minor

[mi┬Ěnor]

Something that's minor is considered of low importance a minor injury is not very serious, and a college student's minor subject is a secondary field of study. Likewise, the star constellation Ursa Major is a larger grouping than Ursa Minor.

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Inferior in bulk, degree, importance, etc.; less; smaller; of little account; as, minor divisions of a body.

Noun
a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they''re just kids"; "`tiddler'' is a British term for youngsters"

Adjective S.
limited in size or scope; "a small business"; "a newspaper with a modest circulation"; "small-scale plans"; "a pocket-size country"

Adjective
inferior in number or size or amount; "a minor share of the profits"; "Ursa Minor"

Adjective
lesser in scope or effect; "had minor differences"; "a minor disturbance"

Adjective
not of legal age; "minor children"

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Adjective
of a scale or mode; "the minor keys"; "in B flat minor"

Adjective
of your secondary field of academic concentration or specialization

Adjective
of lesser importance or stature or rank; "a minor poet"; "had a minor part in the play"; "a minor official"; "many of these hardy adventurers were minor noblemen"; "minor back roads"

Adjective
of lesser seriousness or danger; "suffered only minor injuries"; "some minor flooding"; "a minor tropical disturbance"

Adjective S.
warranting only temporal punishment; "venial sin"


a.
Inferior in bulk, degree, importance, etc.; less; smaller; of little account; as, minor divisions of a body.

a.
Less by a semitone in interval or difference of pitch; as, a minor third.

n.
A person of either sex who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded; an infant; in England and the United States, one under twenty-one years of age.

n.
The minor term, that is, the subject of the conclusion; also, the minor premise, that is, that premise which contains the minor term; in hypothetical syllogisms, the categorical premise. It is the second proposition of a regular syllogism, as in the following: Every act of injustice partakes of meanness; to take money from another by gaming is an act of injustice; therefore, the taking of money from another by gaming partakes of meanness.

n.
A Minorite; a Franciscan friar.


Minor

Mi"nor , a. [L., a comparative with no positive; akin to AS. min small, G. minder less, OHG. minniro, a., min, adv., Icel. minni, a., minnr, adv., Goth. minniza, a., mins, adv., Ir. & Gael. min small, tender, L. minuere to lessen, Gr. , Skr. mi to damage. Cf. Minish, Minister, Minus, Minute.] 1. Inferior in bulk, degree, importance, etc.; less; smaller; of little account; as, minor divisions of a body. 2. (Mus.) Less by a semitone in interval or difference of pitch; as, a minor third. Asia Minor (Geog.), the Lesser Asia; that part of Asia which lies between the Euxine, or Black Sea, on the north, and the Mediterranean on the south. -- Minor mode (Mus.), that mode, or scale, in which the third and sixth are minor, -- much used for mournful and solemn subjects. -- Minor orders (Eccl.), the rank of persons employed in ecclesiastical offices who are not in holy orders, as doorkeepers, acolytes, etc. -- Minor scale (Mus.) The form of the minor scale is various. The strictly correct form has the third and sixth minor, with a semitone between the seventh and eighth, which involves an augmented second interval, or three semitones, between the sixth and seventh, as, 6/F, 7/G♯, 8/A. But, for melodic purposes, both the sixth and the seventh are sometimes made major in the ascending, and minor in the descending, scale, thus: -- See Major. -- Minor term of syllogism (Logic), the subject of the conclusion.

Minor

Mi"nor , n. 1. A person of either sex who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded; an infant; in England and the United States, one under twenty-one years of age. &hand; In hereditary monarchies, the minority of a sovereign ends at an earlier age than of a subject. The minority of a sovereign of Great Britain ends upon the completion of the eighteenth year of his age. 2. (Logic) The minor term, that is, the subject of the conclusion; also, the minor premise, that is, that premise which contains the minor term; in hypothetical syllogisms, the categorical premise. It is the second proposition of a regular syllogism, as in the following: Every act of injustice partakes of meanness; to take money from another by gaming is an act of injustice; therefore, the taking of money from another by gaming partakes of meanness. 3. A Minorite; a Franciscan friar.

Inferior in bulk, degree, importance, etc.; less; smaller; of little account; as, minor divisions of a body.

A person of either sex who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded; an infant; in England and the United States, one under twenty-one years of age.

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Usage Examples

I'm drawn to furniture design as complete architecture on a minor scale.

When I was in my 20s it did occur to me that there was something perverted about an attitude that thought that killing somebody was a minor offence compared to kissing somebody.

'Blind Curve,' the book I'm working on now, sprang from a crazy incident that happened to me last year while on my book tour. I was pulled out of my car for a minor traffic violation - an incident that escalated into my being thrown into cuffs and told I was going to jail. Except in my story, the hero doesn't get off as easily as I did.

The point of my work is to show that culture and education aren't simply hobbies or minor influences.

Propelled by freedom of faith, gender equality and economic justice for all, India will become a modern nation. Minor blemishes cannot cloak the fact that India is becoming such a modern nation: no faith is in danger in our country, and the continuing commitment to gender equality is one of the great narratives of our times.

Once you agree upon the price you and your family must pay for success, it enables you to ignore the minor hurts, the opponent's pressure, and the temporary failures.

Misspelled Form

minor, nminor, jminor, kminor, ,minor, minor, ninor, jinor, kinor, ,inor, inor, mninor, mjinor, mkinor, m,inor, m inor, muinor, m8inor, m9inor, moinor, mjinor, mkinor, munor, m8nor, m9nor, monor, mjnor, mknor, miunor, mi8nor, mi9nor, mionor, mijnor, miknor, mibnor, mihnor, mijnor, mimnor, mi nor, mibor, mihor, mijor, mimor, mi or, minbor, minhor, minjor, minmor, min or, minior, min9or, min0or, minpor, minlor, minir, min9r, min0r, minpr, minlr, minoir, mino9r, mino0r, minopr, minolr, minoer, mino4r, mino5r, minotr, minofr, minoe, mino4, mino5, minot, minof, minore, minor4, minor5, minort, minorf.

Other Usage Examples

For a country to have a great writer is like having a second government. That is why no regime has ever loved great writers, only minor ones.

I don't get a sense of American pride. I just get a sense that everyone is here, battling the same thing - that around the world everybody's after the same thing, just some minor piece of happiness each day.

A sense of humor is a major defense against minor troubles.

Patience, n. A minor form of dispair, disguised as a virtue.

We're going to have more kids playing, and we're going to have a better chance of finding those players Minor sports in a community is for fun and recreation. For everyone.

It was difficult being a teacher and out of the closet in the '50s. By the time I retired, the English department was proud of having a gay poet of a certain minor fame. It was a very satisfactory change!

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