officer

...
[Of·fi*cer]

An officer is someone who works for a police force or has a high position in the military. Police officers in some towns and cities patrol on bikes, or occasionally even on horseback.

...

One who holds an office; a person lawfully invested with an office, whether civil, military, or ecclesiastical; as, a church officer; a police officer; a staff officer.

Noun
any person in the armed services who holds a position of authority or command; "an officer is responsible for the lives of his men"

Noun
someone who is appointed or elected to an office and who holds a position of trust; "he is an officer of the court"; "the club elected its officers for the coming year"

Noun
a person authorized to serve in a position of authority on a vessel; "he is the officer in charge of the ship''s engines"

Noun
a member of a police force; "it was an accident, officer"

Verb
direct or command as an officer

...

n.
One who holds an office; a person lawfully invested with an office, whether civil, military, or ecclesiastical; as, a church officer; a police officer; a staff officer.

n.
Specifically, a commissioned officer, in distinction from a warrant officer.

v. t.
To furnish with officers; to appoint officers over.

v. t.
To command as an officer; as, veterans from old regiments officered the recruits.


Officer

Of"fi*cer , n. [F. officier. See Office, and cf. Official, n.] 1. One who holds an office; a person lawfully invested with an office, whether civil, military, or ecclesiastical; as, a church officer; a police officer; a staff officer. "I am an officer of state." Shak. 2. (U. S. Mil.) Specifically, a commissioned officer, in distinction from a warrant officer. Field officer, General officer, etc. See under Field, General. etc. -- Officer of the day (Mil.), the officer who, on a given day, has charge for that day of the quard, prisoners, and police of the post or camp. -- Officer of the deck, ∨ Officer of the watch (Naut.), the officer temporarily in charge on the deck of a vessel, esp. a war vessel.

Officer

Of"fi*cer, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Officered ; p. pr. & vb. n. Officering.] 1. To furnish with officers; to appoint officers over. Marshall. 2. To command as an officer; as, veterans from old regiments officered the recruits.

One who holds an office; a person lawfully invested with an office, whether civil, military, or ecclesiastical; as, a church officer; a police officer; a staff officer.

To furnish with officers; to appoint officers over.

...

Usage Examples

Our country will, I believe, sooner forgive an officer for attacking an enemy than for letting it alone.

Duty is the great business of a sea officer all private considerations must give way to it, however painful it may be.

Today I can announce a raft of reforms that we estimate could save over 2.5 million police hours every year. That's the equivalent of more than 1,200 police officer posts. These reforms are a watershed moment in policing. They show that we really mean business in busting bureaucracy.

The senior officer who met with reporters in Baghdad said there had been 21 car bombings in the capital in May, and 126 in the past 80 days. All last year, he said, there were only about 25 car bombings in Baghdad.

They basically said that if I didn't show up for school they'd mark me present, they wouldn't send the truant officer after me. At 16 I enrolled in something called continuing education. Once a month I'd go out to Jamaica, but I didn't take it seriously.

You can't be afraid to put out a fire if you're a fireman. You can't be afraid to be a police officer and carry a gun if you're afraid to get up and go out there. So you've got to put that fear to the side and go out in faith to overcome that.

I went to military college in Canada and graduated as an officer in the Navy but also as an engineer.

I never threatened him and no Syrian intelligence officer has ever pointed a gun to his head.

Misspelled Form

officer, iofficer, 9officer, 0officer, pofficer, lofficer, ifficer, 9fficer, 0fficer, pfficer, lfficer, oifficer, o9fficer, o0fficer, opfficer, olfficer, odfficer, orfficer, otfficer, ogfficer, ovfficer, ocfficer, odficer, orficer, otficer, ogficer, ovficer, ocficer, ofdficer, ofrficer, oftficer, ofgficer, ofvficer, ofcficer, ofdficer, ofrficer, oftficer, ofgficer, ofvficer, ofcficer, ofdicer, ofricer, ofticer, ofgicer, ofvicer, ofcicer, offdicer, offricer, offticer, offgicer, offvicer, offcicer, offuicer, off8icer, off9icer, offoicer, offjicer, offkicer, offucer, off8cer, off9cer, offocer, offjcer, offkcer, offiucer, offi8cer, offi9cer, offiocer, offijcer, offikcer, offixcer, offidcer, offifcer, offivcer, offi cer, offixer, offider, offifer, offiver, offi er, officxer, officder, officfer, officver, offic er, officwer, offic3er, offic4er, officrer, officser, officder, officwr, offic3r, offic4r, officrr, officsr, officdr, officewr, office3r, office4r, officerr, officesr, officedr, officeer, office4r, office5r, officetr, officefr, officee, office4, office5, officet, officef, officere, officer4, officer5, officert, officerf.

Other Usage Examples

After the United States entered the war, I joined the Naval Reserve and spent ninety days in a Columbia University dormitory learning to be a naval officer.

I mean you might say he had a travelling post office, but also Barney was very, very active. He was a legal officer for the NAACP and they had a lot of problems after Pease.

I am a military police officer and I have served on two deployments my first was to Iraq, in a medical unit, and my second deployment was to Kuwait, as a military police platoon leader.

In fact, my mom always told me because I was the daughter of an Army officer born overseas in Paris, France, that under the Constitution she believed that I could never run for president.

My life had become a catastrophe. I had no idea how to turn it around. My band had broken up. I had almost lost my family. My whole life had devolved into a disaster. I believe that the police officer who stopped me at three a.m. that morning saved my life.

In a few days an officer came to our camp, under a flag of truce, and informed Hamilton, then a captain of artillery, but afterwards the aid of General Washington, that Captain Hale had been arrested within the British lines condemned as a spy, and executed that morning.

As social media is less about technology and more about relationship building, we are starting to see more women have a heavy influence if not dominant role in the social media space. It's no wonder that Facebook is being run in part by chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg.

All images generated by imaging technology are viewed in a walled-off location not visible to the public. The officer assisting the passenger never sees the image, and the officer viewing the image never interacts with the passenger. The imaging technology that we use cannot store, export, print or transmit images.

However, I had a chance encounter with an admissions officer of Stevens Institute of Technology, who so impressed me by his erudition and enthusiasm for the school that I changed course and entered Stevens Institute.

Comments


Browse Dictionary