's different approach raises the possibility that you've made a mistake with your child. We simply can't tolerate that because we fear that any mistake, no matter how minor, could have devastating consequences. So we proclaim the superiority of our own choices. We've lost sight of the fact that people have preferences.

Misspelled Form

sight, asight, wsight, esight, dsight, xsight, zsight, aight, wight, eight, dight, xight, zight, saight, swight, seight, sdight, sxight, szight, suight, s8ight, s9ight, soight, sjight, skight, sught, s8ght, s9ght, soght, sjght, skght, siught, si8ght, si9ght, sioght, sijght, sikght, sifght, sitght, siyght, sihght, sibght, sivght, sifht, sitht, siyht, sihht, sibht, sivht, sigfht, sigtht, sigyht, sighht, sigbht, sigvht, sigght, sigyht, siguht, sigjht, signht, siggt, sigyt, sigut, sigjt, signt, sighgt, sighyt, sighut, sighjt, sighnt, sighrt, sigh5t, sigh6t, sighyt, sighgt, sighr, sigh5, sigh6, sighy, sighg, sightr, sight5, sight6, sighty, sightg.

Other Usage Examples

Friendship is a word, the very sight of which in print makes the heart warm.

For there is no defense for a man who, in the excess of his wealth, has kicked the great altar of Justice out of sight.

I only hope that we don't lose sight of one thing - that it was all started by a mouse.

After marriage, a woman's sight becomes so keen that she can see right through her husband without looking at him, and a man's so dull that he can look right through his wife without seeing her.

And what we've lost sight of is that performing manual labor with your hands is one of the most incredibly satisfying and positive things you can do.

But, I would be naive not to recognize the number of musicians who tell me they have been influenced by me and sight me - as well as Alex and Neil - as a musician who has been a positive influence on their playing.

From reading over the notes for each session it was apparent that there had been improvement by more or less regular steps from almost complete terror at sight of the rabbit to a completely positive response with no signs of disturbance.

A man willing to work, and unable to find work, is perhaps the saddest sight that fortune's inequality exhibits under this sun.

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