pilot

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[Pi┬Ělot]

A pilot leads the way. An aircraft pilot flies a plane, and a maritime pilot steers a ship. Also, to pilot is to guide to safety, like to navigate a ship out of a harbor or through a sea of zombies.

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One employed to steer a vessel; a helmsman; a steersman.

Noun
an inclined metal frame at the front of a locomotive to clear the track

Noun
small auxiliary gas burner that provides a flame to ignite a larger gas burner

Noun
an original model on which something is patterned

Noun
a program exemplifying a contemplated series; intended to attract sponsors

Noun
someone who is licensed to operate an aircraft in flight

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Noun
a person qualified to guide ships through difficult waters going into or out of a harbor

Verb
act as the navigator in a car, plane, or vessel and plan, direct, plot the path and position of the conveyance; "Is anyone volunteering to navigate during the trip?"; "Who was navigating the ship during the accident?"

Verb
fly a plane


n.
One employed to steer a vessel; a helmsman; a steersman.

n.
Specifically, a person duly qualified, and licensed by authority, to conduct vessels into and out of a port, or in certain waters, for a fixed rate of fees.

n.
Figuratively: A guide; a director of another through a difficult or unknown course.

n.
An instrument for detecting the compass error.

n.
The cowcatcher of a locomotive.

v. t.
To direct the course of, as of a ship, where navigation is dangerous.

v. t.
Figuratively: To guide, as through dangers or difficulties.


Pilot

Pi"lot , n. [F. pilote, prob. from D. peillood plummet, sounding lead; peilen, pegelen, to sound, measure (fr. D. & G. peil, pegel, a sort of measure, water mark) + lood lead, akin to E. lead. The pilot, then, is the lead man, i.e., he who throws the lead. See Pail, and Lead a metal.] 1. (Naut.) One employed to steer a vessel; a helmsman; a steersman. Dryden. 2. Specifically, a person duly qualified, and licensed by authority, to conduct vessels into and out of a port, or in certain waters, for a fixed rate of fees. 3. Figuratively: A guide; a director of another through a difficult or unknown course. 4. An instrument for detecting the compass error. 5. The cowcatcher of a locomotive. [U.S.] Pilot balloon, a small balloon sent up in advance of a large one, to show the direction and force of the wind. -- Pilot bird. (Zo'94l.) (a) A bird found near the Caribbee Islands; -- so called because its presence indicates to mariners their approach to these islands. Crabb. (b) The black-bellied plover. [Local, U.S.] -- Pilot boat, a strong, fast-sailing boat used to carry and receive pilots as they board and leave vessels. -- Pilot bread, ship biscuit. -- Pilot cloth, a coarse, stout kind of cloth for overcoats. -- Pilot engine, a locomotive going in advance of a train to make sure that the way is clear. -- Pilot fish. (Zo'94l) (a) A pelagic carangoid fish (Naucrates ductor); -- so named because it is often seen in company with a shark, swimming near a ship, on account of which sailors imagine that it acts as a pilot to the shark. (b) The rudder fish (Seriola zonata). -- Pilot jack, a flag or signal hoisted by a vessel for a pilot. -- Pilot jacket, a pea jacket. -- Pilot nut (Bridge Building), a conical nut applied temporarily to the threaded end of a pin, to protect the thread and guide the pin when it is driven into a hole. Waddell. -- Pilot snake (Zo'94l.) (a) A large North American snake (Coluber obsoleus). It is lustrous black, with white edges to some of the scales. Called also mountain black snake. (b) The pine snake. -- Pilot whale. (Zo'94l.) Same as Blackfish, 1.

Pilot

Pi"lot, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Piloted; p. pr. & vb. n. Piloting.] [Cf. F. piloter.] 1. To direct the course of, as of a ship, where navigation is dangerous. 2. Figuratively: To guide, as through dangers or difficulties. "The art of piloting a state." Berkeley.

One employed to steer a vessel; a helmsman; a steersman.

To direct the course of, as of a ship, where navigation is dangerous.

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Usage Examples

With 'Twilight,' you have these massive tomes that you have to condense. With 'Penoza,' we had an eight episode Dutch series that, just for the pilot alone, I condensed three episodes. So, there's a lot of filling in and a ton of invention that has to happen to fill out eight episodes.

I really liked the helicopter pilot in 'Dawn of the Dead', when he gets bitten and comes out of the elevator. That guy was amazing. He did this incredible walk that we didn't even know about until we started shooting.

The pilot looked at his cues of attitude and speed and orientation and so on and responded as he would from the same cues in an airplane, but there was no way it flew the same. The simulators had showed us that.

We're just into toys, whether it's motorcycles or race cars or computers. I've got the Palm Pilot right here with me, I've got the world's smallest phone. Maybe it's just because I'm still a big little kid and I just love toys, you know?

You get to actually see the music video on the TV in the pilot and we have the soundtrack playing at this big party. I thought that was sort of a cool moment, to actually have the A-Ha video is pretty cool.

Misspelled Form

pilot, opilot, 0pilot, lpilot, oilot, 0ilot, lilot, poilot, p0ilot, plilot, puilot, p8ilot, p9ilot, poilot, pjilot, pkilot, pulot, p8lot, p9lot, polot, pjlot, pklot, piulot, pi8lot, pi9lot, piolot, pijlot, piklot, piklot, piolot, piplot, pi:lot, pikot, pioot, pipot, pi:ot, pilkot, piloot, pilpot, pil:ot, piliot, pil9ot, pil0ot, pilpot, pillot, pilit, pil9t, pil0t, pilpt, pillt, piloit, pilo9t, pilo0t, pilopt, pilolt, pilort, pilo5t, pilo6t, piloyt, pilogt, pilor, pilo5, pilo6, piloy, pilog, pilotr, pilot5, pilot6, piloty, pilotg.

Other Usage Examples

My dad is a pilot so I think I was born with the travel bug.

Seeing that a Pilot steers the ship in which we sail, who will never allow us to perish even in the midst of shipwrecks, there is no reason why our minds should be overwhelmed with fear and overcome with weariness.

Knowledge is the eye of desire and can become the pilot of the soul.

When I read the pilot 'for Married with Children', it just reminded me of my Uncle Joe... just a self-deprecating kind of guy. He'd come home from work, and the wife would maybe say 'I ran over the dog this morning in the driveway'. And he would say 'Fine, what's for dinner?

So, I'm happy to do that because it's a wonderful working relationship but I will be going out for pilot season for half hour work and that's the gamble I'm taking.

My grandfather was a general in the Nationalist Chinese Air Force during World War II, and I grew up hearing the pilot stories and seeing pictures of him in uniform.

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