office

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[Of·fice]

If you have an office job, it means that you go to work in an office, or a professional business place, every day.

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That which a person does, either voluntarily or by appointment, for, or with reference to, others; customary duty, or a duty that arises from the relations of man to man; as, kind offices, pious offices.

Noun
a job in an organization; "he occupied a post in the treasury"

Noun
the actions and activities assigned to or required or expected of a person or group; "the function of a teacher"; "the government must do its part"; "play its role"

Noun
a religious rite or service prescribed by ecclesiastical authorities; "the offices of the mass"

Noun
place of business where professional or clerical duties are performed; "he rented an office in the new building"

Noun
an administrative unit of government; "the Central Intelligence Agency"; "the Census Bureau"; "Office of Management and Budget"; "Tennessee Valley Authority"

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Noun
professional or clerical workers in an office; "the whole office was late the morning of the blizzard"

Noun
(of a government or government official) holding an office means being in power; "being in office already gives a candidate a great advantage"; "during his first year in office"; "during his first year in power"; "the power of the president"


n.
That which a person does, either voluntarily or by appointment, for, or with reference to, others; customary duty, or a duty that arises from the relations of man to man; as, kind offices, pious offices.

n.
A special duty, trust, charge, or position, conferred by authority and for a public purpose; a position of trust or authority; as, an executive or judical office; a municipal office.

n.
A charge or trust, of a sacred nature, conferred by God himself; as, the office of a priest under the old dispensation, and that of the apostles in the new.

n.
That which is performed, intended, or assigned to be done, by a particular thing, or that which anything is fitted to perform; a function; -- answering to duty in intelligent beings.

n.
The place where a particular kind of business or service for others is transacted; a house or apartment in which public officers and others transact business; as, the register's office; a lawyer's office.

n.
The company or corporation, or persons collectively, whose place of business is in an office; as, I have notified the office.

n.
The apartments or outhouses in which the domestics discharge the duties attached to the service of a house, as kitchens, pantries, stables, etc.

n.
Any service other than that of ordination and the Mass; any prescribed religious service.

v. t.
To perform, as the duties of an office; to discharge.


Office

Of"fice , n. [F., fr. L. officium, for opificium; ops ability, wealth, holp + facere to do or make. See Opulent, Fact.] 1. That which a person does, either voluntarily or by appointment, for, or with reference to, others; customary duty, or a duty that arises from the relations of man to man; as, kind offices, pious offices.
I would I could do a good office between you.
2. A special duty, trust, charge, or position, conferred by authority and for a public purpose; a position of trust or authority; as, an executive or judical office; a municipal office. 3. A charge or trust, of a sacred nature, conferred by God himself; as, the office of a priest under the old dispensation, and that of the apostles in the new.
Inasmuch as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, I magnify mine office.
4. That which is performed, intended, or assigned to be done, by a particular thing, or that which anything is fitted to perform; a function; -- answering to duty in intelligent beings.
They [the eyes] resign their office and their light.
Hesperus, whose office is to bring Twilight upon the earth.
In this experiment the several intervals of the teeth of the comb do the office of so many prisms.
5. The place where a particular kind of business or service for others is transacted; a house or apartment in which public officers and others transact business; as, the register's office; a lawyer's office. 6. The company or corporation, or persons collectively, whose place of business is in an office; as, I have notified the office. 7. pl. The apartments or outhouses in which the domestics discharge the duties attached to the service of a house, as kitchens, pantries, stables, etc. [Eng.]
As for the offices, let them stand at distance.
8. (Eccl.) Any service other than that of ordination and the Mass; any prescribed religious service.
This morning was read in the church, after the office was done, the declaration setting forth the late conspiracy against the king's person.
Holy office. Same as Inquisition, n., 3. -- Houses of office. Same as def. 7 above. Chaucer. -- Little office (R.C.Ch.), an office recited in honor of the Virgin Mary. -- Office bearer, an officer; one who has a specific office or duty to perform. -- Office copy (Law), an authenticated or certified copy of a record, from the proper office. See Certified copies, under Copy. Abbott. -- Office-found (Law), the finding of an inquest of office. See under Inquest. -- Office holder. See Officeholder in the Vocabulary

Office

Of`fice , v. t. To perform, as the duties of an office; to discharge. [Obs.] Shak.

That which a person does, either voluntarily or by appointment, for, or with reference to, others; customary duty, or a duty that arises from the relations of man to man; as, kind offices, pious offices.

To perform, as the duties of an office; to discharge.

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Usage Examples

Equipped with cell phones, beepers, and handheld computers, the 'conspicuously industrious' blur the line between home and office by working anytime, anywhere.

A Nicklaus Design golf course is done by the guys in my company that I work with, that have been trained in my vision, and they do what they think I might do. They might come in the office and ask me questions and I'd certainly answer their questions, but I'm not involved in the site visits or anything else.

As long as I do a good job, I believe the future is going to take care of itself, but actually I like very much being in elected office and there is no consideration about doing anything different until I can be assured that we are going to have the best voting systems in the country.

As they say around the Texas Legislature, if you can't drink their whiskey, screw their women, take their money, and vote against 'em anyway, you don't belong in office.

A politician never forgets the precarious nature of elective life. We have never established a practice of tenure in public office.

I came to the conclusion that in order to end racial barriers, I needed to run for the office of the president and put forth an agenda of social justice and world peace. In addition, I concluded that someone needed to run and challenge the liberal orthodoxy.

And inasmuch as the bridge is a symbol of all such poetry as I am interested in writing it is my present fancy that a year from now I'll be more contented working in an office than ever before.

And after I make a lot of money, I'll be able to afford running for office.

Consul - in American politics, a person who having failed to secure an office from the people is given one by the Administration on condition that he leave the country.

Misspelled Form

office, ioffice, 9office, 0office, poffice, loffice, iffice, 9ffice, 0ffice, pffice, lffice, oiffice, o9ffice, o0ffice, opffice, olffice, odffice, orffice, otffice, ogffice, ovffice, ocffice, odfice, orfice, otfice, ogfice, ovfice, ocfice, ofdfice, ofrfice, oftfice, ofgfice, ofvfice, ofcfice, ofdfice, ofrfice, oftfice, ofgfice, ofvfice, ofcfice, ofdice, ofrice, oftice, ofgice, ofvice, ofcice, offdice, offrice, offtice, offgice, offvice, offcice, offuice, off8ice, off9ice, offoice, offjice, offkice, offuce, off8ce, off9ce, offoce, offjce, offkce, offiuce, offi8ce, offi9ce, offioce, offijce, offikce, offixce, offidce, offifce, offivce, offi ce, offixe, offide, offife, offive, offi e, officxe, officde, officfe, officve, offic e, officwe, offic3e, offic4e, officre, officse, officde, officw, offic3, offic4, officr, offics, officd, officew, office3, office4, officer, offices, officed.

Other Usage Examples

Difference of opinion is advantageous in religion. The several sects perform the office of a Censor - over each other.

All respect for the office of the presidency aside, I assumed that the obvious and unadulterated decline of freedom and constitutional sovereignty, not to mention the efforts to curb the power of judicial review, spoke for itself.

As the Nation's primary supporter of research in the physical sciences, the DOE Office of Science led the way in creating a unique system of large-scale, specialized, often one-of-a-kind facilities for scientific discovery.

For the blue-collar worker, the driving force behind change was factory automation using programmable machine tools. For the office worker, it's office automation using computer technology: enterprise-resource-planning systems, groupware, intranets, extranets, expert systems, the Web, and e-commerce.

I always supported the women I worked with having time off to go to parent-teacher conferences and doctors' appointments or bringing their infants into the office.

I always enjoyed politics. I worked at the White House recently, primarily for the First Lady. Because of my experience running my travel agency, I was in charge of the files she kept on the Travel Office.

I had a 2-week courtship with a fellow student in the fiction workshop in Iowa and a 5-minute wedding in a lawyer's office above the coffee shop where we'd been having lunch that day. And so I sent a cable to my father saying, 'By the time you get this, Daddy, I'll already be Mrs. Blaise!'

Clinton is a big personality who has led a big life, and for some of the media conventional wisdom to boil it down to a view that 'all people are really interested in' are a few moments of madness in the Oval Office gets him, the importance of the presidency, and the significance of his life, all wrong.

Anyone who can walk to the welfare office can walk to work.

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