saddle

[Sad┬Ědle]

A saddle is a leather seat for horseback riders. If you saddle something, you either put a saddle on it or you burden it with something else. If you buy an expensive saddle for example. you may be saddled (or burdened) with debt.

...

A seat for a rider, -- usually made of leather, padded to span comfortably a horse's back, furnished with stirrups for the rider's feet to rest in, and fastened in place with a girth; also, a seat for the rider on a bicycle or tricycle.

Noun
posterior part of the back of a domestic fowl

Noun
a seat for the rider of a bicycle

Noun
a seat for the rider of a horse

Noun
a piece of leather across the instep of a shoe

Noun
cut of meat (especially mutton or lamb) consisting of part of the backbone and both loins

...

Noun
a pass or ridge that slopes gently between two peaks (is shaped like a saddle)

Verb
impose a task upon, assign a responsibility to; "He charged her with cleaning up all the files over the weekend"

Verb
load or burden; encumber; "he saddled me with that heavy responsibility"

Verb
put a saddle on; "saddle the horses"


n.
A seat for a rider, -- usually made of leather, padded to span comfortably a horse's back, furnished with stirrups for the rider's feet to rest in, and fastened in place with a girth; also, a seat for the rider on a bicycle or tricycle.

n.
A padded part of a harness which is worn on a horse's back, being fastened in place with a girth. It serves various purposes, as to keep the breeching in place, carry guides for the reins, etc.

n.
A piece of meat containing a part of the backbone of an animal with the ribs on each side; as, a saddle of mutton, of venison, etc.

n.
A block of wood, usually fastened to some spar, and shaped to receive the end of another spar.

n.
A part, as a flange, which is hollowed out to fit upon a convex surface and serve as a means of attachment or support.

n.
The clitellus of an earthworm.

n.
The threshold of a door, when a separate piece from the floor or landing; -- so called because it spans and covers the joint between two floors.

v. t.
To put a saddle upon; to equip (a beast) for riding.

v. t.
Hence: To fix as a charge or burden upon; to load; to encumber; as, to saddle a town with the expense of bridges and highways.


Saddle

Sad"dle , n. [OE. sadel, AS. sadol; akin to D. zadel, G. sattel, OHG. satal, satul, Icel. s'94&edh;ull, Dan. & Sw. sadel; cf. Russ. siedlo; all perh. ultimately from the root of E. sit.] 1. A seat for a rider, -- usually made of leather, padded to span comfortably a horse's back, furnished with stirrups for the rider's feet to rest in, and fastened in place with a girth; also, a seat for the rider on a bicycle or tricycle. 2. A padded part of a harness which is worn on a horse's back, being fastened in place with a girth. It serves various purposes, as to keep the breeching in place, carry guides for the reins, etc. 3. A piece of meat containing a part of the backbone of an animal with the ribs on each side; as, a saddle of mutton, of venison, etc. 4. (Naut.) A block of wood, usually fastened to some spar, and shaped to receive the end of another spar. 5. (Mach.) A part, as a flange, which is hollowed out to fit upon a convex surface and serve as a means of attachment or support. 6. (Zo'94l.) The clitellus of an earthworm. 7. (Arch.) The threshold of a door, when a separate piece from the floor or landing; -- so called because it spans and covers the joint between two floors. Saddle bar (Arch.), one the small iron bars to which the lead panels of a glazed window are secured. Oxf. Gloss. -- Saddle gall (Far.), a sore or gall upon a horse's back, made by the saddle. -- Saddle girth, a band passing round the body of a horse to hold the saddle in its place. -- saddle horse, a horse suitable or trained for riding with a saddle. -- Saddle joint, in sheet-metal roofing, a joint formed by bending up the edge of a sheet and folding it downward over the turned-up edge of the next sheet. -- Saddle roof (Arch.), a roof having two gables and one ridge; -- said of such a roof when used in places where a different form is more common; as, a tower surmounted by a saddle roof. Called also saddleback roof. -- Saddle shell (Zo'94l.), any thin plicated bivalve shaell of the genera Placuna and Anomia; -- so called from its shape. Called also saddle oyster.

Saddle

Sad"dle , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saddled ; p. pr. & vb. n. Saddling .] [AS. sadelian.] 1. To put a saddle upon; to equip (a beast) for riding. "saddle my horse." Shak.
Abraham rose up early and saddled his ass.
2. Hence: To fix as a charge or burden upon; to load; to encumber; as, to saddle a town with the expense of bridges and highways.

A seat for a rider, -- usually made of leather, padded to span comfortably a horse's back, furnished with stirrups for the rider's feet to rest in, and fastened in place with a girth; also, a seat for the rider on a bicycle or tricycle.

To put a saddle upon; to equip (a beast) for riding.

...

Usage Examples

Saddle your dreams before you ride em.

I hope to die in the saddle seat.

Misspelled Form

saddle, asaddle, wsaddle, esaddle, dsaddle, xsaddle, zsaddle, aaddle, waddle, eaddle, daddle, xaddle, zaddle, saaddle, swaddle, seaddle, sdaddle, sxaddle, szaddle, sqaddle, swaddle, ssaddle, szaddle, sqddle, swddle, ssddle, szddle, saqddle, sawddle, sasddle, sazddle, sasddle, saeddle, safddle, saxddle, sacddle, sasdle, saedle, safdle, saxdle, sacdle, sadsdle, sadedle, sadfdle, sadxdle, sadcdle, sadsdle, sadedle, sadfdle, sadxdle, sadcdle, sadsle, sadele, sadfle, sadxle, sadcle, saddsle, saddele, saddfle, saddxle, saddcle, saddkle, saddole, saddple, sadd:le, saddke, saddoe, saddpe, sadd:e, saddlke, saddloe, saddlpe, saddl:e, saddlwe, saddl3e, saddl4e, saddlre, saddlse, saddlde, saddlw, saddl3, saddl4, saddlr, saddls, saddld, saddlew, saddle3, saddle4, saddler, saddles, saddled.

Other Usage Examples

If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle.

I love Westerns and I remember as a kid climbing up on the couch and make it into a saddle and shoot guns and fall off. I would lay there after my death and my mom would tell me to eat lunch and I'd say, 'I'm still dead, Mom!' I was Method, even then.

Comments


Browse Dictionary