persons

...
[per┬Ěson]

A human being is called a person, and while this applies to an actual individual, it also, in grammar, means the type of person first person being "I me," second person being "you," and third person being "he him," "she her," or "they them."

...

A character or part, as in a play; a specific kind or manifestation of individual character, whether in real life, or in literary or dramatic representation; an assumed character.

Noun
a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"

Noun
a person''s body (usually including their clothing); "a weapon was hidden on his person"

Noun
a grammatical category of pronouns and verb forms; "stop talking about yourself in the third person"


n.
A character or part, as in a play; a specific kind or manifestation of individual character, whether in real life, or in literary or dramatic representation; an assumed character.

n.
The bodily form of a human being; body; outward appearance; as, of comely person.

n.
A living, self-conscious being, as distinct from an animal or a thing; a moral agent; a human being; a man, woman, or child.

n.
A human being spoken of indefinitely; one; a man; as, any person present.

n.
A parson; the parish priest.

n.
Among Trinitarians, one of the three subdivisions of the Godhead (the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost); an hypostasis.

n.
One of three relations or conditions (that of speaking, that of being spoken to, and that of being spoken of) pertaining to a noun or a pronoun, and thence also to the verb of which it may be the subject.

n.
A shoot or bud of a plant; a polyp or zooid of the compound Hydrozoa Anthozoa, etc.; also, an individual, in the narrowest sense, among the higher animals.

v. t.
To represent as a person; to personify; to impersonate.


Person

Per"son , n. [OE. persone, persoun, person, parson, OF. persone, F. personne, L. persona a mask (used by actors), a personage, part, a person, fr. personare to sound through; per + sonare to sound. See Per-, and cf. Parson.] 1. A character or part, as in a play; a specific kind or manifestation of individual character, whether in real life, or in literary or dramatic representation; an assumed character. [Archaic]
His first appearance upon the stage in his new person of a sycophant or juggler.
No man can long put on a person and act a part.
To bear rule, which was thy part And person, hadst thou known thyself aright.
How different is the same man from himself, as he sustains the person of a magistrate and that of a friend!
2. The bodily form of a human being; body; outward appearance; as, of comely person.
A fair persone, and strong, and young of age.
If it assume my noble father's person.
Love, sweetness, goodness, in her person shined.
3. , self-conscious being, as distinct from an animal or a thing; a moral agent; a human being; a man, woman, or child.
Consider what person stands for; which, I think, is a thinking, intelligent being, that has reason and reflection.
4. A human being spoken of indefinitely; one; a man; as, any person present. 5. A parson; the parish priest. [Obs.] Chaucer. 6. (Theol.) Among Trinitarians, one of the three subdivisions of the Godhead (the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost); an hypostasis. "Three persons and one God." Bk. of Com. Prayer. 7. (Gram.) One of three relations or conditions (that of speaking, that of being spoken to, and that of being spoken of) pertaining to a noun or a pronoun, and thence also to the verb of which it may be the subject. &hand; A noun or pronoun, when representing the speaker, is said to be in the first person; when representing what is spoken to, in the second person; when representing what is spoken of, in the third person. 8. (Biol.) A shoot or bud of a plant; a polyp or zooid of the compound Hydrozoa Anthozoa, etc.; also, an individual, in the narrowest sense, among the higher animals. Haeckel.
True corms, composed of united person'91 . . . usually arise by gemmation, . . . yet in sponges and corals occasionally by fusion of several originally distinct persons.
Artificial, ∨ Fictitious, person (Law), a corporation or body politic. blackstone. -- Natural person (Law), a man, woman, or child, in distinction from a corporation. -- In person, by one's self; with bodily presence; not by representative. "The king himself in person is set forth." Shak. -- In the person of, in the place of; acting for. Shak.

Person

Per"son , v. t. To represent as a person; to personify; to impersonate. [Obs.] Milton.

A character or part, as in a play; a specific kind or manifestation of individual character, whether in real life, or in literary or dramatic representation; an assumed character.

To represent as a person; to personify; to impersonate.

...

Usage Examples

A great source of calamity lies in regret and anticipation therefore a person is wise who thinks of the present alone, regardless of the past or future.

A mathematician is a person who can find analogies between theorems a better mathematician is one who can see analogies between proofs and the best mathematician can notice analogies between theories.

A mustache really defines your face. My dad had a mustache when I was growing up, and I can still remember when he shaved it, he looked like a completely different person.

A good scientist is a person with original ideas. A good engineer is a person who makes a design that works with as few original ideas as possible. There are no prima donnas in engineering.

'The Cut' is going to give someone the opportunity of a lifetime and help that person achieve his or her dreams.

A famous person to themselves, they don't get up in the morning and think, I'm famous. I'm not famous to me. Famous is a perception.

A humorist is a person who feels bad, but who feels good about it.

A great thing can only be done by a great person and they do it without effort.

Misspelled Form

persons, opersons, 0persons, lpersons, oersons, 0ersons, lersons, poersons, p0ersons, plersons, pwersons, p3ersons, p4ersons, prersons, psersons, pdersons, pwrsons, p3rsons, p4rsons, prrsons, psrsons, pdrsons, pewrsons, pe3rsons, pe4rsons, perrsons, pesrsons, pedrsons, peersons, pe4rsons, pe5rsons, petrsons, pefrsons, peesons, pe4sons, pe5sons, petsons, pefsons, peresons, per4sons, per5sons, pertsons, perfsons, perasons, perwsons, peresons, perdsons, perxsons, perzsons, peraons, perwons, pereons, perdons, perxons, perzons, persaons, perswons, perseons, persdons, persxons, perszons, persions, pers9ons, pers0ons, perspons, perslons, persins, pers9ns, pers0ns, perspns, perslns, persoins, perso9ns, perso0ns, persopns, persolns, persobns, persohns, persojns, persomns, perso ns, persobs, persohs, persojs, persoms, perso s, personbs, personhs, personjs, personms, person s, personas, personws, persones, personds, personxs, personzs, persona, personw, persone, persond, personx, personz, personsa, personsw, personse, personsd, personsx, personsz.

Other Usage Examples

A competent and self-confident person is incapable of jealousy in anything. Jealousy is invariably a symptom of neurotic insecurity.

A diplomat is a person who can tell you to go to hell in such a way that you actually look forward to the trip.

A beautiful person is someone who stays true to themselves and their spirit someone who is self-confident and can make you smile.

A good person can make another person good it means that goodness will elicit goodness in the society other persons will also be good.

A good teacher is a determined person.

A father is a person who's around, participating in a child's life. He's a teacher who helps to guide and shape and mold that young person, someone for that young person to talk to, to share with, their ups and their downs, their fears and their concerns.

A company can spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on firewalls, intrusion detection systems and encryption and other security technologies, but if an attacker can call one trusted person within the company, and that person complies, and if the attacker gets in, then all that money spent on technology is essentially wasted.

"These days the technology can solve our problems and then some. Solutions may not only erase physical or mental deficits but leave patients better off than ""able-bodied"" folks. The person who has a disability today may have a superability tomorrow."

Comments


Browse Dictionary