nation

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[na┬Ětion]

United States prohibitionist who raided saloons and destroyed bottles of liquor with a hatchet (1846 1911)

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A part, or division, of the people of the earth, distinguished from the rest by common descent, language, or institutions; a race; a stock.

Noun
the people who live in a nation or country; "a statement that sums up the nation''s mood"; "the news was announced to the nation"; "the whole country worshipped him"

Noun
a politically organized body of people under a single government; "the state has elected a new president"; "African nations"; "students who had come to the nation''s capitol"; "the country''s largest manufacturer"; "an industrialized land"

Noun
a federation of tribes (especially native American tribes); "the Shawnee nation"

Noun
United States prohibitionist who raided saloons and destroyed bottles of liquor with a hatchet (1846-1911)


n.
A part, or division, of the people of the earth, distinguished from the rest by common descent, language, or institutions; a race; a stock.

n.
The body of inhabitants of a country, united under an independent government of their own.

n.
Family; lineage.

n.
One of the divisions of university students in a classification according to nativity, formerly common in Europe.

n.
One of the four divisions (named from the parts of Scotland) in which students were classified according to their nativity.

n.
A great number; a great deal; -- by way of emphasis; as, a nation of herbs.


Nation

Na"tion , n. [F. nation, L. natio nation, race, orig., a being born, fr. natus, p.p. of nasci, to be born, for gnatus, gnaci, from the same root as E. kin. 'fb44. See Kin kindred, and cf. Cognate, Natal, Native.] 1. (Ethnol.) A part, or division, of the people of the earth, distinguished from the rest by common descent, language, or institutions; a race; a stock.
All nations, and kindreds, and people, and tongues.
2. The body of inhabitants of a country, united under an independent government of their own.
A nation is the unity of a people.
Praise the power that hath made and preserved us a nation.
3. Family; lineage. [Obs.] Chaucer. 4. (a) One of the divisions of university students in a classification according to nativity, formerly common in Europe. (b) (Scotch Universities) One of the four divisions (named from the parts of Scotland) in which students were classified according to their nativity. 5. A great number; a great deal; -- by way of emphasis; as, a nation of herbs. Sterne. Five nations. See under Five. -- Law of nations. See International law, under International, and Law. Syn. -- people; race. See People.

A part, or division, of the people of the earth, distinguished from the rest by common descent, language, or institutions; a race; a stock.

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Usage Examples

A moment comes, which comes but rarely in history, when we step out from the old to the new when an age ends and when the soul of a nation long suppressed finds utterance.

A good government may, indeed, redress the grievances of an injured people but a strong people can alone build up a great nation.

A nation devoid of art and artists cannot have a full existence.

A nation or civilization that continues to produce soft-minded men purchases its own spiritual death on the installment plan.

A man may devote himself to death and destruction to save a nation but no nation will devote itself to death and destruction to save mankind.

A liberal education... frees a man from the prison-house of his class, race, time, place, background, family and even his nation.

A Failure in this Duty did once involve our Nation in all the Horrors of Rebellion and Civil War.

Misspelled Form

nation, bnation, hnation, jnation, mnation, nation, bation, hation, jation, mation, ation, nbation, nhation, njation, nmation, n ation, nqation, nwation, nsation, nzation, nqtion, nwtion, nstion, nztion, naqtion, nawtion, nastion, naztion, nartion, na5tion, na6tion, naytion, nagtion, narion, na5ion, na6ion, nayion, nagion, natrion, nat5ion, nat6ion, natyion, natgion, natuion, nat8ion, nat9ion, natoion, natjion, natkion, natuon, nat8on, nat9on, natoon, natjon, natkon, natiuon, nati8on, nati9on, natioon, natijon, natikon, natiion, nati9on, nati0on, natipon, natilon, natiin, nati9n, nati0n, natipn, natiln, natioin, natio9n, natio0n, natiopn, natioln, natiobn, natiohn, natiojn, natiomn, natio n, natiob, natioh, natioj, natiom, natio , nationb, nationh, nationj, nationm, nation .

Other Usage Examples

A government is invigorated when each of us is willing to participate in shaping the future of this nation.

A nation that does not stand for its children does not stand for anything and will not stand tall in the future.

A battle lost or won is easily described, understood, and appreciated, but the moral growth of a great nation requires reflection, as well as observation, to appreciate it.

A marriage without conflicts is almost as inconceivable as a nation without crises.

A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual doom.

A civilized nation can have no enemies, and one cannot draw a line across a map, a line that doesn't even exist in nature and say that the ugly enemy lives on the one side, and good friends live on the other.

A nation is a society united by a delusion about its ancestry and by common hatred of its neighbours.

A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself. Forests are the lungs of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people.

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