organic

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[Or*ganĀ·ic]

If you take up organic farming, be sure to use organic fertilizer, not some artificial chemical. Organic describes things that are natural or related to nature.

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Of or pertaining to an organ or its functions, or to objects composed of organs; consisting of organs, or containing them; as, the organic structure of animals and plants; exhibiting characters peculiar to living organisms; as, organic bodies, organic life, organic remains. Cf. Inorganic.

Noun
a fertilizer that is derived from animal or vegetable matter

Adjective S.
constitutional in the structure of something (especially your physical makeup)

Adjective
involving or affecting physiology or bodily organs; "an organic disease"

Adjective S.
simple and healthful and close to nature; "an organic lifestyle"

Adjective
relating or belonging to the class of chemical compounds having a carbon basis; "hydrocarbons are organic compounds"

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Adjective
being or relating to or derived from or having properties characteristic of living organisms; "organic life"; "organic growth"; "organic remains found in rock"

Adjective S.
of or relating to foodstuff grown or raised without synthetic fertilizers or pesticides or hormones; "organic eggs"; "organic vegetables"; "organic chicken"

Adjective
of or relating to or derived from living organisms; "organic soil"


a.
Of or pertaining to an organ or its functions, or to objects composed of organs; consisting of organs, or containing them; as, the organic structure of animals and plants; exhibiting characters peculiar to living organisms; as, organic bodies, organic life, organic remains. Cf. Inorganic.

a.
Produced by the organs; as, organic pleasure.

a.
Instrumental; acting as instruments of nature or of art to a certain destined function or end.

a.
Forming a whole composed of organs. Hence: Of or pertaining to a system of organs; inherent in, or resulting from, a certain organization; as, an organic government; his love of truth was not inculcated, but organic.

a.
Pertaining to, or denoting, any one of the large series of substances which, in nature or origin, are connected with vital processes, and include many substances of artificial production which may or may not occur in animals or plants; -- contrasted with inorganic.


Organic

Or*gan"ic , a. [L. organicus, Gr. : cf. F. organique.] 1. (Biol.) Of or pertaining to an organ or its functions, or to objects composed of organs; consisting of organs, or containing them; as, the organic structure of animals and plants; exhibiting characters peculiar to living organisms; as, organic bodies, organic life, organic remains. Cf. Inorganic. 2. Produced by the organs; as, organic pleasure. [R.] 3. Instrumental; acting as instruments of nature or of art to a certain destined function or end. [R.]
Those organic arts which enable men to discourse and write perspicuously.
4. Forming a whole composed of organs. Hence: Of or pertaining to a system of organs; inherent in, or resulting from, a certain organization; as, an organic government; his love of truth was not inculcated, but organic. 5. Pertaining to, or denoting, any one of the large series of substances which, in nature or origin, are connected with vital processes, and include many substances of artificial production which may or may not occur in animals or plants; -- contrasted with inorganic. &hand; The principles of organic and inorganic chemistry are identical; but the enormous number and the completeness of related series of organic compounds, together with their remarkable facility of exchange and substitution, offer an illustration of chemical reaction and homology not to be paralleled in inorganic chemistry. Organic analysis (Chem.), the analysis of organic compounds, concerned chiefly with the determination of carbon as carbon dioxide, hydrogen as water, oxygen as the difference between the sum of the others and 100 per cent, and nitrogen as free nitrogen, ammonia, or nitric oxide; -- formerly called ultimate analysis, in distinction from proximate analysis. -- Organic chemistry. See under Chemistry. -- Organic compounds. (Chem.) See Carbon compounds, under Carbon. -- Organic description of a curve (Geom.), the description of a curve on a plane by means of instruments. Brande & C. -- Organic disease (Med.), a disease attended with morbid changes in the structure of the organs of the body or in the composition of its fluids; -- opposed to functional disease. -- Organic electricity. See under Electricity. -- Organic law ∨ laws, a law or system of laws, or declaration of principles fundamental to the existence and organization of a political or other association; a constitution. -- Organic stricture (Med.), a contraction of one of the natural passages of the body produced by structural changes in its walls, as distinguished from a spasmodic stricture, which is due to muscular contraction.

Of or pertaining to an organ or its functions, or to objects composed of organs; consisting of organs, or containing them; as, the organic structure of animals and plants; exhibiting characters peculiar to living organisms; as, organic bodies, organic life, organic remains. Cf. Inorganic.

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Usage Examples

I'm eating a lot of organic proteins and vegetables! Maintaining a healthy, balanced diet is my No. 1 priority because I'm nursing my daughter.

Let me pose you a question. Can farm-raised salmon be organic when its feed has nothing to do with its natural diet, even if the feed itself is supposedly organic, and the fish themselves are packed tightly in pens, swimming in their own filth?

All living beings, not just animals, but plants and microorganisms, perceive. To survive, an organic being must perceive - it must seek, or at least recognize, food and avoid environmental danger.

Looking back, there is nothing wrong with that peace, love and equality that the hippies espoused. In many ways, we have regressed because they were into organic food, back to nature, make love not war, be good to all men, share and share alike - which is what many are talking about now.

Every major food company now has an organic division. There's more capital going into organic agriculture than ever before.

It's fantastic to strive towards a nice life where you eat nice organic food and your children go to a nice school and you can afford nice clothes and nice perfume and the hypoallergenic make-up. But there's never a day goes by, and I mean this from the bottom of my heart, that I don't think about where I'm from.

I feed my kids organic food and milk, but I've also been known to buy the odd Lunchable. My kids are not allowed to watch TV during the week, but on weekends even the 2-year-old veges out to 'The Simpsons.'

I don't always buy organic food. It is more expensive.

If we as a society are willing to have a preference for organic food, the farmer can pass on the savings.

Misspelled Form

organic, iorganic, 9organic, 0organic, porganic, lorganic, irganic, 9rganic, 0rganic, prganic, lrganic, oirganic, o9rganic, o0rganic, oprganic, olrganic, oerganic, o4rganic, o5rganic, otrganic, ofrganic, oeganic, o4ganic, o5ganic, otganic, ofganic, oreganic, or4ganic, or5ganic, ortganic, orfganic, orfganic, ortganic, oryganic, orhganic, orbganic, orvganic, orfanic, ortanic, oryanic, orhanic, orbanic, orvanic, orgfanic, orgtanic, orgyanic, orghanic, orgbanic, orgvanic, orgqanic, orgwanic, orgsanic, orgzanic, orgqnic, orgwnic, orgsnic, orgznic, orgaqnic, orgawnic, orgasnic, orgaznic, orgabnic, orgahnic, orgajnic, orgamnic, orga nic, orgabic, orgahic, orgajic, orgamic, orga ic, organbic, organhic, organjic, organmic, organ ic, organuic, organ8ic, organ9ic, organoic, organjic, organkic, organuc, organ8c, organ9c, organoc, organjc, organkc, organiuc, organi8c, organi9c, organioc, organijc, organikc, organixc, organidc, organifc, organivc, organi c, organix, organid, organif, organiv, organi , organicx, organicd, organicf, organicv, organic .

Other Usage Examples

If you build up the soil with organic material, the plants will do just fine.

Agricultural practice served Darwin as the material basis for the elaboration of his theory of Evolution, which explained the natural causation of the adaptation we see in the structure of the organic world. That was a great advance in the knowledge of living nature.

Everything is the product of one universal creative effort. There is nothing dead in Nature. Everything is organic and living, and therefore the whole world appears to be a living organism.

A committee is organic rather than mechanical in its nature: it is not a structure but a plant. It takes root and grows, it flowers, wilts, and dies, scattering the seed from which other committees will bloom in their turn.

I record all of my music with authentic instruments in a studio before we start editing, doing many, many versions. The music shapes the film as we edit so it has an organic relationship to the content.

I don't want technology to take me so far that I don't have to use my brain anymore. It's like GPS taking over and losing your internal compass. It's always got to be tactile, still organic.

But some great records are are being made with today's technology and there are still great artists among us. Likewise there are artists today who are so reliant on modern technology, they wouldn't have emerged when recording was more organic.

I cooked at the White House for Easter, last year, with Michelle Obama. But it more had to do with cooking from the organic garden, and her message. I took my daughter and granddaughter there, and they were really charming, it was great.

I think I'm going to give my baby her first food on Thanksgiving, make her some organic sweet potato. I'm very excited! It's going to be a big day and my husband is in charge of the turkey - he's the chef of the family!

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