sea

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[sea]

A sea is a huge body of salt water, typically a part of the ocean that's near land. Much grander than a lake or river, a sea can appear open and endless when you view it from the shore.

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One of the larger bodies of salt water, less than an ocean, found on the earth's surface; a body of salt water of second rank, generally forming part of, or connecting with, an ocean or a larger sea; as, the Mediterranean Sea; the Sea of Marmora; the North Sea; the Carribean Sea.

Noun
a division of an ocean or a large body of salt water partially enclosed by land

Noun
turbulent water with swells of considerable size; "heavy seas"

Noun
anything apparently limitless in quantity or volume


n.
One of the larger bodies of salt water, less than an ocean, found on the earth's surface; a body of salt water of second rank, generally forming part of, or connecting with, an ocean or a larger sea; as, the Mediterranean Sea; the Sea of Marmora; the North Sea; the Carribean Sea.

n.
An inland body of water, esp. if large or if salt or brackish; as, the Caspian Sea; the Sea of Aral; sometimes, a small fresh-water lake; as, the Sea of Galilee.

n.
The ocean; the whole body of the salt water which covers a large part of the globe.

n.
The swell of the ocean or other body of water in a high wind; motion of the water's surface; also, a single wave; a billow; as, there was a high sea after the storm; the vessel shipped a sea.

n.
A great brazen laver in the temple at Jerusalem; -- so called from its size.

n.
Fig.: Anything resembling the sea in vastness; as, a sea of glory.


Sea

Sea , n. [OE. see, AS. s&aemac;; akin to D. zee, OS. & OHG. s&emac;o, G. see, OFries. se, Dan. s'94, Sw. sj'94, Icel. s'91r, Goth. saiws, and perhaps to L. saevus firce, savage. &root; 151 a.] 1. One of the larger bodies of salt water, less than an ocean, found on the earth's surface; a body of salt water of second rank, generally forming part of, or connecting with, an ocean or a larger sea; as, the Mediterranean Sea; the Sea of Marmora; the North Sea; the Carribean Sea. 2. An inland body of water, esp. if large or if salt or brackish; as, the Caspian Sea; the Sea of Aral; sometimes, a small fresh-water lake; as, the Sea of Galilee. 3. The ocean; the whole body of the salt water which covers a large part of the globe.
I marvel how the fishes live in the sea.
Ambiguous between sea and land The river horse and scaly crocodile.
4. The swell of the ocean or other body of water in a high wind; motion of the water's surface; also, a single wave; a billow; as, there was a high sea after the storm; the vessel shipped a sea. 5. (Jewish Antiq.) A great brazen laver in the temple at Jerusalem; -- so called from its size.
He made a molten sea of ten cubits from brim to brim, round in compass, and five cubits the height thereof.
6. Fig.: Anything resembling the sea in vastness; as, a sea of glory. Shak.
All the space . . . was one sea of heads.
&hand; Sea is often used in the composition of words of obvious signification; as, sea-bathed, sea-beaten, sea-bound, sea-bred, sea-circled, sealike, sea-nursed, sea-tossed, sea-walled, sea-worn, and the like. It is also used either adjectively or in combination with substantives; as, sea bird, sea-bird, or seabird, sea acorn, or sea-acorn. At sea, upon the ocean; away from land; figuratively, without landmarks for guidance; lost; at the mercy of circumstances. "To say the old man was at sea would be too feeble an expression." G. W. Cable -- At full sea at the height of flood tide; hence, at the height. "But now God's mercy was at full sea." Jer. Taylor. -- Beyond seas, ∨ Beyond the sea ∨ the seas (Law), out of the state, territory, realm, or country. Wharton. -- Half seas over, half drunk. [Colloq.] Spectator. -- Heavy sea, a sea in which the waves run high. -- Long sea, a sea characterized by the uniform and steady motion of long and extensive waves. -- Short sea, a sea in which the waves are short, broken, and irregular, so as to produce a tumbling or jerking motion. -- To go to sea, a adopt the calling or occupation of a sailor.

One of the larger bodies of salt water, less than an ocean, found on the earth's surface; a body of salt water of second rank, generally forming part of, or connecting with, an ocean or a larger sea; as, the Mediterranean Sea; the Sea of Marmora; the North Sea; the Carribean Sea.

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Usage Examples

But having said that, there's also a sea change in attitude towards media.

Duty is the great business of a sea officer all private considerations must give way to it, however painful it may be.

Every summer my husband and I pack our suitcases, load our kids into the car, and drive from tense, crowded New York City to my family's cottage in Maine. It's on an island, with stretches of sea and sandy beaches, rocky coasts, and pine trees. We barbecue, swim, lie around, and try to do nothing.

Civilization grew in the beginning from the minute that we had communication - particularly communication by sea that enabled people to get inspiration and ideas from each other and to exchange basic raw materials.

For life and death are one, even as the river and the sea are one.

From too much love of living, From hope and fear set free, We thank with brief thanksgiving Whatever gods may be That no life lives for ever That dead men rise up never That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea.

An inexhaustible good nature is one of the most precious gifts of heaven, spreading itself like oil over the troubled sea of thought, and keeping the mind smooth and equable in the roughest weather.

And when the day arrives I'll become the sky and I'll become the sea and the sea will come to kiss me for I am going home. Nothing can stop me now.

Misspelled Form

sea, asea, wsea, esea, dsea, xsea, zsea, aea, wea, eea, dea, xea, zea, saea, swea, seea, sdea, sxea, szea, swea, s3ea, s4ea, srea, ssea, sdea, swa, s3a, s4a, sra, ssa, sda, sewa, se3a, se4a, sera, sesa, seda, seqa, sewa, sesa, seza, seq, sew, ses, sez, seaq, seaw, seas, seaz.

Other Usage Examples

All handling by IPCC of the Sea Level questions have been done in a way that cannot be accepted and that certainly not concur with modern knowledge of the mode and mechanism of sea level changes.

Fifty percent of our country that we own, have all legal jurisdiction, have all rights to do whatever we want, lies beneath the sea and we have better maps of Mars than that 50 percent.

A woman knows the face of the man she loves as a sailor knows the open sea.

But let there be spaces in your togetherness and let the winds of the heavens dance between you. Love one another but make not a bond of love: let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls.

Aside from what it teaches you, there is simply the indescribable degree of peace that can be achieved on a sailing vessel at sea. I guess a combination of hard work and the seemingly infinite expanse of the sea - the profound solitude - that does it for me.

At sea a fellow comes out. Salt water is like wine, in that respect.

Even in our day, science suspects beyond the Polar seas, at the very circle of the Arctic Pole, the existence of a sea which never freezes and a continent which is ever green.

A journey by Sea and Land, Five Hundred Miles, is not undertaken without money.

Buonaparte has often made his boast that our fleet would be worn out by keeping the sea and that his was kept in order and increasing by staying in port but know he finds, I fancy, if Emperors hear the truth, that his fleet suffers more in a night than ours in one year.

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