language

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[LanĀ·guage]

A language is a system of words and grammar used by a group of people. When we write and speak, we're using language.

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Any means of conveying or communicating ideas; specifically, human speech; the expression of ideas by the voice; sounds, expressive of thought, articulated by the organs of the throat and mouth.

Noun
the mental faculty or power of vocal communication; "language sets homo sapiens apart from all other animals"

Noun
the cognitive processes involved in producing and understanding linguistic communication; "he didn''t have the language to express his feelings"

Noun
a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it

Noun
a system of words used in a particular discipline; "legal terminology"; "the language of sociology"

Noun
the text of a popular song or musical-comedy number; "his compositions always started with the lyrics"; "he wrote both words and music"; "the song uses colloquial language"

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Noun
(language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"


n.
Any means of conveying or communicating ideas; specifically, human speech; the expression of ideas by the voice; sounds, expressive of thought, articulated by the organs of the throat and mouth.

n.
The expression of ideas by writing, or any other instrumentality.

n.
The forms of speech, or the methods of expressing ideas, peculiar to a particular nation.

n.
The characteristic mode of arranging words, peculiar to an individual speaker or writer; manner of expression; style.

n.
The inarticulate sounds by which animals inferior to man express their feelings or their wants.

n.
The suggestion, by objects, actions, or conditions, of ideas associated therewith; as, the language of flowers.

n.
The vocabulary and phraseology belonging to an art or department of knowledge; as, medical language; the language of chemistry or theology.

n.
A race, as distinguished by its speech.

v. t.
To communicate by language; to express in language.


Language

Lan"guage , n. [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.] 1. Any means of conveying or communicating ideas; specifically, human speech; the expression of ideas by the voice; sounds, expressive of thought, articulated by the organs of the throat and mouth. &hand; Language consists in the oral utterance of sounds which usage has made the representatives of ideas. When two or more persons customarily annex the same sounds to the same ideas, the expression of these sounds by one person communicates his ideas to another. This is the primary sense of language, the use of which is to communicate the thoughts of one person to another through the organs of hearing. Articulate sounds are represented to the eye by letters, marks, or characters, which form words. 2. The expression of ideas by writing, or any other instrumentality. 3. The forms of speech, or the methods of expressing ideas, peculiar to a particular nation. 4. The characteristic mode of arranging words, peculiar to an individual speaker or writer; manner of expression; style.
Others for language all their care express.
5. The inarticulate sounds by which animals inferior to man express their feelings or their wants. 6. The suggestion, by objects, actions, or conditions, of ideas associated therewith; as, the language of flowers.
There was . . . language in their very gesture.
7. The vocabulary and phraseology belonging to an art or department of knowledge; as, medical language; the language of chemistry or theology. 8. A race, as distinguished by its speech. [R.]
All the people, the nations, and the languages, fell down and worshiped the golden image.
Language master, a teacher of languages.[Obs.] Syn. -- Speech; tongue; idiom; dialect; phraseology; diction; discourse; conversation; talk. -- Language, Speech, Tongue, Idiom, Dialect. Language is generic, denoting, in its most extended use, any mode of conveying ideas; speech is the language of articulate sounds; tongue is the Anglo-Saxon tern for language, esp. for spoken language; as, the English tongue. Idiom denotes the forms of construction peculiar to a particular language; dialects are varieties if expression which spring up in different parts of a country among people speaking substantially the same language.

Language

Lan"guage, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Languaged ; p. pr. & vb. n. Languaging .] To communicate by language; to express in language.
Others were languaged in such doubtful expressions that they have a double sense.

Any means of conveying or communicating ideas; specifically, human speech; the expression of ideas by the voice; sounds, expressive of thought, articulated by the organs of the throat and mouth.

To communicate by language; to express in language.

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Usage Examples

An art whose medium is language will always show a high degree of critical creativeness, for speech is itself a critique of life: it names, it characterizes, it passes judgment, in that it creates.

A special kind of beauty exists which is born in language, of language, and for language.

'Let God be true but every man a liar' is the language of true faith.

And poets, in my view, and I think the view of most people, do speak God's language - it's better, it's finer, it's language on a higher plane than ordinary people speak in their daily lives.

After learning the language and culture of the Chinese people, these Jesuits began to establish contacts with the young intellectuals of the country.

Also, they don't understand - writing is language. The use of language. The language to create image, the language to create drama. It requires a skill of learning how to use language.

An important aspect of the current situation is the strong social reaction against suggestions that the home language of African American children be used in the first steps of learning to read and write.

A poet is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with language.

An artist must possess Nature. He must identify himself with her rhythm, by efforts that will prepare the mastery which will later enable him to express himself in his own language.

Misspelled Form

language, klanguage, olanguage, planguage, :language, kanguage, oanguage, panguage, :anguage, lkanguage, loanguage, lpanguage, l:anguage, lqanguage, lwanguage, lsanguage, lzanguage, lqnguage, lwnguage, lsnguage, lznguage, laqnguage, lawnguage, lasnguage, laznguage, labnguage, lahnguage, lajnguage, lamnguage, la nguage, labguage, lahguage, lajguage, lamguage, la guage, lanbguage, lanhguage, lanjguage, lanmguage, lan guage, lanfguage, lantguage, lanyguage, lanhguage, lanbguage, lanvguage, lanfuage, lantuage, lanyuage, lanhuage, lanbuage, lanvuage, langfuage, langtuage, langyuage, langhuage, langbuage, langvuage, langyuage, lang7uage, lang8uage, langiuage, langjuage, langyage, lang7age, lang8age, langiage, langjage, languyage, langu7age, langu8age, languiage, langujage, languqage, languwage, langusage, languzage, languqge, languwge, langusge, languzge, languaqge, languawge, languasge, languazge, languafge, languatge, languayge, languahge, languabge, languavge, languafe, languate, languaye, languahe, languabe, languave, languagfe, languagte, languagye, languaghe, languagbe, languagve, languagwe, languag3e, languag4e, languagre, languagse, languagde, languagw, languag3, languag4, languagr, languags, languagd, languagew, language3, language4, languager, languages, languaged.

Other Usage Examples

Art works because it appeals to certain faculties of the mind. Music depends on details of the auditory system, painting and sculpture on the visual system. Poetry and literature depend on language.

And I have to work so hard at talking positively to myself. If I don't, it's just real hard to get through the day, and I'll get really down, and just want to cry. My whole body language changes. I get more slumped over.

All human language draws its nature and value from the fact that it both comes from the Word of God and is chosen by God to manifest himself. But this relationship is secret and incomprehensible, beyond the bounds of reason and analysis.

All the different nations in the world, despite their differences of appearance and religion and language and way of life, still have one thing in common, and that is what's inside of all of us. If we X-rayed the insides of different human beings, we wouldn't be able to tell from those X-rays what the person's language or background or race is.

Arabs respect only the language of force.

Anthropologists are a connecting link between poets and scientists though their field-work among primitive peoples has often made them forget the language of science.

A warm smile is the universal language of kindness.

America's strength is not our diversity our strength is our ability to unite people of different backgrounds around common principles. A common language is necessary to reach that goal.

As societies grow decadent, the language grows decadent, too. Words are used to disguise, not to illuminate, action: you liberate a city by destroying it. Words are to confuse, so that at election time people will solemnly vote against their own interests.

And I believe that public broadcasting has an important trust with the American people, it's an intimate medium of television, and that we can do reading and language development for young children without getting into human sexuality.

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