public

...
[pub┬Ělic]

Something that affects the entire community whether it's your town, your country, or the world is public. Climate change, for example, is a public concern, as is finding a clean public bathroom.

...

Of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; -- opposed to private; as, the public treasury.

Noun
a body of people sharing some common interest; "the reading public"

Noun
people in general considered as a whole; "he is a hero in the eyes of the public"

Adjective S.
affecting the people or community as a whole; "community leaders"; "community interests"; "the public welfare"

Adjective
not private; open to or concerning the people as a whole; "the public good"; "public libraries"; "public funds"; "public parks"; "a public scandal"; "public gardens"; "performers and members of royal families are public figures"


a.
Of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; -- opposed to private; as, the public treasury.

a.
Open to the knowledge or view of all; general; common; notorious; as, public report; public scandal.

a.
Open to common or general use; as, a public road; a public house.

n.
The general body of mankind, or of a nation, state, or community; the people, indefinitely; as, the American public; also, a particular body or aggregation of people; as, an author's public.

n.
A public house; an inn.


Public

Pub"lic , a. [L. publicus, poblicus, fr. populus people: cf. F. public. See People.] 1. Of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; -- opposed to private; as, the public treasury.
To the public good Private respects must yield.
He [Alexander Hamilton] touched the dead corpse of the public credit, and it sprung upon its feet.
2. Open to the knowledge or view of all; general; common; notorious; as, public report; public scandal.
Joseph, . . . not willing to make her a public example, was minded to put her away privily.
3. Open to common or general use; as, a public road; a public house. "The public street." Shak. Public act ∨ statute (Law), an act or statute affecting matters of public concern. Of such statutes the courts take judicial notice. -- Public credit. See under Credit. -- Public funds. See Fund, 3. -- Public house, an inn, or house of entertainment. -- Public law. (a) See International law, under International. (b) A public act or statute. -- Public nuisance. (Law) See under Nuisance. -- Public orator. (Eng. Universities) See Orator, 3. -- Public stores, military and naval stores, equipments, etc. -- Public works, all fixed works built by civil engineers for public use, as railways, docks, canals, etc.; but strictly, military and civil engineering works constructed at the public cost.

Public

Pub"lic, n. 1. The general body of mankind, or of a nation, state, or community; the people, indefinitely; as, the American public; also, a particular body or aggregation of people; as, an author's public.
The public is more disposed to censure than to praise.
2. A public house; an inn. [Scot.] Sir W. Scott. In public, openly; before an audience or the people at large; not in private or secrecy. "We are to speak in public." Shak.

Of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; -- opposed to private; as, the public treasury.

The general body of mankind, or of a nation, state, or community; the people, indefinitely; as, the American public; also, a particular body or aggregation of people; as, an author's public.

...

Usage Examples

A merchant who approaches business with the idea of serving the public well has nothing to fear from the competition.

A nation which has forgotten the quality of courage which in the past has been brought to public life is not as likely to insist upon or regard that quality in its chosen leaders today - and in fact we have forgotten.

After the Great Depression and after public urging, a nationwide public competition was held to determine a design for a memorial that would honor President Thomas Jefferson's bold vision for westward expansion for America.

All provisions of federal, state or local law requiring or permitting discrimination in public education must yield.

A am a great friend of public amusements, they keep people from vice.

Advances in science and medical research and public health policies have meant that life expectancy for Australians is one of the highest in the world.

A lot of people, because of my contempt for the false consolations of religion, think of me as a symbolic public opponent of that in extremis. And sometimes that makes me feel a bit alarmed, to be the repository of other people's hope.

Misspelled Form

public, opublic, 0public, lpublic, oublic, 0ublic, lublic, poublic, p0ublic, plublic, pyublic, p7ublic, p8ublic, piublic, pjublic, pyblic, p7blic, p8blic, piblic, pjblic, puyblic, pu7blic, pu8blic, puiblic, pujblic, puvblic, pugblic, puhblic, punblic, pu blic, puvlic, puglic, puhlic, punlic, pu lic, pubvlic, pubglic, pubhlic, pubnlic, pub lic, pubklic, pubolic, pubplic, pub:lic, pubkic, puboic, pubpic, pub:ic, publkic, publoic, publpic, publ:ic, publuic, publ8ic, publ9ic, publoic, publjic, publkic, publuc, publ8c, publ9c, publoc, publjc, publkc, publiuc, publi8c, publi9c, publioc, publijc, publikc, publixc, publidc, publifc, publivc, publi c, publix, publid, publif, publiv, publi , publicx, publicd, publicf, publicv, public .

Other Usage Examples

A serious problem in America is the gap between academe and the mass media, which is our culture. Professors of humanities, with all their leftist fantasies, have little direct knowledge of American life and no impact whatever on public policy.

A significant number of pages and sentences that the administration wants to keep in a classified status have already been released publicly, some of it by public statements of the leadership of the CIA and the FBI.

A politician never forgets the precarious nature of elective life. We have never established a practice of tenure in public office.

A public expectation, it has to be said, not of poetry as such but of political positions variously approvable by mutually disapproving groups.

A politician's goal is always to manipulate public debate. I think there are some politicians with higher goals. But all of them get corrupted by power.

Alabama citizens, like the vast majority of Americans, respect and value the meaning of decency, and appreciate public institutions that reflect the common values of our society.

Air travel is the safest form of travel aside from walking even then, the chances of being hit by a public bus at 30,000 feet are remarkably slim. I also have no problem with confined spaces. Or heights. What I am afraid of is speed.

Ageism works in both directions. As a teenager in the public eye, people would talk condescendingly to me. When you get older there's this feeling that you have to start carving up your face and body. Right now I'm in the middle ground - I think women in their thirties are taken seriously.

Comments


Browse Dictionary