sale

...
[sale]

A sale is what occurs whenever an object or service is given in return for a payment of money. The sale of your old bike will happen more quickly if you price it at $50 instead of $500.

...

See 1st Sallow.

Noun
a particular instance of selling; "he has just made his first sale"; "they had to complete the sale before the banks closed"

Noun
the general activity of selling; "they tried to boost sales"; "laws limit the sale of handguns"

Noun
an occasion (usually brief) for buying at specially reduced prices; "they held a sale to reduce their inventory"; "I got some great bargains at their annual sale"

Noun
an agreement (or contract) in which property is transferred from the seller (vendor) to the buyer (vendee) for a fixed price in money (paid or agreed to be paid by the buyer); "the salesman faxed the sales agreement to his home office"

Noun
the state of being purchasable; offered or exhibited for selling; "you''ll find vitamin C for sale at most pharmacies"; "the new line of cars will soon be on sale"

...

n.
See 1st Sallow.

v. t.
The act of selling; the transfer of property, or a contract to transfer the ownership of property, from one person to another for a valuable consideration, or for a price in money.

v. t.
Opportunity of selling; demand; market.

v. t.
Public disposal to the highest bidder, or exposure of goods in market; auction.


Sale

Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust. 4, under Cross. (b) (Bot.) A low North American shrub (Ascyrum Crux-Andr'91, the petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's cross. Gray. -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust. 6, under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly so called because it was supposed to have been cured by the intercession of Saint Anthony. -- Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the groundnut (Bunium flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it, and St. Anthony was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's turnip (Bot.), the bulbous crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Barnaby's thistle (Bot.), a kind of knapeweed (Centaurea solstitialis) flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Bernard (Zo'94l.), a breed of large, handsome dogs celebrated for strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at the Hospice of St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe and America. There are two races, the smooth-haired and the rough-haired. See Illust. under Dog. -- Saint Catharine's flower (Bot.), the plant love-a-mist. See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's heath (Bot.), a heatherlike plant (Dab'91cia polifolia), named from an Irish saint. -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint Elmo's fire, a luminious, flamelike appearance, sometimes seen in dark, tempestuous nights, at some prominent point on a ship, particularly at the masthead and the yardams. It has also been observed on land, and is due to the discharge of electricity from elevated or pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a Corposant; a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or a double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a field argent, the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign, a red cross on a white field with a union jack in the upper corner next the mast. It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint George's flag, a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the union jack; used as the sign of the presence and command of an admiral. [Eng.] Brande & C. -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine variety of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France, where it was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed of a tree of the Philippines (Strychnos Ignatia), of properties similar to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo'94l.), a pecten (Vola Jacob'91us) worn by piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust. under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio Jacob'91a). -- Saint John's bread. (Bot.) See Carob. -- Saint John's-wort (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger, the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September at Doncaster, England; -- instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. -- Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant (Sauvagesia erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine. 1269 -- Saint Martin's summer, a season of mild, damp weather frequently prevailing during late autumn in England and the Mediterranean countries; -- so called from St. Martin's Festival, occuring on November 11. It corresponds to the Indian summer in America. Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under Cross. -- Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the death (about 466) of St. Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of Ireland. -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo'94l.) See John Dory, under John. -- Saint Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum Ascyron, H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath (Bot.), a shrubby kind of Spir'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long slender branches covered with clusters of small white blossoms in spring. -- Saint's bell. See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint Vitus's dance (Med.), chorea; -- so called from the supposed cures wrought on intercession to this saint.> Sale , n. See 1st Sallow. [Obs.] Spenser.

Sale

Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust. 4, under Cross. (b) (Bot.) A low North American shrub (Ascyrum Crux-Andr'91, the petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's cross. Gray. -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust. 6, under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly so called because it was supposed to have been cured by the intercession of Saint Anthony. -- Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the groundnut (Bunium flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it, and St. Anthony was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's turnip (Bot.), the bulbous crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Barnaby's thistle (Bot.), a kind of knapeweed (Centaurea solstitialis) flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Bernard (Zo'94l.), a breed of large, handsome dogs celebrated for strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at the Hospice of St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe and America. There are two races, the smooth-haired and the rough-haired. See Illust. under Dog. -- Saint Catharine's flower (Bot.), the plant love-a-mist. See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's heath (Bot.), a heatherlike plant (Dab'91cia polifolia), named from an Irish saint. -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint Elmo's fire, a luminious, flamelike appearance, sometimes seen in dark, tempestuous nights, at some prominent point on a ship, particularly at the masthead and the yardams. It has also been observed on land, and is due to the discharge of electricity from elevated or pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a Corposant; a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or a double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a field argent, the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign, a red cross on a white field with a union jack in the upper corner next the mast. It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint George's flag, a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the union jack; used as the sign of the presence and command of an admiral. [Eng.] Brande & C. -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine variety of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France, where it was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed of a tree of the Philippines (Strychnos Ignatia), of properties similar to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo'94l.), a pecten (Vola Jacob'91us) worn by piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust. under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio Jacob'91a). -- Saint John's bread. (Bot.) See Carob. -- Saint John's-wort (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger, the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September at Doncaster, England; -- instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. -- Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant (Sauvagesia erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine. 1269 -- Saint Martin's summer, a season of mild, damp weather frequently prevailing during late autumn in England and the Mediterranean countries; -- so called from St. Martin's Festival, occuring on November 11. It corresponds to the Indian summer in America. Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under Cross. -- Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the death (about 466) of St. Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of Ireland. -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo'94l.) See John Dory, under John. -- Saint Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum Ascyron, H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath (Bot.), a shrubby kind of Spir'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long slender branches covered with clusters of small white blossoms in spring. -- Saint's bell. See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint Vitus's dance (Med.), chorea; -- so called from the supposed cures wrought on intercession to this saint.> Sale, n. [Icel. sala, sal, akin to E.sell. See Sell, v. t.] 1. The act of selling; the transfer of property, or a contract to transfer the ownership of property, from one person to another for a valuable consideration, or for a price in money. 2. Opportunity of selling; demand; market.
They shall have ready sale for them.
3. Public disposal to the highest bidder, or exposure of goods in market; auction. Sir W. Temple. Bill of sale. See under Bill. -- Of sale, On sale, For sale, to be bought or sold; offered to purchasers; in the market. -- To set to sale, to offer for sale; to put up for purchase; to make merchandise of. [Obs.] Milton.

Saleable, a., Saleably

Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust. 4, under Cross. (b) (Bot.) A low North American shrub (Ascyrum Crux-Andr'91, the petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's cross. Gray. -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust. 6, under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly so called because it was supposed to have been cured by the intercession of Saint Anthony. -- Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the groundnut (Bunium flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it, and St. Anthony was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's turnip (Bot.), the bulbous crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Barnaby's thistle (Bot.), a kind of knapeweed (Centaurea solstitialis) flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Bernard (Zo'94l.), a breed of large, handsome dogs celebrated for strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at the Hospice of St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe and America. There are two races, the smooth-haired and the rough-haired. See Illust. under Dog. -- Saint Catharine's flower (Bot.), the plant love-a-mist. See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's heath (Bot.), a heatherlike plant (Dab'91cia polifolia), named from an Irish saint. -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint Elmo's fire, a luminious, flamelike appearance, sometimes seen in dark, tempestuous nights, at some prominent point on a ship, particularly at the masthead and the yardams. It has also been observed on land, and is due to the discharge of electricity from elevated or pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a Corposant; a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or a double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a field argent, the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign, a red cross on a white field with a union jack in the upper corner next the mast. It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint George's flag, a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the union jack; used as the sign of the presence and command of an admiral. [Eng.] Brande & C. -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine variety of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France, where it was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed of a tree of the Philippines (Strychnos Ignatia), of properties similar to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo'94l.), a pecten (Vola Jacob'91us) worn by piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust. under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio Jacob'91a). -- Saint John's bread. (Bot.) See Carob. -- Saint John's-wort (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger, the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September at Doncaster, England; -- instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. -- Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant (Sauvagesia erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine. 1269 -- Saint Martin's summer, a season of mild, damp weather frequently prevailing during late autumn in England and the Mediterranean countries; -- so called from St. Martin's Festival, occuring on November 11. It corresponds to the Indian summer in America. Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under Cross. -- Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the death (about 466) of St. Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of Ireland. -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo'94l.) See John Dory, under John. -- Saint Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum Ascyron, H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath (Bot.), a shrubby kind of Spir'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long slender branches covered with clusters of small white blossoms in spring. -- Saint's bell. See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint Vitus's dance (Med.), chorea; -- so called from the supposed cures wrought on intercession to this saint.> Sale"a*ble , a., Sale"a*bly, adv., etc.
See Salable, Salably, etc.

See 1st Sallow.

The act of selling; the transfer of property, or a contract to transfer the ownership of property, from one person to another for a valuable consideration, or for a price in money.

...

Usage Examples

Have you heard about the Irishman who reversed into a car boot sale and sold the engine?

My strengths as a businessman lie in the design and sale of women's shoes, and I have never been comfortable with complicated or technical legal or business documents.

The Nordic countries are leading the way on women's equality, recognizing women as equal citizens rather than commodities for sale.

Misspelled Form

sale, asale, wsale, esale, dsale, xsale, zsale, aale, wale, eale, dale, xale, zale, saale, swale, seale, sdale, sxale, szale, sqale, swale, ssale, szale, sqle, swle, ssle, szle, saqle, sawle, sasle, sazle, sakle, saole, saple, sa:le, sake, saoe, sape, sa:e, salke, saloe, salpe, sal:e, salwe, sal3e, sal4e, salre, salse, salde, salw, sal3, sal4, salr, sals, sald, salew, sale3, sale4, saler, sales, saled.

Other Usage Examples

When one may pay out over two million dollars to presidential and Congressional campaigns, the U.S. government is virtually up for sale.

Well, again, a gun sale database is just trying to get the Department of Justice to keep track of the guns that they're purchasing and supplying to drug dealers and murderers. I mean, wow. Come on, let's get the government under control before we start restricting the rights of - innocent citizens.

Oh there are lots of doctors and medical professionals out there who buy my devices at whole sale price.

Anything that won't sell, I don't want to invent. Its sale is proof of utility, and utility is success.

Comments


Browse Dictionary