practice

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[prac┬Ětice]

Practice can be a noun or a verb, but either way it's about how things are done on a regular basis. You can practice shotput every day because your town has a practice of supporting track and field events.

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Frequently repeated or customary action; habitual performance; a succession of acts of a similar kind; usage; habit; custom; as, the practice of rising early; the practice of making regular entries of accounts; the practice of daily exercise.

Noun
a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"

Noun
translating an idea into action; "a hard theory to put into practice"; "differences between theory and praxis of communism"

Noun
the exercise of a profession; "the practice of the law"; "I took over his practice when he retired"

Noun
systematic training by multiple repetitions; "practice makes perfect"

Noun
knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"

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Verb
learn by repetition; "We drilled French verbs every day"; "Pianists practice scales"

Verb
engage in a rehearsal (of)

Verb
avail oneself to; "apply a principle"; "practice a religion"; "use care when going down the stairs"; "use your common sense"; "practice non-violent resistance"

Verb
carry out or practice; as of jobs and professions; "practice law"


n.
Frequently repeated or customary action; habitual performance; a succession of acts of a similar kind; usage; habit; custom; as, the practice of rising early; the practice of making regular entries of accounts; the practice of daily exercise.

n.
Customary or constant use; state of being used.

n.
Skill or dexterity acquired by use; expertness.

n.
Actual performance; application of knowledge; -- opposed to theory.

n.
Systematic exercise for instruction or discipline; as, the troops are called out for practice; she neglected practice in music.

n.
Application of science to the wants of men; the exercise of any profession; professional business; as, the practice of medicine or law; a large or lucrative practice.

n.
Skillful or artful management; dexterity in contrivance or the use of means; art; stratagem; artifice; plot; -- usually in a bad sense.

n.
A easy and concise method of applying the rules of arithmetic to questions which occur in trade and business.

n.
The form, manner, and order of conducting and carrying on suits and prosecutions through their various stages, according to the principles of law and the rules laid down by the courts.

v. t.
To do or perform frequently, customarily, or habitually; to make a practice of; as, to practice gaming.

v. t.
To exercise, or follow, as a profession, trade, art, etc., as, to practice law or medicine.

v. t.
To exercise one's self in, for instruction or improvement, or to acquire discipline or dexterity; as, to practice gunnery; to practice music.

v. t.
To put into practice; to carry out; to act upon; to commit; to execute; to do.

v. t.
To make use of; to employ.

v. t.
To teach or accustom by practice; to train.

v. i.
To perform certain acts frequently or customarily, either for instruction, profit, or amusement; as, to practice with the broadsword or with the rifle; to practice on the piano.

v. i.
To learn by practice; to form a habit.

v. i.
To try artifices or stratagems.

v. i.
To apply theoretical science or knowledge, esp. by way of experiment; to exercise or pursue an employment or profession, esp. that of medicine or of law.


Practice

Prac"tice , n. [OE. praktike, practique, F. pratique, formerly also, practique, LL. practica, fr. Gr. , fr. practical. See Practical, and cf. Pratique, Pretty.] 1. Frequently repeated or customary action; habitual performance; a succession of acts of a similar kind; usage; habit; custom; as, the practice of rising early; the practice of making regular entries of accounts; the practice of daily exercise.
A heart . . . exercised with covetous practices.
2. Customary or constant use; state of being used.
Obsolete words may be revived when they are more sounding or more significant than those in practice.
3. Skill or dexterity acquired by use; expertness. [R.] "His nice fence and his active practice." Shak. 4. Actual performance; application of knowledge; -- opposed to theory.
There are two functions of the soul, -- contemplation and practice.
There is a distinction, but no opposition, between theory and practice; each, to a certain extent, supposes the other; theory is dependent on practice; practice must have preceded theory.
5. Systematic exercise for instruction or discipline; as, the troops are called out for practice; she neglected practice in music. 6. Application of science to the wants of men; the exercise of any profession; professional business; as, the practice of medicine or law; a large or lucrative practice.
Practice is exercise of an art, or the application of a science in life, which application is itself an art.
7. Skillful or artful management; dexterity in contrivance or the use of means; art; stratagem; artifice; plot; -- usually in a bad sense. [Obs.] Bacon.
He sought to have that by practice which he could not by prayer.
8. (Math.) A easy and concise method of applying the rules of arithmetic to questions which occur in trade and business. 9. (Law) The form, manner, and order of conducting and carrying on suits and prosecutions through their various stages, according to the principles of law and the rules laid down by the courts. Bouvier. Syn. -- Custom; usage; habit; manner.

Practice

Prac"tice , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Practiced ; p. pr. & vb. n. Practicing .] [Often written practise, practised, practising.] 1. To do or perform frequently, customarily, or habitually; to make a practice of; as, to practice gaming. "Incline not my heart . . . practice wicked works." Ps. cxli. 4. 2. To exercise, or follow, as a profession, trade, art, etc., as, to practice law or medicine. 2. To exercise one's self in, for instruction or improvement, or to acquire discipline or dexterity; as, to practice gunnery; to practice music. 4. To put into practice; to carry out; to act upon; to commit; to execute; to do. "Aught but Talbot's shadow whereon to practice your severity." Shak.
As this advice ye practice or neglect.
5. To make use of; to employ. [Obs.]
In malice to this good knight's wife, I practiced Ubaldo and Ricardo to corrupt her.
6. To teach or accustom by practice; to train.
In church they are taught to love God; after church they are practiced to love their neighbor.

Practice

Prac"tice, v. i. [Often written practise.] 1. To perform certain acts frequently or customarily, either for instruction, profit, or amusement; as, to practice with the broadsword or with the rifle; to practice on the piano. 2. To learn by practice; to form a habit.
They shall practice how to live secure.
Practice first over yourself to reign.
3. To try artifices or stratagems.
He will practice against thee by poison.
4. To apply theoretical science or knowledge, esp. by way of experiment; to exercise or pursue an employment or profession, esp. that of medicine or of law.
[I am] little inclined to practice on others, and as little that others should practice on me.

Frequently repeated or customary action; habitual performance; a succession of acts of a similar kind; usage; habit; custom; as, the practice of rising early; the practice of making regular entries of accounts; the practice of daily exercise.

To do or perform frequently, customarily, or habitually; to make a practice of; as, to practice gaming.

To perform certain acts frequently or customarily, either for instruction, profit, or amusement; as, to practice with the broadsword or with the rifle; to practice on the piano.

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Usage Examples

Because most of my career in the classroom has been at art schools (beginning at Bennington in the 1970s), I am hyper-aware of the often grotesque disconnect between commentary on the arts and the actual practice or production of the arts.

Anonymous blog comments, vapid video pranks and lightweight mash-ups may seem trivial and harmless, but as a whole, this widespread practice of fragmentary, impersonal communication has demeaned personal interaction.

Courage is the most important of all the virtues, because without courage you can't practice any other virtue consistently. You can practice any virtue erratically, but nothing consistently without courage.

Beautiful Evidence is about the theory and practice of analytical design.

All are free to believe or not believe all are free to practice a faith or not. But those who believe must be free to speak of and act on their belief.

Doctors, dressed up in one professional costume or another, have been in busy practice since the earliest records of every culture on earth. It is hard to think of a more dependable or enduring occupation, harder still to imagine any future events leading to its extinction.

Corporations, consumers, and citizens must begin acting in concert to create a powerful third pillar of social transformation if we hope to meet the social challenges we currently face with equal force. This begins with corporations that choose to alter how they practice capitalism in two ways to serve the greater good.

Apathy can be overcome by enthusiasm, and enthusiasm can only be aroused by two things: first, an ideal, with takes the imagination by storm, and second, a definite intelligible plan for carrying that ideal into practice.

Compassion is a practically acquired knowledge, like dancing. You must do it and practice diligently day by day.

Misspelled Form

practice, opractice, 0practice, lpractice, oractice, 0ractice, lractice, poractice, p0ractice, plractice, peractice, p4ractice, p5ractice, ptractice, pfractice, peactice, p4actice, p5actice, ptactice, pfactice, preactice, pr4actice, pr5actice, prtactice, prfactice, prqactice, prwactice, prsactice, przactice, prqctice, prwctice, prsctice, przctice, praqctice, prawctice, prasctice, prazctice, praxctice, pradctice, prafctice, pravctice, pra ctice, praxtice, pradtice, praftice, pravtice, pra tice, pracxtice, pracdtice, pracftice, pracvtice, prac tice, pracrtice, prac5tice, prac6tice, pracytice, pracgtice, pracrice, prac5ice, prac6ice, pracyice, pracgice, practrice, pract5ice, pract6ice, practyice, practgice, practuice, pract8ice, pract9ice, practoice, practjice, practkice, practuce, pract8ce, pract9ce, practoce, practjce, practkce, practiuce, practi8ce, practi9ce, practioce, practijce, practikce, practixce, practidce, practifce, practivce, practi ce, practixe, practide, practife, practive, practi e, practicxe, practicde, practicfe, practicve, practic e, practicwe, practic3e, practic4e, practicre, practicse, practicde, practicw, practic3, practic4, practicr, practics, practicd, practicew, practice3, practice4, practicer, practices, practiced.

Other Usage Examples

Even scientific knowledge, if there is anything to it, is not a random observation of random objects for the critical objectivity of significant knowledge is attained as a practice only philosophically in inner action.

Agricultural practice served Darwin as the material basis for the elaboration of his theory of Evolution, which explained the natural causation of the adaptation we see in the structure of the organic world. That was a great advance in the knowledge of living nature.

Close contact between science and the practice of collective farms and State farms creates inexhaustible opportunities for the development of theoretical knowledge, enabling us to learn ever more and more about the nature of living bodies and the soil.

All men commend patience, although few are willing to practice it.

As much as I hate his movies, Oliver Stone has an aspiration I admire, and that is that he wants his art to be part of what makes and changes public policy and cultural practice.

A politician never forgets the precarious nature of elective life. We have never established a practice of tenure in public office.

Clinton and Obama practice this politics known quaintly as the Richard Speck strategy: if you cannot take on everyone in the room at once, take them out of the room one at a time.

Billions of people don't practice a religion at all.

Ask yourself the secret of your success. Listen to your answer, and practice it.

Feminism encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism and become lesbians.

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