pile

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[pile]

A pile is a heap of stuff that keeps accumulating, like the dirty laundry in the back of your closet, or Uncle Scrooge’s money.

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A hair; hence, the fiber of wool, cotton, and the like; also, the nap when thick or heavy, as of carpeting and velvet.

Noun
a nuclear reactor that uses controlled nuclear fission to generate energy

Noun
the yarn (as in a rug or velvet or corduroy) that stands up from the weave; "for uniform color and texture tailors cut velvet with the pile running the same direction"

Noun
a column of wood or steel or concrete that is driven into the ground to provide support for a structure

Noun
battery consisting of voltaic cells arranged in series; the earliest electric battery devised by Volta

Noun
fine soft dense hair (as the fine short hair of cattle or deer or the wool of sheep or the undercoat of certain dogs)

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Noun
a collection of objects laid on top of each other

Noun
a large sum of money (especially as pay or profit); "she made a bundle selling real estate"; "they sank megabucks into their new house"

Noun
(often followed by `of'') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "it must have cost plenty"

Verb
place or lay as if in a pile; "The teacher piled work on the students until the parents protested"

Verb
arrange in stacks; "heap firewood around the fireplace"; "stack your books up on the shelves"

Verb
press tightly together or cram; "The crowd packed the auditorium"


n.
A hair; hence, the fiber of wool, cotton, and the like; also, the nap when thick or heavy, as of carpeting and velvet.

n.
A covering of hair or fur.

n.
The head of an arrow or spear.

n.
A large stake, or piece of timber, pointed and driven into the earth, as at the bottom of a river, or in a harbor where the ground is soft, for the support of a building, a pier, or other superstructure, or to form a cofferdam, etc.

n.
One of the ordinaries or subordinaries having the form of a wedge, usually placed palewise, with the broadest end uppermost.

v. t.
To drive piles into; to fill with piles; to strengthen with piles.

n.
A mass of things heaped together; a heap; as, a pile of stones; a pile of wood.

n.
A mass formed in layers; as, a pile of shot.

n.
A funeral pile; a pyre.

n.
A large building, or mass of buildings.

n.
Same as Fagot, n., 2.

n.
A vertical series of alternate disks of two dissimilar metals, as copper and zinc, laid up with disks of cloth or paper moistened with acid water between them, for producing a current of electricity; -- commonly called Volta's pile, voltaic pile, or galvanic pile.

n.
The reverse of a coin. See Reverse.

v. t.
To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; -- often with up; as, to pile up wood.

v. t.
To cover with heaps; or in great abundance; to fill or overfill; to load.


Pile

Pile , n. [L. pilus hair. Cf. Peruke.] 1. A hair; hence, the fiber of wool, cotton, and the like; also, the nap when thick or heavy, as of carpeting and velvet.
Velvet soft, or plush with shaggy pile.
2. (Zo'94l.) A covering of hair or fur.

Pile

Pile, n. [L. pilum javelin. See Pile a stake.] The head of an arrow or spear. [Obs.] Chapman.

Pile

Pile, n. [AS. p'c6l arrow, stake, L. pilum javelin; but cf. also L. pila pillar.] 1. A large stake, or piece of timber, pointed and driven into the earth, as at the bottom of a river, or in a harbor where the ground is soft, for the support of a building, a pier, or other superstructure, or to form a cofferdam, etc. &hand; Tubular iron piles are now much used. 2. [Cf. F. pile.] (Her.) One of the ordinaries or subordinaries having the form of a wedge, usually placed palewise, with the broadest end uppermost. Pile bridge, a bridge of which the roadway is supported on piles. -- Pile cap, a beam resting upon and connecting the heads of piles. -- Pile driver, ∨ Pile engine, an apparatus for driving down piles, consisting usually of a high frame, with suitable appliances for raising to a height (by animal or steam power, the explosion of gunpowder, etc.) a heavy mass of iron, which falls upon the pile. -- Pile dwelling. See Lake dwelling, under Lake. -- Pile plank (Hydraul. Eng.), a thick plank used as a pile in sheet piling. See Sheet piling, under Piling. -- Pneumatic pile. See under Pneumatic. -- Screw pile, one with a screw at the lower end, and sunk by rotation aided by pressure.

Pile

Pile, v. t. To drive piles into; to fill with piles; to strengthen with piles. To sheet-pile, to make sheet piling in or around. See Sheet piling, under 2nd Piling.

Pile

Pile, n. [F. pile, L. pila a pillar, a pier or mole of stone. Cf. Pillar.] 1. A mass of things heaped together; a heap; as, a pile of stones; a pile of wood. 2. A mass formed in layers; as, a pile of shot. 3. A funeral pile; a pyre. Dryden. 4. A large building, or mass of buildings.
The pile o'erlooked the town and drew the fight.
5. (Iron Manuf.) Same as Fagot, n., 2. 6. (Elec.) A vertical series of alternate disks of two dissimilar metals, as copper and zinc, laid up with disks of cloth or paper moistened with acid water between them, for producing a current of electricity; -- commonly called Volta's pile, voltaic pile, or galvanic pile. &hand; The term is sometimes applied to other forms of apparatus designed to produce a current of electricity, or as synonymous with battery; as, for instance, to an apparatus for generating a current of electricity by the action of heat, usually called a thermopile. 7. [F. pile pile, an engraved die, L. pila a pillar.] The reverse of a coin. See Reverse. Cross and pile. See under Cross. -- Dry pile. See under Dry.

Pile

Pile, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Piled ; p. pr. & vb. n. Piling.] 1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; -- often with up; as, to pile up wood. "Hills piled on hills." Dryden. "Life piled on life." Tennyson.
The labor of an age in piled stones.
2. To cover with heaps; or in great abundance; to fill or overfill; to load. To pile arms ∨ muskets (Mil.), to place three guns together so that they may stand upright, supporting each other; to stack arms.

A hair; hence, the fiber of wool, cotton, and the like; also, the nap when thick or heavy, as of carpeting and velvet.

The head of an arrow or spear.

A large stake, or piece of timber, pointed and driven into the earth, as at the bottom of a river, or in a harbor where the ground is soft, for the support of a building, a pier, or other superstructure, or to form a cofferdam, etc.

To drive piles into; to fill with piles; to strengthen with piles.

A mass of things heaped together; a heap; as, a pile of stones; a pile of wood.

To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; -- often with up; as, to pile up wood.

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Usage Examples

Stargate by far is the top of the pile when it comes to Sci-Fi. The quality is great. They have really good writers, production design, lighting, wardrobe.

I tried the Atkins diet in the Seventies when pregnant with my son, as I didn't want to pile on the pounds. Now, so long as I'm healthy, I don't care what my scales say.

Is education possibly a process of trading awareness for things of lesser worth? The goose who trades his is soon a pile of feathers.

To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk.

A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

It was like there was a pile of kindling that was in the back of my imagination just waiting there. Once I lit it, it just flared up and I kept getting ideas and ideas.

Misspelled Form

pile, opile, 0pile, lpile, oile, 0ile, lile, poile, p0ile, plile, puile, p8ile, p9ile, poile, pjile, pkile, pule, p8le, p9le, pole, pjle, pkle, piule, pi8le, pi9le, piole, pijle, pikle, pikle, piole, piple, pi:le, pike, pioe, pipe, pi:e, pilke, piloe, pilpe, pil:e, pilwe, pil3e, pil4e, pilre, pilse, pilde, pilw, pil3, pil4, pilr, pils, pild, pilew, pile3, pile4, piler, piles, piled.

Other Usage Examples

We're going to need to absorb some pain. The Republicans want to pile all the pain on people who can least afford it and the middle class and Democrats under his leadership want to make sure that we can address deficit reduction and continue to make investments and shared sacrifice is going to be imperative in order to be able to do that.

You have to spend a lot to make a lot. It's not like I'm sitting on top of a pile of money.

We hear the stories every day now: the father who puts on a suit every morning and leaves the house so his daughter doesn't know he lost his job, the recent college grad facing up to the painful reality that the only door that's open to her after four years of study and a pile of debt is her parents'. These are the faces of the Obama economy.

If you have an important point to make, don't try to be subtle or clever. Use a pile driver. Hit the point once. Then come back and hit it again. Then hit it a third time - a tremendous whack.

I wish my parents hadn't made me feel that how I looked was linked to how much they loved me. But I do also see how hard it must be to see your child pile on the pounds and trust they'll find their own way back to a healthy weight.

My mother would give my brothers and me a pile of catalogues and let us pick what we wanted for Christmas.

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