relative

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[rel·a·tive]

A relative is a person who is part of your family. Parents, siblings, uncles, aunts, grandparents, cousins, nieces and nephews they're all relatives.

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Having relation or reference; referring; respecting; standing in connection; pertaining; as, arguments not relative to the subject.

Noun
an animal or plant that bears a relationship to another (as related by common descent or by membership in the same genus)

Noun
a person related by blood or marriage; "police are searching for relatives of the deceased"; "he has distant relations back in New Jersey"

Adjective
not absolute or complete; "a relative stranger"

Adjective S.
properly related in size or degree or other measurable characteristics; usually followed by `to''; "punishment oughtt to be proportional to the crime"; "earnings relative to production"


a.
Having relation or reference; referring; respecting; standing in connection; pertaining; as, arguments not relative to the subject.

a.
Arising from relation; resulting from connection with, or reference to, something else; not absolute.

a.
Indicating or expressing relation; refering to an antecedent; as, a relative pronoun.

a.
Characterizing or pertaining to chords and keys, which, by reason of the identify of some of their tones, admit of a natural transition from one to the other.

n.
One who, or that which, relates to, or is considered in its relation to, something else; a relative object or term; one of two object or term; one of two objects directly connected by any relation.

n.
A person connected by blood or affinity; strictly, one allied by blood; a relation; a kinsman or kinswoman.

n.
A relative pronoun; a word which relates to, or represents, another word or phrase, called its antecedent; as, the relatives "who", "which", "that".


Relative

Rel"a*tive (r?l"?-t?v), a. [F. relatif, L. relativus. See Relate.] 1. Having relation or reference; referring; respecting; standing in connection; pertaining; as, arguments not relative to the subject.
I'll have grounds More relative than this.
2. Arising from relation; resulting from connection with, or reference to, something else; not absolute.
Every thing sustains both an absolute and a relative capacity: an absolute, as it is such a thing, endued with such a nature; and a relative, as it is a part of the universe, and so stands in such a relations to the whole.
3. (Gram.) Indicating or expressing relation; refering to an antecedent; as, a relative pronoun. 4. (Mus.) Characterizing or pertaining to chords and keys, which, by reason of the identify of some of their tones, admit of a natural transition from one to the other. Moore (Encyc. of Music). Relative clause (Gram.), a clause introduced by a relative pronoun. -- Relative term, a term which implies relation to, as guardian to ward, matter to servant, husband to wife. Cf. Correlative.

Relative

Rel"a*tive, n. One who, or that which, relates to, or is considered in its relation to, something else; a relative object or term; one of two object or term; one of two objects directly connected by any relation. Specifically: (a) A person connected by blood or affinity; strictly, one allied by blood; a relation; a kinsman or kinswoman. "Confining our care . . . to ourselves and relatives." Bp. Fell. (b) (Gram.) A relative prnoun; a word which relates to, or represents, another word or phrase, called its antecedent; as, the relatives " who", "which", "that".

Having relation or reference; referring; respecting; standing in connection; pertaining; as, arguments not relative to the subject.

One who, or that which, relates to, or is considered in its relation to, something else; a relative object or term; one of two object or term; one of two objects directly connected by any relation.

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Usage Examples

Britain, relative to the U.S., is a highly secular society. Philanthropy alone cannot fill the gap left by government cutbacks. And the sources of altruism go deep into our evolutionary past.

I met my grandfather just before he died, and it was the first time that I had seen Dad with a relative of his. It was interesting to see my own father as a son and the body language and alteration in attitude that comes with that, and it sort of changed our relationship for the better.

Beauty is composed of an eternal, invariable element whose quantity is extremely difficult to determine, and a relative element which might be, either by turns or all at once, period, fashion, moral, passion.

Beauty is as relative as light and dark. Thus, there exists no beautiful woman, none at all, because you are never certain that a still far more beautiful woman will not appear and completely shame the supposed beauty of the first.

Beauty, like truth, is relative to the time when one lives and to the individual who can grasp it. The expression of beauty is in direct ratio to the power of conception the artist has acquired.

If a man's character is to be abused there's nobody like a relative to do the business.

Bill Gates is a relative newcomer to the fight against global warming, but he's already shifting the debate over climate change.

A life lesson for me is, how do you muster the courage to take on a new risk? Whether it's starting up a business or taking on a new project or expedition. I think the risks that we take are all relative to the risk-taker.

Misspelled Form

relative, erelative, 4relative, 5relative, trelative, frelative, eelative, 4elative, 5elative, telative, felative, reelative, r4elative, r5elative, rtelative, rfelative, rwelative, r3elative, r4elative, rrelative, rselative, rdelative, rwlative, r3lative, r4lative, rrlative, rslative, rdlative, rewlative, re3lative, re4lative, rerlative, reslative, redlative, reklative, reolative, replative, re:lative, rekative, reoative, repative, re:ative, relkative, reloative, relpative, rel:ative, relqative, relwative, relsative, relzative, relqtive, relwtive, relstive, relztive, relaqtive, relawtive, relastive, relaztive, relartive, rela5tive, rela6tive, relaytive, relagtive, relarive, rela5ive, rela6ive, relayive, relagive, relatrive, relat5ive, relat6ive, relatyive, relatgive, relatuive, relat8ive, relat9ive, relatoive, relatjive, relatkive, relatuve, relat8ve, relat9ve, relatove, relatjve, relatkve, relatiuve, relati8ve, relati9ve, relatiove, relatijve, relatikve, relaticve, relatifve, relatigve, relatibve, relati ve, relatice, relatife, relatige, relatibe, relati e, relativce, relativfe, relativge, relativbe, relativ e, relativwe, relativ3e, relativ4e, relativre, relativse, relativde, relativw, relativ3, relativ4, relativr, relativs, relativd, relativew, relative3, relative4, relativer, relatives, relatived.

Other Usage Examples

Every experience is a paradox in that it means to be absolute, and yet is relative in that it somehow always goes beyond itself and yet never escapes itself.

I had one relative who passed away but fortunately none others. So my sort of experience of it is quite limited, thankfully.

In a sense it might even be said that our failure is to form habits: for, after all, habit is relative to a stereotyped world, and meantime it is only the roughness of the eye that makes two persons, things, situations, seem alike.

I've been quite fascinated by the relative insignificance of human existence, the shortness of life. We might as well be a letter in a word in a sentence on a page in a book in a library in a city in one country in this enormous universe! And that kind of fear and insignificance has kept me awake at night.

But I am just as appalled that my experience, knowledge, dedication and service relative to defending the United States against biological warfare has been turned against me in connection with the search for the anthrax killer.

It is an interesting question how far men would retain their relative rank if they were divested of their clothes.

I do want to try to put things in perspective today relative to the U.S.-Canada relationship. I would like to start by talking about how important this relationship is to the people of the United States.

Excellence, then, is a state concerned with choice, lying in a mean, relative to us, this being determined by reason and in the way in which the man of practical wisdom would determine it.

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