mind

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[Mind]

Your mind is where your thinking happens. If you've made up your mind, you've come to a decision.

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The intellectual or rational faculty in man; the understanding; the intellect; the power that conceives, judges, or reasons; also, the entire spiritual nature; the soul; -- often in distinction from the body.

Noun
that which is responsible for one''s thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason; "his mind wandered"; "I couldn''t get his words out of my head"

Noun
knowledge and intellectual ability; "he reads to improve his mind"; "he has a keen intellect"

Noun
attention; "don''t pay him any mind"

Noun
recall or remembrance; "it came to mind"

Noun
an opinion formed by judging something; "he was reluctant to make his judgment known"; "she changed her mind"

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Noun
your intention; what you intend to do; "he had in mind to see his old teacher"; "the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces"

Noun
an important intellectual; "the great minds of the 17th century"

Verb
keep in mind

Verb
be concerned with or about something or somebody

Verb
be on one''s guard; be cautious or wary about; be alert to; "Beware of telephone salesmen"

Verb
be offended or bothered by; take offense with, be bothered by; "I don''t mind your behavior"

Verb
be in charge of or deal with; "She takes care of all the necessary arrangements"

Verb
pay close attention to; give heed to; "Heed the advice of the old men"


v.
The intellectual or rational faculty in man; the understanding; the intellect; the power that conceives, judges, or reasons; also, the entire spiritual nature; the soul; -- often in distinction from the body.

v.
The state, at any given time, of the faculties of thinking, willing, choosing, and the like; psychical activity or state; as: (a) Opinion; judgment; belief.

v.
Choice; inclination; liking; intent; will.

v.
Courage; spirit.

v.
Memory; remembrance; recollection; as, to have or keep in mind, to call to mind, to put in mind, etc.

n.
To fix the mind or thoughts on; to regard with attention; to treat as of consequence; to consider; to heed; to mark; to note.

n.
To occupy one's self with; to employ one's self about; to attend to; as, to mind one's business.

n.
To obey; as, to mind parents; the dog minds his master.

n.
To have in mind; to purpose.

n.
To put in mind; to remind.

v. i.
To give attention or heed; to obey; as, the dog minds well.


Mind

Mind , n. [AS. mynd, gemynd; akin to OHG. minna memory, love, G. minne love, Dan. minde mind, memory, remembrance, consent, vote, Sw. minne memory, Icel. minni, Goth. gamunds, L. mens, mentis, mind, Gr. , Skr. manas mind, man to think. , . Cf. Comment, Man, Mean, v., 3d Mental, Mignonette, Minion, Mnemonic, Money.] 1. The intellectual or rational faculty in man; the understanding; the intellect; the power that conceives, judges, or reasons; also, the entire spiritual nature; the soul; -- often in distinction from the body.
By the mind of man we understand that in him which thinks, remembers, reasons, wills.
What we mean by mind is simply that which perceives, thinks, feels, wills, and desires.
Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind.
The mind shall banquet, though the body pine.
2. The state, at any given time, of the faculties of thinking, willing, choosing, and the like; psychical activity or state; as: (a) Opinion; judgment; belief.
A fool uttereth all his mind.
Being so hard to me that brought your mind, I fear she'll prove as hard to you in telling her mind.
(b) Choice; inclination; liking; intent; will.
If it be your minds, then let none go forth.
(c) Courage; spirit. Chapman. 3. Memory; remembrance; recollection; as, to have or keep in mind, to call to mind, to put in mind, etc. To have a mind ∨ great mind, to be inclined or strongly inclined in purpose; -- used with an infinitive. "Sir Roger de Coverly... told me that he had a great mind to see the new tragedy with me." Addison. -- To lose one's mind, to become insane, or imbecile. -- To make up one's mind, to come to an opinion or decision; to determine. -- To put in mind, to remind. "Regard us simply as putting you in mind of what you already know to be good policy." Jowett (Thucyd. ).

Mind

Mind , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Minded; p. pr. & vb. n. Minding.] [AS. myndian, gemynd'c6an to remember. See Mind, n.] 1. To fix the mind or thoughts on; to regard with attention; to treat as of consequence; to consider; to heed; to mark; to note. "Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate." Rom. xii. 16.
My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.
2. To occupy one's self with; to employ one's self about; to attend to; as, to mind one's business.
Bidding him be a good child, and mind his book.
3. To obey; as, to mind parents; the dog minds his master. 4. To have in mind; to purpose. Beaconsfield.
I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
5. To put in mind; to remind. [Archaic] M. Arnold.
He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things.
I do thee wrong to mind thee of it.
Never mind, do not regard it; it is of no consequence; no matter. Syn. -- To notice; mark; regard; obey. See Attend.

Mind

Mind, v. i. To give attention or heed; to obey; as, the dog minds well.

The intellectual or rational faculty in man; the understanding; the intellect; the power that conceives, judges, or reasons; also, the entire spiritual nature; the soul; -- often in distinction from the body.

To fix the mind or thoughts on; to regard with attention; to treat as of consequence; to consider; to heed; to mark; to note.

To give attention or heed; to obey; as, the dog minds well.

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Usage Examples

A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.

'Dreams From My Father' reveals more about Obama than is usually known about political leaders until after they're dead. Perhaps more than it intends, it shows his mind working, in real time, sentence by sentence, in what feels like a private audience with the reader.

'Tis education forms the common mind just as the twig is bent the tree's inclined.

A book is the only place in which you can examine a fragile thought without breaking it, or explore an explosive idea without fear it will go off in your face. It is one of the few havens remaining where a man's mind can get both provocation and privacy.

A big part of financial freedom is having your heart and mind free from worry about the what-ifs of life.

A house is not a home unless it contains food and fire for the mind as well as the body.

A house is no home unless it contain food and fire for the mind as well as for the body.

A comedian's body is funny as well as his mind being funny, his whole personage is funny.

Misspelled Form

mind, nmind, jmind, kmind, ,mind, mind, nind, jind, kind, ,ind, ind, mnind, mjind, mkind, m,ind, m ind, muind, m8ind, m9ind, moind, mjind, mkind, mund, m8nd, m9nd, mond, mjnd, mknd, miund, mi8nd, mi9nd, miond, mijnd, miknd, mibnd, mihnd, mijnd, mimnd, mi nd, mibd, mihd, mijd, mimd, mi d, minbd, minhd, minjd, minmd, min d, minsd, mined, minfd, minxd, mincd, mins, mine, minf, minx, minc, minds, minde, mindf, mindx, mindc.

Other Usage Examples

A great mind becomes a great fortune.

A man at work, making something which he feels will exist because he is working at it and wills it, is exercising the energies of his mind and soul as well as of his body. Memory and imagination help him as he works.

A fact must be assimilated with, or discriminated fromm, some other fact or facts, in order to be raised to the dignity of a truth, and made to convey the least knowledge to the mind.

A chief event of life is the day in which we have encountered a mind that startled us.

A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.

A decision once taken brings peace to a man's mind and eases his soul.

A lot of the high-level sports are really in your mind.

A judgment about life has no meaning except the truth of the one who speaks last, and the mind is at ease only at the moment when everyone is shouting at once and no one can hear a thing.

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