knowledge

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[knowl·edge]

Why do you go to school? For knowledge, of course. To have knowledge means to know or be aware of things.

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The act or state of knowing; clear perception of fact, truth, or duty; certain apprehension; familiar cognizance; cognition.

Noun
the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning


v. i.
The act or state of knowing; clear perception of fact, truth, or duty; certain apprehension; familiar cognizance; cognition.

v. i.
That which is or may be known; the object of an act of knowing; a cognition; -- chiefly used in the plural.

v. i.
That which is gained and preserved by knowing; instruction; acquaintance; enlightenment; learning; scholarship; erudition.

v. i.
That familiarity which is gained by actual experience; practical skill; as, a knowledge of life.

v. i.
Scope of information; cognizance; notice; as, it has not come to my knowledge.

v. i.
Sexual intercourse; -- usually preceded by carnal; as, carnal knowledge.

v. t.
To acknowledge.


Knowledge

Knowl"edge , n. [OE. knowlage, knowlege, knowleche, knawleche. The last part is the Icel. suffix -leikr, forming abstract nouns, orig. the same as Icel. leikr game, play, sport, akin to AS. l'bec, Goth. laiks dance. See Know, and cf. Lake, v. i., Lark a frolic.] 1. The act or state of knowing; clear perception of fact, truth, or duty; certain apprehension; familiar cognizance; cognition.
Knowledge, which is the highest degree of the speculative faculties, consists in the perception of the truth of affirmative or negative propositions.
2. That which is or may be known; the object of an act of knowing; a cognition; -- chiefly used in the plural.
There is a great difference in the delivery of the mathematics, which are the most abstracted of knowledges.
Knowledges is a term in frequent use by Bacon, and, though now obsolete, should be revived, as without it we are compelled to borrow "cognitions" to express its import.
To use a word of Bacon's, now unfortunately obsolete, we must determine the relative value of knowledges.
3. That which is gained and preserved by knowing; instruction; acquaintance; enlightenment; learning; scholarship; erudition.
Knowledge puffeth up, but charity edifieth.
Ignorance is the curse of God; - Knowledge, the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.
4. That familiarity which is gained by actual experience; practical skill; as, a knowledge of life.
Shipmen that had knowledge of the sea.
5. Scope of information; cognizance; notice; as, it has not come to my knowledge.
Why have I found grace in thine eyes, that thou shouldst take knowledge of me?
6. Sexual intercourse; -- usually preceded by carnal; as, carnal knowledge. Syn. -- See Wisdom.

Knowledge

Knowl"edge, v. t. To acknowledge. [Obs.] "Sinners which knowledge their sins." Tyndale.

The act or state of knowing; clear perception of fact, truth, or duty; certain apprehension; familiar cognizance; cognition.

To acknowledge.

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Usage Examples

A belief in hell and the knowledge that every ambition is doomed to frustration at the hands of a skeleton have never prevented the majority of human beings from behaving as though death were no more than an unfounded rumor.

A healthy vision of the future is not possible without an accurate knowledge of the past.

A good decision is based on knowledge and not on numbers.

A lawyer without history or literature is a mechanic, a mere working mason if he possesses some knowledge of these, he may venture to call himself an architect.

A little knowledge that acts is worth infinitely more than much knowledge that is idle.

A civilization is a heritage of beliefs, customs, and knowledge slowly accumulated in the course of centuries, elements difficult at times to justify by logic, but justifying themselves as paths when they lead somewhere, since they open up for man his inner distance.

Misspelled Form

knowledge, jknowledge, iknowledge, oknowledge, lknowledge, mknowledge, jnowledge, inowledge, onowledge, lnowledge, mnowledge, kjnowledge, kinowledge, konowledge, klnowledge, kmnowledge, kbnowledge, khnowledge, kjnowledge, kmnowledge, k nowledge, kbowledge, khowledge, kjowledge, kmowledge, k owledge, knbowledge, knhowledge, knjowledge, knmowledge, kn owledge, kniowledge, kn9owledge, kn0owledge, knpowledge, knlowledge, kniwledge, kn9wledge, kn0wledge, knpwledge, knlwledge, knoiwledge, kno9wledge, kno0wledge, knopwledge, knolwledge, knoqwledge, kno2wledge, kno3wledge, knoewledge, knoawledge, knoswledge, knoqledge, kno2ledge, kno3ledge, knoeledge, knoaledge, knosledge, knowqledge, know2ledge, know3ledge, knoweledge, knowaledge, knowsledge, knowkledge, knowoledge, knowpledge, know:ledge, knowkedge, knowoedge, knowpedge, know:edge, knowlkedge, knowloedge, knowlpedge, knowl:edge, knowlwedge, knowl3edge, knowl4edge, knowlredge, knowlsedge, knowldedge, knowlwdge, knowl3dge, knowl4dge, knowlrdge, knowlsdge, knowlddge, knowlewdge, knowle3dge, knowle4dge, knowlerdge, knowlesdge, knowleddge, knowlesdge, knowleedge, knowlefdge, knowlexdge, knowlecdge, knowlesge, knowleege, knowlefge, knowlexge, knowlecge, knowledsge, knowledege, knowledfge, knowledxge, knowledcge, knowledfge, knowledtge, knowledyge, knowledhge, knowledbge, knowledvge, knowledfe, knowledte, knowledye, knowledhe, knowledbe, knowledve, knowledgfe, knowledgte, knowledgye, knowledghe, knowledgbe, knowledgve, knowledgwe, knowledg3e, knowledg4e, knowledgre, knowledgse, knowledgde, knowledgw, knowledg3, knowledg4, knowledgr, knowledgs, knowledgd, knowledgew, knowledge3, knowledge4, knowledger, knowledges, knowledged.

Other Usage Examples

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but a little want of knowledge is also a dangerous thing.

A jazz musician can improvise based on his knowledge of music. He understands how things go together. For a chef, once you have that basis, that's when cuisine is truly exciting.

A great many things which in times of lesser knowledge we imagined to be superstitious or useless, prove today on examination to have been of immense value to mankind.

A complacent satisfaction with present knowledge is the chief bar to the pursuit of knowledge.

A fact must be assimilated with, or discriminated fromm, some other fact or facts, in order to be raised to the dignity of a truth, and made to convey the least knowledge to the mind.

A good government implies two things first, fidelity to the objects of the government secondly, a knowledge of the means, by which those objects can be best attained.

A knowledge of the forces that rule society, of the causes that have produced its upheavals, and of society's resources for promoting healthy progress has become of vital concern to our civilization.

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