natural

...
[Nat·u*ral]

Natural describes something that comes from nature, rather than being man made. Your healthy friend who only eats natural food will probably choose carrots instead of potato chips for a snack.

...

Fixed or determined by nature; pertaining to the constitution of a thing; belonging to native character; according to nature; essential; characteristic; not artifical, foreign, assumed, put on, or acquired; as, the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color.

Noun
(craps) a first roll of 7 or 11 that immediately wins the stake

Noun
a notation cancelling a previous sharp or flat

Noun
someone regarded as certain to succeed; "he''s a natural for the job"

Adjective S.
unaffected and natural looking; "a lifelike pose"; "a natural reaction"

Adjective S.
being talented through inherited qualities; "a natural leader"; "a born musician"; "an innate talent"

...

Adjective S.
related by blood; not adopted; "natural parent"

Adjective
in accordance with nature; relating to or concerning nature; "a very natural development"; "our natural environment"; "natural science"; "natural resources"; "natural cliffs"; "natural phenomena"

Adjective
existing in or produced by nature; not artificial or imitation; "a natural pearl"; "natural gas"; "natural silk"; "natural blonde hair"; "a natural sweetener"; "natural fertilizers"

Adjective
existing in or in conformity with nature or the observable world; neither supernatural nor magical; "a perfectly natural explanation"

Adjective
of a key containing no sharps or flats; "B natural"

Adjective S.
functioning or occurring in a normal way; lacking abnormalities or deficiencies; "it''s the natural thing to happen"; "natural immunity"; "a grandparent''s natural affection for a grandchild"

Adjective S.
(used especially of commodities) in the natural unprocessed condition; "natural yogurt"; "natural produce"; "raw wool"; "raw sugar"; "bales of rude cotton"

Adjective S.
unthinking; prompted by (or as if by) instinct; "a cat''s natural aversion to water"; "offering to help was as instinctive as breathing"


a.
Fixed or determined by nature; pertaining to the constitution of a thing; belonging to native character; according to nature; essential; characteristic; not artifical, foreign, assumed, put on, or acquired; as, the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color.

a.
Conformed to the order, laws, or actual facts, of nature; consonant to the methods of nature; according to the stated course of things, or in accordance with the laws which govern events, feelings, etc.; not exceptional or violent; legitimate; normal; regular; as, the natural consequence of crime; a natural death.

a.
Having to do with existing system to things; dealing with, or derived from, the creation, or the world of matter and mind, as known by man; within the scope of human reason or experience; not supernatural; as, a natural law; natural science; history, theology.

a.
Conformed to truth or reality

a.
Springing from true sentiment; not artifical or exaggerated; -- said of action, delivery, etc.; as, a natural gesture, tone, etc.

a.
Resembling the object imitated; true to nature; according to the life; -- said of anything copied or imitated; as, a portrait is natural.

a.
Having the character or sentiments properly belonging to one's position; not unnatural in feelings.

a.
Connected by the ties of consanguinity.

a.
Begotten without the sanction of law; born out of wedlock; illegitimate; bastard; as, a natural child.

a.
Of or pertaining to the lower or animal nature, as contrasted with the higher or moral powers, or that which is spiritual; being in a state of nature; unregenerate.

a.
Belonging to, to be taken in, or referred to, some system, in which the base is 1; -- said or certain functions or numbers; as, natural numbers, those commencing at 1; natural sines, cosines, etc., those taken in arcs whose radii are 1.

a.
Produced by natural organs, as those of the human throat, in distinction from instrumental music.

a.
Of or pertaining to a key which has neither a flat nor a sharp for its signature, as the key of C major.

a.
Applied to an air or modulation of harmony which moves by easy and smooth transitions, digressing but little from the original key.

n.
A native; an aboriginal.

n.
Natural gifts, impulses, etc.

n.
One born without the usual powers of reason or understanding; an idiot.

n.
A character [/] used to contradict, or to remove the effect of, a sharp or flat which has preceded it, and to restore the unaltered note.


Natural

Nat"u*ral , a. [OE. naturel, F. naturel, fr. L. naturalis, fr. natura. See Nature.] 1. Fixed or determined by nature; pertaining to the constitution of a thing; belonging to native character; according to nature; essential; characteristic; not artifical, foreign, assumed, put on, or acquired; as, the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color.
With strong natural sense, and rare force of will.
2. Conformed to the order, laws, or actual facts, of nature; consonant to the methods of nature; according to the stated course of things, or in accordance with the laws which govern events, feelings, etc.; not exceptional or violent; legitimate; normal; regular; as, the natural consequence of crime; a natural death.
What can be more natural than the circumstances in the behavior of those women who had lost their husbands on this fatal day?
3. Having to do with existing system to things; dealing with, or derived from, the creation, or the world of matter and mind, as known by man; within the scope of human reason or experience; not supernatural; as, a natural law; natural science; history, theology.
I call that natural religion which men might know ... by the mere principles of reason, improved by consideration and experience, without the help of revelation.
4. Conformed to truth or reality; as: (a) Springing from true sentiment; not artifical or exaggerated; -- said of action, delivery, etc.; as, a natural gesture, tone, etc. (b) Resembling the object imitated; true to nature; according to the life; -- said of anything copied or imitated; as, a portrait is natural. 5. Having the character or sentiments properly belonging to one's position; not unnatural in feelings.
To leave his wife, to leave his babes, ... He wants the natural touch.
6. Connected by the ties of consanguinity. "Natural friends." J. H. Newman. 7. Begotten without the sanction of law; born out of wedlock; illegitimate; bastard; as, a natural child. 8. Of or pertaining to the lower or animal nature, as contrasted with the higher or moral powers, or that which is spiritual; being in a state of nature; unregenerate.
The natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God.
9. (Math.) Belonging to, to be taken in, or referred to, some system, in which the base is 1; -- said or certain functions or numbers; as, natural numbers, those commencing at 1; natural sines, cosines, etc., those taken in arcs whose radii are 1. 10. (Mus.) (a) Produced by natural organs, as those of the human throat, in distinction from instrumental music. (b) of or pertaining to a key which has neither a flat nor a sharp for its signature, as the key of C major. (c) Applied to an air or modulation of harmony which moves by easy and smooth transitions, digressing but little from the original key. Moore (Encyc. of Music). Natural day, the space of twenty-four hours. Chaucer. -- Natural fats, Natural gas, etc. See under Fat, Gas. etc. -- Natural Harmony (Mus.), the harmony of the triad or common chord. -- Natural history, in its broadest sense, a history or description of nature as a whole, incuding the sciences of botany, zo'94logy, geology, mineralogy, paleontology, chemistry, and physics. In recent usage the term is often restricted to the sciences of botany and zo'94logy collectively, and sometimes to the science of zoology alone. -- Natural law, that instinctive sense of justice and of right and wrong, which is native in mankind, as distinguished from specifically revealed divine law, and formulated human law. -- Natural modulation (Mus.), transition from one key to its relative keys. -- Natural order. (Nat. Hist.) See under order. -- Natural person. (Law) See under person, n. -- Natural philosophy, originally, the study of nature in general; in modern usage, that branch of physical science, commonly called physics, which treats of the phenomena and laws of matter and considers those effects only which are unaccompanied by any change of a chemical nature; -- contrasted with mental and moral philosophy. -- Natural scale (Mus.), a scale which is written without flats or sharps. Model would be a preferable term, as less likely to mislead, the so-called artificial scales (scales represented by the use of flats and sharps) being equally natural with the so-called natural scale -- Natural science, natural history, in its broadest sense; -- used especially in contradistinction to mental or moral science. -- Natural selection (Biol.), a supposed operation of natural laws analogous, in its operation and results, to designed selection in breeding plants and animals, and resulting in the survival of the fittest. The theory of natural selection supposes that this has been brought about mainly by gradual changes of environment which have led to corresponding changes of structure, and that those forms which have become so modified as to be best adapted to the changed environment have tended to survive and leave similarly adapted descendants, while those less perfectly adapted have tended to die out though lack of fitness for the environment, thus resulting in the survival of the fittest. See Darwinism. -- Natural system (Bot. & Zo'94l.), a classification based upon real affinities, as shown in the structure of all parts of the organisms, and by their embryology.
It should be borne in mind that the natural system of botany is natural only in the constitution of its genera, tribes, orders, etc., and in its grand divisions.
-- Natural theology, ∨ Natural religion, that part of theological science which treats of those evidences of the existence and attributes of the Supreme Being which are exhibited in nature; -- distinguished from revealed religion. See Quotation under Natural, a., 3. -- Natural vowel, the vowel sound heard in urn, furl, sir, her, etc.; -- so called as being uttered in the easiest open position of the mouth organs. See Neutral vowel, under Neutral and Guide to Pronunciation, § 17.
Syn. -- See Native.

Natural

Nat"u*ral , n. 1. A native; an aboriginal. [Obs.] Sir W. Raleigh. 2. pl. Natural gifts, impulses, etc. [Obs.] Fuller. 3. One born without the usual powers of reason or understanding; an idiot. "The minds of naturals." Locke. 4. (Mus.) A character [♮] used to contradict, or to remove the effect of, a sharp or flat which has preceded it, and to restore the unaltered note.

Fixed or determined by nature; pertaining to the constitution of a thing; belonging to native character; according to nature; essential; characteristic; not artifical, foreign, assumed, put on, or acquired; as, the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color.

A native; an aboriginal.

...

Usage Examples

Anybody under the age of forty knows hip-hop, gospel and R&B pretty well, and it's all a part of what we consider to be 'black music.' There is a natural synergy between the three.

An attitude of philosophic doubt, of suspended judgment, is repugnant to the natural man. Belief is an independent joy to him.

Among the natural rights of the colonists are these: First a right to life, secondly to liberty, and thirdly to property together with the right to defend them in the best manner they can.

A well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained in arms, is the best most natural defense of a free country.

At the end of the day, my natural habitat is in a car and I am happiest in that environment.

A technical solution may be defined as one that requires a change only in the techniques of the natural sciences, demanding little or nothing in the way of change in human values or ideas of morality.

After all, sustainability means running the global environment - Earth Inc. - like a corporation: with depreciation, amortization and maintenance accounts. In other words, keeping the asset whole, rather than undermining your natural capital.

All faith consists essentially in the recognition of a world of spiritual values behind, yet not apart from, the world of natural phenomena.

Adoption has been a part of my life and a part of my family, so it was how I wanted to start. It felt natural and right to me.

As Michigan's voice on the Senate Finance Committee and Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, I will continue working to make sure the next generation of advanced technologies and alternative fuel vehicles are made right here in America.

Misspelled Form

natural, bnatural, hnatural, jnatural, mnatural, natural, batural, hatural, jatural, matural, atural, nbatural, nhatural, njatural, nmatural, n atural, nqatural, nwatural, nsatural, nzatural, nqtural, nwtural, nstural, nztural, naqtural, nawtural, nastural, naztural, nartural, na5tural, na6tural, naytural, nagtural, narural, na5ural, na6ural, nayural, nagural, natrural, nat5ural, nat6ural, natyural, natgural, natyural, nat7ural, nat8ural, natiural, natjural, natyral, nat7ral, nat8ral, natiral, natjral, natuyral, natu7ral, natu8ral, natuiral, natujral, natueral, natu4ral, natu5ral, natutral, natufral, natueal, natu4al, natu5al, natutal, natufal, natureal, natur4al, natur5al, naturtal, naturfal, naturqal, naturwal, natursal, naturzal, naturql, naturwl, natursl, naturzl, naturaql, naturawl, naturasl, naturazl, naturakl, naturaol, naturapl, natura:l, naturak, naturao, naturap, natura:, naturalk, naturalo, naturalp, natural:.

Other Usage Examples

A nice, easy place for freedom of speech to be eroded is comics, because comics are a natural target whenever an election comes up.

As founder and co-chair of the upper Mississippi River Congressional task force, I have long sought to preserve the river's health and historical multiple uses, including as a natural waterway and a home to wildlife, for the benefit of future generations of Americans.

Although modesty is natural to man, it is not natural to children. Modesty only begins with the knowledge of evil.

As writers become more numerous, it is natural for readers to become more indolent whence must necessarily arise a desire of attaining knowledge with the greatest possible ease.

Agricultural practice served Darwin as the material basis for the elaboration of his theory of Evolution, which explained the natural causation of the adaptation we see in the structure of the organic world. That was a great advance in the knowledge of living nature.

As soon as the land of any country has all become private property, the landlords, like all other men, love to reap where they never sowed, and demand a rent even for its natural produce.

All a musician can do is to get closer to the sources of nature, and so feel that he is in communion with the natural laws.

As soon as I got out there I felt a strange relationship with the pitcher's mound. It was as if I'd been born out there. Pitching just felt like the most natural thing in the world. Striking out batters was easy.

A man's real life is that accorded to him in the thoughts of other men by reason of respect or natural love.

Any person seasoned with a just sense of the imperfections of natural reason, will fly to revealed truth with the greatest avidity.

Comments


Browse Dictionary