money

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[Mon·ey]

Money is cash. You can have money in your pocket or money in the bank. People need money to buy things.

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A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a medium of exchange in financial transactions between citizens and with government; also, any number of such pieces; coin.

Noun
wealth reckoned in terms of money; "all his money is in real estate"

Noun
the most common medium of exchange; functions as legal tender; "we tried to collect the money he owed us"

Noun
the official currency issued by a government or national bank; "he changed his money into francs"


n.
A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a medium of exchange in financial transactions between citizens and with government; also, any number of such pieces; coin.

n.
Any written or stamped promise, certificate, or order, as a government note, a bank note, a certificate of deposit, etc., which is payable in standard coined money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and selling.

n.
In general, wealth; property; as, he has much money in land, or in stocks; to make, or lose, money.

v. t.
To supply with money.


Money

Mon"ey , n.; pl. Moneys . [OE. moneie, OF. moneie, F. monnaie, fr. L. moneta. See Mint place where coin is made, Mind, and cf. Moidore, Monetary.] 1. A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a medium of exchange in financial transactions between citizens and with government; also, any number of such pieces; coin.
To prevent such abuses, ... it has been found necessary ... to affix a public stamp upon certain quantities of such particular metals, as were in those countries commonly made use of to purchase goods. Hence the origin of coined money, and of those public offices called mints.
2. Any written or stamped promise, certificate, or order, as a government note, a bank note, a certificate of deposit, etc., which is payable in standard coined money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and selling. &hand; Whatever, among barbarous nations, is used as a medium of effecting exchanges of property, and in the terms of which values are reckoned, as sheep, wampum, copper rings, quills of salt or of gold dust, shovel blades, etc., is, in common language, called their money. 3. In general, wealth; property; as, he has much money in land, or in stocks; to make, or lose, money.
The love of money is a root of all kinds of evil.
Money bill (Legislation), a bill for raising revenue. -- Money broker, a broker who deals in different kinds of money; one who buys and sells bills of exchange; -- called also money changer. -- Money cowrie (Zo'94l.), any one of several species of Cypr'91a (esp. C. moneta) formerly much used as money by savage tribes. See Cowrie. -- Money of account, a denomination of value used in keeping accounts, for which there may, or may not, be an equivalent coin; e.g., the mill is a money of account in the United States, but not a coin. -- Money order, an order for the payment of money; specifically, a government order for the payment of money, issued at one post office as payable at another; -- called also postal money order. -- Money scrivener, a person who produces the loan of money to others. [Eng.] -- Money spider, Money spinner (Zo'94l.), a small spider; -- so called as being popularly supposed to indicate that the person upon whom it crawls will be fortunate in money matters. -- Money's worth, a fair or full equivalent for the money which is paid. -- A piece of money, a single coin. -- Ready money, money held ready for payment, or actually paid, at the time of a transaction; cash. -- To make money, to gain or acquire money or property; to make a profit in dealings.

Money

Mon"ey , v. t. To supply with money. [Obs.]

A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a medium of exchange in financial transactions between citizens and with government; also, any number of such pieces; coin.

To supply with money.

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Usage Examples

'Untitled' is a time machine that can transport you to 1992, an edgy moment when the art world was crumbling, money was scarce, and artists like Tiravanija were in the nascent stages of combining Happenings, performance art, John Cage, Joseph Beuys, and the do-it-yourself ethos of punk. Meanwhile, a new art world was coming into being.

A business that makes nothing but money is a poor business.

A firm, for instance, that does business in many countries of the world is driven to spend an enormous amount of time, labour, and money in providing for translation services.

A country like Belgium, or socialist countries in central Europe spend more money on art education than the United States, which is a really puzzling thought.

A corporation's primary goal is to make money. Government's primary role is to take a big chunk of that money and give it to others.

A fan sent me a letter and a $10 bill. It's a short letter - all she said was, 'Hey, since it's harder for you to go out these days without getting photographed, here $10 for a pizza.' I was like, 'Aww, she sent me money for a pizza so I could eat at home!'

A bank is a place that will lend you money if you can prove that you don't need it.

Misspelled Form

money, nmoney, jmoney, kmoney, ,money, money, noney, joney, koney, ,oney, oney, mnoney, mjoney, mkoney, m,oney, m oney, mioney, m9oney, m0oney, mponey, mloney, miney, m9ney, m0ney, mpney, mlney, moiney, mo9ney, mo0ney, mopney, molney, mobney, mohney, mojney, momney, mo ney, mobey, mohey, mojey, momey, mo ey, monbey, monhey, monjey, monmey, mon ey, monwey, mon3ey, mon4ey, monrey, monsey, mondey, monwy, mon3y, mon4y, monry, monsy, mondy, monewy, mone3y, mone4y, monery, monesy, monedy, monety, mone6y, mone7y, moneuy, monehy, monet, mone6, mone7, moneu, moneh, moneyt, money6, money7, moneyu, moneyh.

Other Usage Examples

A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you're talking about real money.

A fascist is one whose lust for money or power is combined with such an intensity of intolerance toward those of other races, parties, classes, religions, cultures, regions or nations as to make him ruthless in his use of deceit or violence to attain his ends.

A drunkard would not give money to sober people. He said they would only eat it, and buy clothes and send their children to school with it.

A drinker has a hole under his nose that all his money runs into.

A development deal is where they're giving you recording time and money to record, but not promising that they'll put an album out.

'Get a Job' is about all the rich kids we knew when we were younger, kids who never had jobs but always had money for partying or getting their hair done.

A company can spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on firewalls, intrusion detection systems and encryption and other security technologies, but if an attacker can call one trusted person within the company, and that person complies, and if the attacker gets in, then all that money spent on technology is essentially wasted.

A devastating commentary on the war in Iraq is that we have been unable to spend money on infrastructure.

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