seed

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[Seed]

A seed is basically a baby plant it's the way plants reproduce. One tiny sunflower seed can potentially grow into a sunflower that's ten feet tall.

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A ripened ovule, consisting of an embryo with one or more integuments, or coverings; as, an apple seed; a currant seed. By germination it produces a new plant.

Noun
the thick white fluid containing spermatozoa that is ejaculated by the male genital tract

Noun
anything that provides inspiration for later work

Noun
one of the outstanding players in a tournament

Noun
a mature fertilized plant ovule consisting of an embryo and its food source and having a protective coat or testa

Noun
a small hard fruit

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Verb
remove the seeds from; "seed grapes"

Verb
inoculate with microorganisms

Verb
sprinkle with silver iodide particles to disperse and cause rain; "seed clouds"

Verb
distribute (players or teams) so that outstanding teams or players will not meet in the early rounds

Verb
place (seeds) in or on the ground for future growth; "She sowed sunflower seeds"

Verb
go to seed; shed seeds; "The dandelions went to seed"

Verb
bear seeds

Verb
help (an enterprise) in its early stages of development by providing seed money


pl.
of Seed

n.
A ripened ovule, consisting of an embryo with one or more integuments, or coverings; as, an apple seed; a currant seed. By germination it produces a new plant.

n.
Any small seedlike fruit, though it may consist of a pericarp, or even a calyx, as well as the seed proper; as, parsnip seed; thistle seed.

n.
The generative fluid of the male; semen; sperm; -- not used in the plural.

n.
That from which anything springs; first principle; original; source; as, the seeds of virtue or vice.

n.
The principle of production.

n.
Progeny; offspring; children; descendants; as, the seed of Abraham; the seed of David.

n.
Race; generation; birth.

v. t.
To sprinkle with seed; to plant seeds in; to sow; as, to seed a field.

v. t.
To cover thinly with something scattered; to ornament with seedlike decorations.


Seed

Seed , n.; pl. Seed or Seeds . [OE. seed, sed, AS. sd, fr. s'bewan to sow; akin to D. zaad seed, G. saat, Icel. s'be, si, Goth. manasps seed of men. world. See Sow to scatter seed, and cf. Colza.] 1. (Bot.) (a) A ripened ovule, consisting of an embryo with one or more integuments, or coverings; as, an apple seed; a currant seed. By germination it produces a new plant. (b) Any small seedlike fruit, though it may consist of a pericarp, or even a calyx, as well as the seed proper; as, parsnip seed; thistle seed.
And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed is in itself.
&hand; The seed proper has an outer and an inner coat, and within these the kernel or nucleus. The kernel is either the embryo alone, or the embryo inclosed in the albumen, which is the material for the nourishment of the developing embryo. The scar on a seed, left where the stem parted from it, is called the hilum, and the closed orifice of the ovule, the micropyle. 2. (Physiol.) The generative fluid of the male; semen; sperm; -- not used in the plural. 3. That from which anything springs; first principle; original; source; as, the seeds of virtue or vice. 4. The principle of production.
Praise of great acts he scatters as a seed, Which may the like in coming ages breed.
5. Progeny; offspring; children; descendants; as, the seed of Abraham; the seed of David. &hand; In this sense the word is applied to one person, or to any number collectively, and admits of the plural form, though rarely used in the plural. 6. Race; generation; birth.
Of mortal seed they were not held.
Seed bag (Artesian well), a packing to prevent percolation of water down the bore hole. It consists of a bag encircling the tubing and filled with flax seed, which swells when wet and fills the space between the tubing and the sides of the hole. -- Seed bud (Bot.), the germ or rudiment of the plant in the embryo state; the ovule. -- Seed coat (Bot.), the covering of a seed. -- Seed corn, ∨ Seed grain (Bot.), corn or grain for seed. -- Seed down (Bot.), the soft hairs on certain seeds, as cotton seed. -- Seed drill. See 6th Drill, 2 (a). -- Seed eater (Zo'94l.), any finch of the genera Sporophila, and Crithagra. They feed mainly on seeds. -- Seed gall (Zo'94l.), any gall which resembles a seed, formed, on the leaves of various plants, usually by some species of Phylloxera. -- Seed leaf (Bot.), a cotyledon. -- Seed lobe (Bot.), a cotyledon; a seed leaf. -- Seed oil, oil expressed from the seeds of plants. -- Seed oyster, a young oyster, especially when of a size suitable for transplantation to a new locality. -- Seed pearl, a small pearl of little value. -- Seed plat, ∨ Seed plot, the ground on which seeds are sown, to produce plants for transplanting; a nursery. -- Seed stalk (Bot.), the stalk of an ovule or seed; a funicle. -- Seed tick (Zo'94l.), one of several species of ticks resembling seeds in form and color. -- Seed vessel (Bot.), that part of a plant which contains the seeds; a pericarp. -- Seed weevil (Zo'94l.), any one of numerous small weevels, especially those of the genus Apion, which live in the seeds of various plants. -- Seed wool, cotton wool not yet cleansed of its seeds. [Southern U.S.]

Seed

Seed, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Seeded; p. pr. & vb. n. Seeding.] 1. To sprinkle with seed; to plant seeds in; to sow; as, to seed a field. 2. To cover thinly with something scattered; to ornament with seedlike decorations.
A sable mantle seeded with waking eyes.
To seed down, to sow with grass seed.

A ripened ovule, consisting of an embryo with one or more integuments, or coverings; as, an apple seed; a currant seed. By germination it produces a new plant.

To sprinkle with seed; to plant seeds in; to sow; as, to seed a field.

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Usage Examples

Earth teach me to forget myself as melted snow forgets its life. Earth teach me resignation as the leaves which die in the fall. Earth teach me courage as the tree which stands all alone. Earth teach me regeneration as the seed which rises in the spring.

Education is not the piling on of learning, information, data, facts, skills, or abilities - that's training or instruction - but is rather making visible what is hidden as a seed.

Every adversity, every failure, every heartache carries with it the seed on an equal or greater benefit.

Every adversity, every failure, and every heartache, carries with it the Seed of an equivalent or greater Benefit.

Everyone should be commended for allowing people to make disasters, to make failures - you've just got to be sure that it's a magnificent failure and that, by creating a magnificent failure, you plant the seed.

Faith is not a notion, but a real strong essential hunger, an attracting or magnetic desire of Christ, which as it proceeds from a seed of the divine nature in us, so it attracts and unites with its like.

Fear of things invisible in the natural seed of that which everyone in himself calleth religion.

Misspelled Form

seed, aseed, wseed, eseed, dseed, xseed, zseed, aeed, weed, eeed, deed, xeed, zeed, saeed, sweed, seeed, sdeed, sxeed, szeed, sweed, s3eed, s4eed, sreed, sseed, sdeed, swed, s3ed, s4ed, sred, ssed, sded, sewed, se3ed, se4ed, sered, sesed, seded, sewed, se3ed, se4ed, sered, sesed, seded, sewd, se3d, se4d, serd, sesd, sedd, seewd, see3d, see4d, seerd, seesd, seedd, seesd, seeed, seefd, seexd, seecd, sees, seee, seef, seex, seec, seeds, seede, seedf, seedx, seedc.

Other Usage Examples

Anyone can count the seeds in an apple, but only God can count the number of apples in a seed.

Every great man, every successful man, no matter what the field of endeavor, has known the magic that lies in these words: every adversity has the seed of an equivalent or greater benefit.

Happiness held is the seed Happiness shared is the flower.

Fear is a question: What are you afraid of, and why? Just as the seed of health is in illness, because illness contains information, your fears are a treasure house of self-knowledge if you explore them.

A good question is never answered. It is not a bolt to be tightened into place but a seed to be planted and to bear more seed toward the hope of greening the landscape of idea.

As regards the individual nature, woman is defective and misbegotten, for the active power of the male seed tends to the production of a perfect likeness in the masculine sex while the production of a woman comes from defect in the active power.

A committee is organic rather than mechanical in its nature: it is not a structure but a plant. It takes root and grows, it flowers, wilts, and dies, scattering the seed from which other committees will bloom in their turn.

Always seek out the seed of triumph in every adversity.

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