power

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[Pow·er]

Someone with power has physical strength or they're in control of things. So a weakling who's in charge of a business still has a lot of power.

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Same as Poor, the fish.

Noun
physical strength

Noun
possession of controlling influence; "the deterrent power of nuclear weapons"; "the power of his love saved her"; "his powerfulness was concealed by a gentle facade"

Noun
possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"

Noun
a mathematical notation indicating the number of times a quantity is multiplied by itself

Noun
a state powerful enough to influence events throughout the world

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Noun
a very wealthy or powerful businessman; "an oil baron"

Noun
one possessing or exercising power or influence or authority; "the mysterious presence of an evil power"; "may the force be with you"; "the forces of evil"

Noun
(physics) the rate of doing work; measured in watts (= joules/second)

Noun
(of a government or government official) holding an office means being in power; "being in office already gives a candidate a great advantage"; "during his first year in office"; "during his first year in power"; "the power of the president"

Verb
supply the force or power for the functioning of; "The gasoline powers the engines"


n.
Same as Poor, the fish.

n.
Ability to act, regarded as latent or inherent; the faculty of doing or performing something; capacity for action or performance; capability of producing an effect, whether physical or moral: potency; might; as, a man of great power; the power of capillary attraction; money gives power.

n.
Ability, regarded as put forth or exerted; strength, force, or energy in action; as, the power of steam in moving an engine; the power of truth, or of argument, in producing conviction; the power of enthusiasm.

n.
Capacity of undergoing or suffering; fitness to be acted upon; susceptibility; -- called also passive power; as, great power of endurance.

n.
The exercise of a faculty; the employment of strength; the exercise of any kind of control; influence; dominion; sway; command; government.

n.
The agent exercising an ability to act; an individual invested with authority; an institution, or government, which exercises control; as, the great powers of Europe; hence, often, a superhuman agent; a spirit; a divinity.

n.
A military or naval force; an army or navy; a great host.

n.
A large quantity; a great number; as, a power o/ good things.

n.
The rate at which mechanical energy is exerted or mechanical work performed, as by an engine or other machine, or an animal, working continuously; as, an engine of twenty horse power.

n.
A mechanical agent; that from which useful mechanical energy is derived; as, water power; steam power; hand power, etc.

n.
Applied force; force producing motion or pressure; as, the power applied at one and of a lever to lift a weight at the other end.

n.
A machine acted upon by an animal, and serving as a motor to drive other machinery; as, a dog power.

n.
The product arising from the multiplication of a number into itself; as, a square is the second power, and a cube is third power, of a number.

n.
Mental or moral ability to act; one of the faculties which are possessed by the mind or soul; as, the power of thinking, reasoning, judging, willing, fearing, hoping, etc.

n.
The degree to which a lens, mirror, or any optical instrument, magnifies; in the telescope, and usually in the microscope, the number of times it multiplies, or augments, the apparent diameter of an object; sometimes, in microscopes, the number of times it multiplies the apparent surface.

n.
An authority enabling a person to dispose of an interest vested either in himself or in another person; ownership by appointment.

n.
Hence, vested authority to act in a given case; as, the business was referred to a committee with power.


Power

Pow"er , n. (Zo'94l.) Same as Poor, the fish.

Power

Pow"er, n. [OE. pouer, poer, OF. poeir, pooir, F. pouvoir, n. & v., fr. LL. potere, for L. posse, potesse, to be able, to have power. See Possible, Potent, and cf. Posse comitatus.] 1. Ability to act, regarded as latent or inherent; the faculty of doing or performing something; capacity for action or performance; capability of producing an effect, whether physical or moral: potency; might; as, a man of great power; the power of capillary attraction; money gives power. "One next himself in power, and next in crime." Milton. 2. Ability, regarded as put forth or exerted; strength, force, or energy in action; as, the power of steam in moving an engine; the power of truth, or of argument, in producing conviction; the power of enthusiasm. "The power of fancy." Shak. 3. Capacity of undergoing or suffering; fitness to be acted upon; susceptibility; -- called also passive power; as, great power of endurance.
Power, then, is active and passive; faculty is active power or capacity; capacity is passive power.
4. The exercise of a faculty; the employment of strength; the exercise of any kind of control; influence; dominion; sway; command; government.
Power is no blessing in itself but when it is employed to protect the innocent.
5. The agent exercising an ability to act; an individual invested with authority; an institution, or government, which exercises control; as, the great powers of Europe; hence, often, a superhuman agent; a spirit; a divinity. "The powers of darkness." Milton.
And the powers of the heavens shall be shaken.
6. A military or naval force; an army or navy; a great host. Spenser.
Never such a power . . . Was levied in the body of a land.
7. A large quantity; a great number; as, a power o good things. [Colloq.] Richardson. 8. (Mech.) (a) The rate at which mechanical energy is exerted or mechanical work performed, as by an engine or other machine, or an animal, working continuously; as, an engine of twenty horse power. &hand; The English unit of power used most commonly is the horse power. See Horse power. (b) A mechanical agent; that from which useful mechanical energy is derived; as, water power; steam power; hand power, etc. (c) Applied force; force producing motion or pressure; as, the power applied at one and of a lever to lift a weight at the other end. &hand; This use in mechanics, of power as a synonym for force, is improper and is becoming obsolete. (d) A machine acted upon by an animal, and serving as a motor to drive other machinery; as, a dog power. &hand; Power is used adjectively, denoting, driven, or adapted to be driven, by machinery, and not actuated directly by the hand or foot; as, a power lathe; a power loom; a power press. 9. (Math.) The product arising from the multiplication of a number into itself; as, a square is the second power, and a cube is third power, of a number. 10. (Metaph.) Mental or moral ability to act; one of the faculties which are possessed by the mind or soul; as, the power of thinking, reasoning, judging, willing, fearing, hoping, etc. I. Watts.
The guiltiness of my mind, the sudden surprise of my powers, drove the grossness . . . into a received belief.
11. (Optics) The degree to which a lens, mirror, or any optical instrument, magnifies; in the telescope, and usually in the microscope, the number of times it multiplies, or augments, the apparent diameter of an object; sometimes, in microscopes, the number of times it multiplies the apparent surface. 12. (Law) An authority enabling a person to dispose of an interest vested either in himself or in another person; ownership by appointment. Wharton. 13. Hence, vested authority to act in a given case; as, the business was referred to a committee with power. &hand; Power may be predicated of inanimate agents, like the winds and waves, electricity and magnetism, gravitation, etc., or of animal and intelligent beings; and when predicated of these beings, it may indicate physical, mental, or moral ability or capacity. Mechanical powers. See under Mechanical. -- Power loom, ∨ Power press. See Def. 8 (d), note. -- Power of attorney. See under Attorney. -- Power of a point (relative to a given curve) (Geom.), the result of substituting the co'94rdinates of any point in that expression which being put equal to zero forms the equation of the curve; as, x2 + y2 - 100 is the power of the point x, y, relative to the circle x2 + y2 - 100 = 0.

Same as Poor, the fish.

Ability to act, regarded as latent or inherent; the faculty of doing or performing something; capacity for action or performance; capability of producing an effect, whether physical or moral: potency; might; as, a man of great power; the power of capillary attraction; money gives power.

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Usage Examples

A physician's physiology has much the same relation to his power of healing as a cleric's divinity has to his power of influencing conduct.

A fascist is one whose lust for money or power is combined with such an intensity of intolerance toward those of other races, parties, classes, religions, cultures, regions or nations as to make him ruthless in his use of deceit or violence to attain his ends.

A man's true state of power and riches is to be in himself.

A man who lives right, and is right, has more power in his silence than another has by his words.

'Smart power' is the use of American power in ways that would help prevent and resolve conflict - not just send our military in.

A politician's goal is always to manipulate public debate. I think there are some politicians with higher goals. But all of them get corrupted by power.

A bad book is the worse that it cannot repent. It has not been the devil's policy to keep the masses of mankind in ignorance but finding that they will read, he is doing all in his power to poison their books.

A leader has the vision and conviction that a dream can be achieved. He inspires the power and energy to get it done.

Misspelled Form

power, opower, 0power, lpower, oower, 0ower, lower, poower, p0ower, plower, piower, p9ower, p0ower, ppower, plower, piwer, p9wer, p0wer, ppwer, plwer, poiwer, po9wer, po0wer, popwer, polwer, poqwer, po2wer, po3wer, poewer, poawer, poswer, poqer, po2er, po3er, poeer, poaer, poser, powqer, pow2er, pow3er, poweer, powaer, powser, powwer, pow3er, pow4er, powrer, powser, powder, powwr, pow3r, pow4r, powrr, powsr, powdr, powewr, powe3r, powe4r, powerr, powesr, powedr, poweer, powe4r, powe5r, powetr, powefr, powee, powe4, powe5, powet, powef, powere, power4, power5, powert, powerf.

Other Usage Examples

'Charm' - which means the power to effect work without employing brute force - is indispensable to women. Charm is a woman's strength just as strength is a man's charm.

A reform is a correction of abuses a revolution is a transfer of power.

A great power has to have the discipline not only to go when necessary but to know when not to go. Getting involved in ethnic, religious civil wars is a recipe for disaster.

A picture must possess a real power to generate light and for a long time now I've been conscious of expressing myself through light or rather in light.

A major power can afford a military debacle only when it looks like a political victory.

A cult is a religion with no political power.

A Libertarian society of unfettered individualism spreads its benefits to virtually everyone - not just those who have the resources to seize political power.

A lot of the work in United States is highly critical of technology. I'm using 15,000 watts of power and 18 different pieces of electronic equipment to say that.

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