load

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[Load]

A load is a bundle of stuff that has to be carried. You might spend your days hauling loads of hay into a barn and your evenings dragging loads of dirty clothes into the laundry room.

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A burden; that which is laid on or put in anything for conveyance; that which is borne or sustained; a weight; as, a heavy load.

Noun
goods carried by a large vehicle

Noun
weight to be borne or conveyed

Noun
electrical device to which electrical power is delivered

Noun
the front part of a guided missile or rocket or torpedo that carries the nuclear or explosive charge or the chemical or biological agents

Noun
an onerous or difficult concern; "the burden of responsibility"; "that''s a load off my mind"

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Noun
a deposit of valuable ore occurring within definite boundaries separating it from surrounding rocks

Noun
the power output of a generator or power plant

Noun
an amount of alcohol sufficient to intoxicate; "he got a load on and started a brawl"

Noun
a quantity that can be processed or transported at one time; "the system broke down under excessive loads"

Verb
fill or place a load on; "load a car"; "load the truck with hay"

Verb
provide with munition; "He loaded his gun carefully"

Verb
put (something) on a structure or conveyance; "load the bags onto the trucks"


v.
A burden; that which is laid on or put in anything for conveyance; that which is borne or sustained; a weight; as, a heavy load.

v.
The quantity which can be carried or drawn in some specified way; the contents of a cart, barrow, or vessel; that which will constitute a cargo; lading.

v.
That which burdens, oppresses, or grieves the mind or spirits; as, a load of care.

v.
A particular measure for certain articles, being as much as may be carried at one time by the conveyance commonly used for the article measured; as, a load of wood; a load of hay; specifically, five quarters.

v.
The charge of a firearm; as, a load of powder.

v.
Weight or violence of blows.

v.
The work done by a steam engine or other prime mover when working.

v. t.
To lay a load or burden on or in, as on a horse or in a cart; to charge with a load, as a gun; to furnish with a lading or cargo, as a ship; hence, to add weight to, so as to oppress or embarrass; to heap upon.

v. t.
To adulterate or drug; as, to load wine.

v. t.
To magnetize.


Load

Load , n. [OE. lode load, way; properly the same word as lode, but confused with lade, load, v. See Lade, Lead, v., Lode.] 1. A burden; that which is laid on or put in anything for conveyance; that which is borne or sustained; a weight; as, a heavy load.
He might such a load To town with his ass carry.
2. The quantity which can be carried or drawn in some specified way; the contents of a cart, barrow, or vessel; that which will constitute a cargo; lading. 3. That which burdens, oppresses, or grieves the mind or spirits; as, a load of care. " A . . . load of guilt." Ray. " Our life's a load." Dryden. 4. A particular measure for certain articles, being as much as may be carried at one time by the conveyance commonly used for the article measured; as, a load of wood; a load of hay; specifically, five quarters. 5. The charge of a firearm; as, a load of powder. 6. Weight or violence of blows. [Obs.] Milton. 7. (Mach.) The work done by a steam engine or other prime mover when working. Load line, ∨ Load water line (Naut.), the line on the outside of a vessel indicating the depth to which it sinks in the water when loaded. Syn. -- Burden; lading; weight; cargo. See Burden.

Load

Load, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Loaded; p. pr. & vb. n. Loading. Loaden is obsolete, and laden belongs to lade.] 1. To lay a load or burden on or in, as on a horse or in a cart; to charge with a load, as a gun; to furnish with a lading or cargo, as a ship; hence, to add weight to, so as to oppress or embarrass; to heap upon.
I strive all in vain to load the cart.
I have loaden me with many spoils.
Those honors deep and broad, wherewith Your majesty loads our house.
2. To adulterate or drug; as, to load wine. [Cant] 3. To magnetize.[Obs.] Prior. Loaded dice, dice with one side made heavier than the others, so that the number on the opposite side will come up oftenest.

A burden; that which is laid on or put in anything for conveyance; that which is borne or sustained; a weight; as, a heavy load.

To lay a load or burden on or in, as on a horse or in a cart; to charge with a load, as a gun; to furnish with a lading or cargo, as a ship; hence, to add weight to, so as to oppress or embarrass; to heap upon.

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Usage Examples

We tend to think of age only in time, but I don't think it has much to do with time at all there's a whole load of other things. I've met 16-year-olds who are old and 90-year-olds who are young.

I don't think I could play a character that I couldn't relate to somehow. I'm not unfamiliar with frustration, anger, shame, helplessness and a load of other emotions that make up our psycho-soup. I try to focus on that frustration, that sense of unfairness, and multiply it.

My second play, The Birthday Party, I wrote in 1958 - or 1957. It was totally destroyed by the critics of the day, who called it an absolute load of rubbish.

Every summer my husband and I pack our suitcases, load our kids into the car, and drive from tense, crowded New York City to my family's cottage in Maine. It's on an island, with stretches of sea and sandy beaches, rocky coasts, and pine trees. We barbecue, swim, lie around, and try to do nothing.

My dad's got a brilliant eye for scripts 'cos he's a literary agent. He and my agent read a load of scripts and filter them.

I can design a collection in a day and I always do, cause I've always got a load of Italians on my back, moaning that it's late.

The whole 'American Idol' way of looking at things is the antithesis of what I grew up with. There are a whole lot of kids wanting to be famous now, whereas if I'd even mentioned that word to one of my teachers, I would have got into a whole load of trouble.

Misspelled Form

load, kload, oload, pload, :load, koad, ooad, poad, :oad, lkoad, looad, lpoad, l:oad, lioad, l9oad, l0oad, lpoad, lload, liad, l9ad, l0ad, lpad, llad, loiad, lo9ad, lo0ad, lopad, lolad, loqad, lowad, losad, lozad, loqd, lowd, losd, lozd, loaqd, loawd, loasd, loazd, loasd, loaed, loafd, loaxd, loacd, loas, loae, loaf, loax, loac, loads, loade, loadf, loadx, loadc.

Other Usage Examples

We would load up the yellow Cutlass Supreme station wagon and pick blackberries during blackberry season or spring onions during spring onion season. For us, food was part of the fabric of our day.

If you go away on location for three months and your wife stays at home, you've made a whole new load of friends and she's made a whole new load of friends and you get home and you're kind of strangers.

Nobody has time to keep trying on a load of things in the morning like a teenager.

Well, he doesn't make me laugh. I think I've got a fair sense of humour but I can't really see it in him. I've listened to his show on the radio on a Saturday morning, and that's a load of mince as well.

The lessons from the peace process are clear whatever life throws at us, our individual responses will be all the stronger for working together and sharing the load.

Sympathy is two hearts tugging at one load.

People love talking about when they were young and heard Honky Tonk Women for the first time. It's quite a heavy load to carry on your shoulders, the memories of so many people.

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