sell

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[sell]

To sell is to exchange a thing or a service for money. You could sell lemonade from a table on the sidewalk, or sell hotdogs at a baseball game.

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Self.

Noun
the activity of persuading someone to buy; "it was a hard sell"

Verb
persuade somebody to accept something; "The French try to sell us their image as great lovers"

Verb
give up for a price or reward; "She sold her principles for a successful career"

Verb
exchange or deliver for money or its equivalent; "He sold his house in January"; "She sells her body to survive and support her drug habit"

Verb
do business; offer for sale as for one''s livelihood; "She deals in gold"; "The brothers sell shoes"

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Verb
deliver to an enemy by treachery; "Judas sold Jesus"; "The spy betrayed his country"

Verb
be sold at a certain price or in a certain way; "These books sell like hot cakes"

Verb
be responsible for the sale of; "All her publicity sold the products"

Verb
be approved of or gain acceptance; "The new idea sold well in certain circles"


n.
Self.

n.
A sill.

n.
A cell; a house.

n.
A saddle for a horse.

n.
A throne or lofty seat.

v. t.
To transfer to another for an equivalent; to give up for a valuable consideration; to dispose of in return for something, especially for money.

v. t.
To make a matter of bargain and sale of; to accept a price or reward for, as for a breach of duty, trust, or the like; to betray.

v. t.
To impose upon; to trick; to deceive; to make a fool of; to cheat.

v. i.
To practice selling commodities.

v. i.
To be sold; as, corn sells at a good price.

n.
An imposition; a cheat; a hoax.


Sell

Sell , n. Self. [Obs. or Scot.] B. Jonson.

Sell

Sell, n. A sill. [Obs.] Chaucer.

Sell

Sell, n. A cell; a house. [Obs.] Chaucer.

Sell

Sell, n. [F. selle, L. sella, akin to sedere to sit. See Sit.] 1. A saddle for a horse. [Obs.]
He left his lofty steed with golden self.
2. A throne or lofty seat. [Obs.] Fairfax.

Sell

Sell, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sold ; p. pr. & vb. n. Selling.] [OE. sellen, sillen, AS. sellan, syllan, to give, to deliver; akin to OS. sellian, OFries. sella, OHG. sellen, Icel. selja to hand over, to sell, Sw. s'84lja to sell, Dan. slge, Goth. saljan to offer a sacrifice; all from a noun akin to E. sale. Cf. Sale.] 1. To transfer to another for an equivalent; to give up for a valuable consideration; to dispose of in return for something, especially for money.
If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor.
I am changed; I'll go sell all my land.
&hand; Sell is corellative to buy, as one party buys what the other sells. It is distinguished usually from exchange or barter, in which one commodity is given for another; whereas in selling the consideration is usually money, or its representative in current notes. 2. To make a matter of bargain and sale of; to accept a price or reward for, as for a breach of duty, trust, or the like; to betray.
You would have sold your king to slaughter.
3. To impose upon; to trick; to deceive; to make a fool of; to cheat. [Slang] Dickens. To sell one's life dearly, to cause much loss to those who take one's life, as by killing a number of one's assailants. -- To sell (anything) out, to dispose of it wholly or entirely; as, he had sold out his corn, or his interest in a business.

Sell

Sell, v. i. 1. To practice selling commodities.
I will buy with you, sell with you; . . . but I will not eat with you.
2. To be sold; as, corn sells at a good price. To sell out, to sell one's whole stockk in trade or one's entire interest in a property or a business.

Sell

Sell, n. An imposition; a cheat; a hoax. [Colloq.]

Self.

A sill.

A cell; a house.

A saddle for a horse.

To transfer to another for an equivalent; to give up for a valuable consideration; to dispose of in return for something, especially for money.

To practice selling commodities.

An imposition; a cheat; a hoax.

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Usage Examples

For an actor, you're rejected eight or ten times a day. All you've got to sell is yourself. You're not selling products, they're not turning down a car, they're turning you down. Most people can't handle that. Most people are essentially not set up that way.

During the Depression, my dad made radios to sell to make extra money. Nobody had any money to buy the radios, so he would trade them for dogs. He built kennels in the backyard, and he cared for the dogs.

At one point my dad called me and said, 'You have always been a great salesman. I think it's time you come home and sell swimming pools.'

Fully 57 percent of American college students are women. Life insurance companies sell more policies to women than to men. As women continue to draw on experience and education, they're accelerating their numbers in upper management, too.

Don't gamble take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it till it goes up, then sell it. If it don't go up, don't buy it.

'Survivor' wouldn't have happened had I not gone out there and helped CBS to sell sponsors to finance the first one. Part of my thinking on 'Survivor' was that it should have rewards that are corporate brands. A Big Mac, one thimble-full of Coca-Cola.

Food was always a big part of my life. My grandfather was one of 14 kids, and his parents had a pasta factory, so as a kid, he and his siblings would sell pasta door to door. After he became a movie producer, he opened up De Laurentiis Food Stores - one in Los Angeles and one in New York.

Misspelled Form

sell, asell, wsell, esell, dsell, xsell, zsell, aell, well, eell, dell, xell, zell, saell, swell, seell, sdell, sxell, szell, swell, s3ell, s4ell, srell, ssell, sdell, swll, s3ll, s4ll, srll, ssll, sdll, sewll, se3ll, se4ll, serll, sesll, sedll, sekll, seoll, sepll, se:ll, sekl, seol, sepl, se:l, selkl, selol, selpl, sel:l, selkl, selol, selpl, sel:l, selk, selo, selp, sel:, sellk, sello, sellp, sell:.

Other Usage Examples

Don't give up. Don't lose hope. Don't sell out.

But men are so full of greed today, they'll sell anything for a little piece of money.

Anyone who wants to sell you overnight success or wealth is not interested in your success they are interested in your money.

Go miser go, for money sell your soul. Trade wares for wares and trudge from pole to pole, So others may say when you are dead and gone. See what a vast estate he left his son.

Back then people closed their eyes and listened to music. Today there's a lot of images that go with the music. A lot of music is crap and it's all commercial and the images are all trying to sell the record.

Attacks on a politician's identity - questioning Romney's religion, say, or Obama's birthplace - tend to come when an opponent is desperate and can't sell himself.

Don't sell yourself short because without that you can't go far in life because after sports the only thing you know is sports and you can't do anything else with that.

Foreign policy is about trying to deliver for them the best possible economic benefits, the chance to travel, to study, to work, the opportunity through trade to be able to sell their goods and services and as much peace and security so they can live and bring their kids up so they don't have to fear war.

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