mail

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[Mail]

Mail is anything that's delivered to your mail box or post office box letters, bills, packages, magazines, or anything else that's sent through the postal service. Email is the internet's version of mail.

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A spot.

Noun
(Middle Ages) flexible armor made of interlinked metal rings

Noun
a conveyance that transports mail

Noun
the system whereby messages are transmitted via the post office; "the mail handles billions of items every day"; "he works for the United States mail service"; "in England they call mail `the post''"

Noun
the bags of letters and packages that are transported by the postal service

Noun
any particular collection of letters or packages that is delivered; "your mail is on the table"; "is there any post for me?"; "she was opening her post"

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Verb
cause to be directed or transmitted to another place; "send me your latest results"; "I''ll mail you the paper when it''s written"

Verb
send via the postal service; "I''ll mail you the check tomorrow"


n.
A spot.

n.
A small piece of money; especially, an English silver half-penny of the time of Henry V.

n.
Rent; tribute.

n.
A flexible fabric made of metal rings interlinked. It was used especially for defensive armor.

n.
Hence generally, armor, or any defensive covering.

n.
A contrivance of interlinked rings, for rubbing off the loose hemp on lines and white cordage.

n.
Any hard protective covering of an animal, as the scales and plates of reptiles, shell of a lobster, etc.

v. t.
To arm with mail.

v. t.
To pinion.

n.
A bag; a wallet.

n.
The bag or bags with the letters, papers, papers, or other matter contained therein, conveyed under public authority from one post office to another; the whole system of appliances used by government in the conveyance and delivery of mail matter.

n.
That which comes in the mail; letters, etc., received through the post office.

n.
A trunk, box, or bag, in which clothing, etc., may be carried.

v. t.
To deliver into the custody of the postoffice officials, or place in a government letter box, for transmission by mail; to post; as, to mail a letter.


Mail

Mail , n. A spot. [Obs.]

Mail

Mail, n. [F. maille, OF. also maaille, LL. medalia. See Medal.] 1. A small piece of money; especially, an English silver half-penny of the time of Henry V. [Obs.] [Written also maile, and maille.] 2. Rent; tribute. [Obs., except in certain compounds and phrases, as blackmail, mails and duties, etc.] Mail and duties (Scots Law), the rents of an estate, in whatever form paid.

Mail

Mail, n. [OE. maile, maille, F. maille a ring of mail, mesh, network, a coat of mail, fr. L. macula spot, a mesh of a net. Cf. Macle, Macula, Mascle.] 1. A flexible fabric made of metal rings interlinked. It was used especially for defensive armor. Chaucer. Chain mail, Coat of mail. See under Chain, and Coat. 2. Hence generally, armor, or any defensive covering. 3. (Naut.) A contrivance of interlinked rings, for rubbing off the loose hemp on lines and white cordage. 4. (Zo'94l.) Any hard protective covering of an animal, as the scales and plates of reptiles, shell of a lobster, etc.
We . . . strip the lobster of his scarlet mail.

Mail

Mail, v. t. 1. To arm with mail. 2. To pinion. [Obs.]

Mail

Mail, n. [OE. male bag, OF. male, F. malle bag, trunk, mail, OHG. malaha, malha, wallet; akin to D. maal, male; cf. Gael. & Ir. mala, Gr. hide, skin.] 1. A bag; a wallet. [Obs.] Chaucer. 2. The bag or bags with the letters, papers, papers, or other matter contained therein, conveyed under public authority from one post office to another; the whole system of appliances used by government in the conveyance and delivery of mail matter.
There is a mail come in to-day, with letters dated Hague.
3. That which comes in the mail; letters, etc., received through the post office. 4. A trunk, box, or bag, in which clothing, etc., may be carried. [Obs.] Sir W. Scott. Mail bag, a bag in which mailed matter is conveyed under public authority. -- Mail boat, a boat that carries the mail. -- Mail catcher, an iron rod, or other contrivance, attached to a railroad car for catching a mail bag while the train is in motion. -- Mail guard, an officer whose duty it is to guard the public mails. [Eng.] -- Mail train, a railroad train carrying the mail.

Mail

Mail, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mailed ; p. pr. & vb. n. Mailing.] To deliver into the custody of the postoffice officials, or place in a government letter box, for transmission by mail; to post; as, to mail a letter. [U. S.] &hand; In the United States to mail and to post are both in common use; as, to mail or post a letter. In England post is the commoner usage.

A spot.

A small piece of money; especially, an English silver half-penny of the time of Henry V.

A flexible fabric made of metal rings interlinked. It was used especially for defensive armor.

To arm with mail.

A bag; a wallet.

To deliver into the custody of the postoffice officials, or place in a government letter box, for transmission by mail; to post; as, to mail a letter.

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Usage Examples

I'm so happy to have been a part of that process and I would go straight back into the desert in a ton of chain mail for Ridley any day of the week. He's an amazing director and I can't wait to see the long version.

Always write angry letters to your enemies. Never mail them.

Unlike then, the mail stream of today has diminished by such things as e-mails and faxes and cell phones and text messages, largely electronic means of communication that replace mail.

I mean, I get letters in the mail because I had a heart defect when I was one, I had surgeries and stuff. And so you get these letters in the mail that just, they are crazy, they are just like, yes, well our son is dealing with the same thing and we saw you on TV and I mean it is such a cool thing to inspire and kind of give hope.

We grew up founding our dreams on the infinite promise of American advertising. I still believe that one can learn to play the piano by mail and that mud will give you a perfect complexion.

Although I get so much fan mail from Great Britain, tell me, am I more famous there than Michael Madsen?

Some very famous directors have started in the mail room, which is just getting inside the studio, getting to know people, getting to know the routine.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

Mail your packages early so the post office can lose them in time for Christmas.

I hope all of you are going to fill out your census form when it comes in the mail next month. If you don't return the form the area you live in might get less government money and you wouldn't want that to happen, would you.

Some of the best fan mail I get are from our men and women in the military and intelligence communities. They say, 'Boy you do your homework, this is exactly how we're doing it.'

Learning music by reading about it is like making love by mail.

It seems a long time since the morning mail could be called correspondence.

I was one of the first authors to have an active website. I'm totally obsessed with technology. I'm always looking for ways to connect with my readers. I answer all my fan mail.

That's my dream job, to be able to mail songs out to people who want to hear them. Paste my face on them and not travel all over the world trying to sell them.

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