mantle

[Man┬Ětle]

United States baseball player (1931 1997)

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A loose garment to be worn over other garments; an enveloping robe; a cloak. Hence, figuratively, a covering or concealing envelope.

Noun
a sleeveless garment like a cloak but shorter

Noun
hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)

Noun
shelf that projects from wall above fireplace; "in England they call a mantel a chimneypiece"

Noun
(zoology) a protective layer of epidermis in mollusks or brachiopods that secretes a substance forming the shell

Noun
the cloak as a symbol of authority; "place the mantle of authority on younger shoulders"

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Noun
anything that covers; "there was a blanket of snow"

Noun
the layer of the earth between the crust and the core

Noun
United States baseball player (1931-1997)

Verb
cover like a mantle; "The ivy mantles the building"

Verb
spread over a surface, like a mantle


n.
A loose garment to be worn over other garments; an enveloping robe; a cloak. Hence, figuratively, a covering or concealing envelope.

n.
Same as Mantling.

n.
The external fold, or folds, of the soft, exterior membrane of the body of a mollusk. It usually forms a cavity inclosing the gills. See Illusts. of Buccinum, and Byssus.

n.
Any free, outer membrane.

n.
The back of a bird together with the folded wings.

n.
A mantel. See Mantel.

n.
The outer wall and casing of a blast furnace, above the hearth.

n.
A penstock for a water wheel.

v. t.
To cover or envelop, as with a mantle; to cloak; to hide; to disguise.

v. i.
To unfold and spread out the wings, like a mantle; -- said of hawks. Also used figuratively.

v. i.
To spread out; -- said of wings.

v. i.
To spread over the surface as a covering; to overspread; as, the scum mantled on the pool.

v. i.
To gather, assume, or take on, a covering, as froth, scum, etc.


Mantle

Man"tle , n. [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.] 1. A loose garment to be worn over other garments; an enveloping robe; a cloak. Hence, figuratively, a covering or concealing envelope.
[The] children are clothed with mantles of satin.
The green mantle of the standing pool.
Now Nature hangs her mantle green On every blooming tree.
2. (Her.) Same as Mantling. 3. (Zo'94l.) (a) The external fold, or folds, of the soft, exterior membrane of the body of a mollusk. It usually forms a cavity inclosing the gills. See Illusts. of Buccinum, and Byssus. (b) Any free, outer membrane. (c) The back of a bird together with the folded wings. 4. (Arch.) A mantel. See Mantel. 5. The outer wall and casing of a blast furnace, above the hearth. Raymond. 6. (Hydraulic Engin.) A penstock for a water wheel.

Mantle

Man"tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mantled ; p. pr. & vb. n. Mantling .] To cover or envelop, as with a mantle; to cloak; to hide; to disguise. Shak.

Mantle

Man"tle, v. i. 1. To unfold and spread out the wings, like a mantle; -- said of hawks. Also used figuratively.
Ne is there hawk which mantleth on her perch.
Or tend his sparhawk mantling in her mew.
My frail fancy fed with full delight. Doth bathe in bliss, and mantleth most at ease.
2. To spread out; -- said of wings.
The swan, with arched neck Between her white wings mantling proudly, rows.
3. To spread over the surface as a covering; to overspread; as, the scum mantled on the pool.
Though mantled in her cheek the blood.
4. To gather, assume, or take on, a covering, as froth, scum, etc.
There is a sort of men whose visages Do cream and mantle like a standing pond.
Nor bowl of wassail mantle warm.

A loose garment to be worn over other garments; an enveloping robe; a cloak. Hence, figuratively, a covering or concealing envelope.

To cover or envelop, as with a mantle; to cloak; to hide; to disguise.

To unfold and spread out the wings, like a mantle; -- said of hawks. Also used figuratively.

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Usage Examples

Through no divine design or cosmic plan, we have inherited the mantle of life's caretaker on the earth, the only home we have ever known.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

Woman is the salvation or the destruction of the family. She carries its destiny in the folds of her mantle.

I know that some endeavor to throw the mantle of romance over the subject and treat woman like some ideal existence, not liable to the ills of life. Let those deal in fancy who have nothing better to deal in we have to do with sober, sad realities, with stubborn facts.

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