raft

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[Raft]

A raft is a vessel or structure that's made to float on water. You might have an inflatable raft you use for floating around your backyard pool.

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imp. & p. p. of Reave.

Noun
a flat float (usually made of logs or planks) that can be used for transport or as a platform for swimmers

Noun
(often followed by `of'') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "it must have cost plenty"

Verb
make into a raft; "raft these logs"

Verb
travel by raft in water; "Raft the Colorado River"

Verb
transport on a raft; "raft wood down a river"

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imp. & p. p. of Reave.

n.
A collection of logs, boards, pieces of timber, or the like, fastened together, either for their own collective conveyance on the water, or to serve as a support in conveying other things; a float.

n.
A collection of logs, fallen trees, etc. (such as is formed in some Western rivers of the United States), which obstructs navigation.

n.
A large collection of people or things taken indiscriminately.

v. t.
To transport on a raft, or in the form of a raft; to make into a raft; as, to raft timber.


of Reave


Raft

Raft , obs. imp. & p. p. of Reave. Spenser.

Raft

Raft, n. [Originally, a rafter, spar, and fr. Icel. raptr a rafter; akin to Dan. raft, Prov. G. raff a rafter, spar; cf. OHG. r'befo, r'bevo, a beam, rafter, Icel. r'bef roof. Cf. Rafter, n.] 1. A collection of logs, boards, pieces of timber, or the like, fastened, together, either for their own collective conveyance on the water, or to serve as a support in conveying other things; a float. 2. A collection of logs, fallen trees, etc. (such as is formed in some Western rivers of the United States), which obstructs navigation. [U.S.] 3. [Perhaps akin to raff a heap.] A large collection of people or things taken indiscriminately. [Slang, U. S.] "A whole raft of folks." W. D. Howells. Raft bridge. (a) A bridge whose points of support are rafts. (b) A bridge that consists of floating timbers fastened together. -- Raft duck. [The name alludes to its swimming in dense flocks.] (Zo'94l.) (a) The bluebill, or greater scaup duck; -- called also flock duck. See Scaup. (b) The redhead. -- Raft port (Naut.), a large, square port in a vessel's side for loading or unloading timber or other bulky articles; a timber or lumber port.

Raft

Raft, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Rafted; p. pr. & vb. n. Rafting.] To transport on a raft, or in the form of a raft; to make into a raft; as, to raft timber.

imp. & p. p. of Reave.

A collection of logs, boards, pieces of timber, or the like, fastened, together, either for their own collective conveyance on the water, or to serve as a support in conveying other things; a float.

To transport on a raft, or in the form of a raft; to make into a raft; as, to raft timber.

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Usage Examples

Today I can announce a raft of reforms that we estimate could save over 2.5 million police hours every year. That's the equivalent of more than 1,200 police officer posts. These reforms are a watershed moment in policing. They show that we really mean business in busting bureaucracy.

Misspelled Form

raft, eraft, 4raft, 5raft, traft, fraft, eaft, 4aft, 5aft, taft, faft, reaft, r4aft, r5aft, rtaft, rfaft, rqaft, rwaft, rsaft, rzaft, rqft, rwft, rsft, rzft, raqft, rawft, rasft, razft, radft, rarft, ratft, ragft, ravft, racft, radt, rart, ratt, ragt, ravt, ract, rafdt, rafrt, raftt, rafgt, rafvt, rafct, rafrt, raf5t, raf6t, rafyt, rafgt, rafr, raf5, raf6, rafy, rafg, raftr, raft5, raft6, rafty, raftg.

Other Usage Examples

It's hard now to imagine that kind of travel and the daily tasks they simply took for granted. If a wagon axle broke, you had to stop and carve a new one. To cross a river, you sometimes had to build a raft.

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