inn

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[Inn]

An inn is a place to stay while you're on vacation or on the road. Inns are usually smaller and more charming than hotels, but they serve the same purpose: to give you a place to rest your weary head as you travel.

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A place of shelter; hence, dwelling; habitation; residence; abode.

Noun
a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers


n.
A place of shelter; hence, dwelling; habitation; residence; abode.

n.
A house for the lodging and entertainment of travelers or wayfarers; a tavern; a public house; a hotel.

n.
The town residence of a nobleman or distinguished person; as, Leicester Inn.

n.
One of the colleges (societies or buildings) in London, for students of the law barristers; as, the Inns of Court; the Inns of Chancery; Serjeants' Inns.

v. i.
To take lodging; to lodge.

v. t.
To house; to lodge.

v. t.
To get in; to in. See In, v. t.


Inn

Inn , n. [AS. in,inn, house, chamber, inn, from AS. in in; akin to Icel. inni house. See In.] 1. A place of shelter; hence, dwelling; habitation; residence; abode. [Obs.] Chaucer.
Therefore with me ye may take up your inn For this same night.
2. A house for the lodging and entertainment of travelers or wayfarers; a tavern; a public house; a hotel. &hand; As distinguished from a private boarding house, an inn is a house for the entertainment of all travelers of good conduct and means of payment,as guests for a brief period,not as lodgers or boarders by contract.
The miserable fare and miserable lodgment of a provincial inn.
3. The town residence of a nobleman or distinguished person; as, Leicester Inn. [Eng.] 4. One of the colleges (societies or buildings) in London, for students of the law barristers; as, the Inns of Court; the Inns of Chancery; Serjeants' Inns. Inns of chancery (Eng.), colleges in which young students formerly began their law studies, now occupied chiefly by attorneys, solicitors, etc. -- Inns of court (Eng.), the four societies of "students and practicers of the law of England" which in London exercise the exclusive right of admitting persons to practice at the bar; also, the buildings in which the law students and barristers have their chambers. They are the Inner Temple, the Middle Temple, Lincoln's Inn, and Gray's Inn.

Inn

Inn , v. i. [imp. & p. p. Inned ; p. pr. & vb. n. Inning.] To take lodging; to lodge. [R.] Addison.

Inn

Inn, v. t. 1. To house; to lodge. [Obs.]
When he had brought them into his city And inned them, everich at his degree.
2. To get in; to in. See In, v. t.

A place of shelter; hence, dwelling; habitation; residence; abode.

To house; to lodge.

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Usage Examples

Japan is the most intoxicating place for me. In Kyoto, there's an inn called the Tawaraya which is quite extraordinary. The Japanese culture fascinates me: the food, the dress, the manners and the traditions. It's the travel experience that has moved me the most.

Misspelled Form

inn, uinn, 8inn, 9inn, oinn, jinn, kinn, unn, 8nn, 9nn, onn, jnn, knn, iunn, i8nn, i9nn, ionn, ijnn, iknn, ibnn, ihnn, ijnn, imnn, i nn, ibn, ihn, ijn, imn, i n, inbn, inhn, injn, inmn, in n, inbn, inhn, injn, inmn, in n, inb, inh, inj, inm, in , innb, innh, innj, innm, inn .

Other Usage Examples

There is no private house in which people can enjoy themselves so well as at a capital tavern... No, Sir there is nothing which has yet been contrived by man by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn.

The repose of sleep refreshes only the body. It rarely sets the soul at rest. The repose of the night does not belong to us. It is not the possession of our being. Sleep opens within us an inn for phantoms. In the morning we must sweep out the shadows.

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