middle

[mid┬Ědle]

The middle of something is its center, or the point where the two ends are the same distance away. If you're in the middle of a 26.2 mile marathon, you've reached the halfway mark, and you've run 13.1 miles.

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Equally distant from the extreme either of a number of things or of one thing; mean; medial; as, the middle house in a row; a middle rank or station in life; flowers of middle summer; men of middle age.

Noun
the middle area of the human torso (usually in front); "young American women believe that a bare midriff is fashionable"

Noun
an intermediate part or section; "A whole is that which has beginning, middle, and end"- Aristotle

Noun
an area that is approximately central within some larger region; "it is in the center of town"; "they ran forward into the heart of the struggle"; "they were in the eye of the storm"

Noun
time between the beginning and the end of a temporal period; "the middle of the war"; "rain during the middle of April"

Verb
put in the middle

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Adjective
between an earlier and a later period of time; "in the middle years"; "in his middle thirties"

Adjective
of a stage in the development of a language or literature between earlier and later stages; "Middle English is the English language from about 1100 to 1500"; "Middle Gaelic"

Adjective S.
being neither at the beginning nor at the end in a series; "adolescence is an awkward in-between age"; "in a mediate position"; "the middle point on a line"


a.
Equally distant from the extreme either of a number of things or of one thing; mean; medial; as, the middle house in a row; a middle rank or station in life; flowers of middle summer; men of middle age.

a.
Intermediate; intervening.

a.
The point or part equally distant from the extremities or exterior limits, as of a line, a surface, or a solid; an intervening point or part in space, time, or order of series; the midst; central portion

a.
the waist.


Middle

Mid"dle , a. [OE. middel, AS. middel; akin to D. middel, OHG. muttil, G. mittel. . See Mid, a.] 1. Equally distant from the extreme either of a number of things or of one thing; mean; medial; as, the middle house in a row; a middle rank or station in life; flowers of middle summer; men of middle age. 2. Intermediate; intervening.
Will, seeking good, finds many middle ends.
&hand; Middle is sometimes used in the formation of selfexplaining compounds; as, middle-sized, middle-witted. Middle Ages, the period of time intervening between the decline of the Roman Empire and the revival of letters. Hallam regards it as beginning with the sixth and ending with the fifteenth century. -- Middle class, in England, people who have an intermediate position between the aristocracy and the artisan class. It includes professional men, bankers, merchants, and small landed proprietors
The middle-class electorate of Great Britain.
-- Middle distance. (Paint.) See Middle-ground. -- Middle English. See English, n., 2. -- Middle Kingdom, China. -- Middle oil (Chem.), that part of the distillate obtained from coal tar which passes over between 170° and 230° Centigrade; -- distinguished from the light, and the heavy or dead, oil. -- Middle passage, in the slave trade, that part of the Atlantic Ocean between Africa and the West Indies. -- Middle post. (Arch.) Same as King-post. -- Middle States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware; which, at the time of the formation of the Union, occupied a middle position between the Eastern States (or New England) and the Southern States. [U.S.] -- Middle term (Logic), that term of a syllogism with which the two extremes are separately compared, and by means of which they are brought together in the conclusion. Brande. -- Middle tint (Paint.), a subdued or neutral tint. Fairholt. -- Middle voice. (Gram.) See under Voice. -- Middle watch, the period from midnight to four A. M.; also, the men on watch during that time. Ham. Nav. Encyc. -- Middle weight, a pugilist, boxer, or wrestler classed as of medium weight, i. e., over 140 and not over 160 lbs., in distinction from those classed as light weights, heavy weights, etc.

Middle

Mid"dle , n. [AS. middel. See Middle, a.] The point or part equally distant from the extremities or exterior limits, as of a line, a surface, or a solid; an intervening point or part in space, time, or order of series; the midst; central portion; specif., the waist. Chaucer. "The middle of the land." Judg. ix. 37.
In this, as in most questions of state, there is a middle.
Syn. -- See Midst.

Equally distant from the extreme either of a number of things or of one thing; mean; medial; as, the middle house in a row; a middle rank or station in life; flowers of middle summer; men of middle age.

The point or part equally distant from the extremities or exterior limits, as of a line, a surface, or a solid; an intervening point or part in space, time, or order of series; the midst; central portion; specif., the waist.

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Usage Examples

As a precocious teen I dreamed of being Graham Greene. Well, as it turned out, I never wrote a great novel, sadly, and I never converted to Catholicism, happily, but I did do one thing he did. That is, in middle age I moved to a seaside town and got into a right barney with the local powers-that-be.

And we turned off and 30 miles south they're standing in the middle of our road blocking our way, stopped the car, got out, took us through the path in the woods, where the craft was on the ground.

Abraham Lincoln comes from nothing, has no education, no money, lives in the middle of nowhere on the frontier. And despite the fact that he suffers one tragedy and one setback after another, through sheer force of will, he becomes something extraordinary: not only the president but the person who almost single-handedly united the country.

And let me make this very clear - unlike President Obama, I will not raise taxes on the middle class. As president, I will protect the sanctity of life. I will honor the institution of marriage. And I will guarantee America's first liberty: the freedom of religion.

Always read something that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it.

And in terms of their crown jewel legislative achievement: who knew that when asked, 'will government impose a new federal mandate requiring middle class Americans to buy health insurance whether they can afford it or not?' The answer would be 'Yes we can!'

Another challenge? Getting up at 6:30 in the morning to go act. It's not fun acting that early in the morning or acting at 4 A.M in the middle of the night or in the morning when you're really tired. That's a challenge. What a luxurious problem to have.

Misspelled Form

middle, nmiddle, jmiddle, kmiddle, ,middle, middle, niddle, jiddle, kiddle, ,iddle, iddle, mniddle, mjiddle, mkiddle, m,iddle, m iddle, muiddle, m8iddle, m9iddle, moiddle, mjiddle, mkiddle, muddle, m8ddle, m9ddle, moddle, mjddle, mkddle, miuddle, mi8ddle, mi9ddle, mioddle, mijddle, mikddle, misddle, mieddle, mifddle, mixddle, micddle, misdle, miedle, mifdle, mixdle, micdle, midsdle, midedle, midfdle, midxdle, midcdle, midsdle, midedle, midfdle, midxdle, midcdle, midsle, midele, midfle, midxle, midcle, middsle, middele, middfle, middxle, middcle, middkle, middole, middple, midd:le, middke, middoe, middpe, midd:e, middlke, middloe, middlpe, middl:e, middlwe, middl3e, middl4e, middlre, middlse, middlde, middlw, middl3, middl4, middlr, middls, middld, middlew, middle3, middle4, middler, middles, middled.

Other Usage Examples

A story should have a beginning, a middle and an end, but not necessarily in that order.

All studio movies are the middle of the Bell curve. The only way to do something is to do it yourself. And the only way to do that is to not take any money from anyone or take as little money as possible from anyone and that's it.

Above all, it is not decency or goodness of gentleness that impresses the Middle East, but strength.

Another thing that freaks me out is time. Time is like a book. You have a beginning, a middle and an end. It's just a cycle.

A faction willing to take the risks of making war on the ossified status quo in the Middle East can be described as many things, but not as conservative.

A psychologist once told me that for a boy being in the middle of a conflict between two women is the worst possible situation. There's always a desire to please each one.

Ageism works in both directions. As a teenager in the public eye, people would talk condescendingly to me. When you get older there's this feeling that you have to start carving up your face and body. Right now I'm in the middle ground - I think women in their thirties are taken seriously.

As a kid, I was always mad - just noticing the women at Thanksgiving, running around the kitchen, while the men were watching football. For one, I don't want to cook, and for two, I hate football. I was stuck in the middle.

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