ill

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[Ill]

If you're ill, you're unwell, or sick. Being ill is a good excuse for missing work or school.

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Contrary to good, in a physical sense; contrary or opposed to advantage, happiness, etc.; bad; evil; unfortunate; disagreeable; unfavorable.

Noun
an often persistent bodily disorder or disease; a cause for complaining

Adjective S.
presaging ill-fortune; "ill omens"; "ill predictions"; "my words with inauspicious thunderings shook heaven"- P.B.Shelley; "a dead and ominous silence prevailed"; "a by-election at a time highly unpropitious for the Government"

Adjective S.
distressing; "ill manners"; "of ill repute"

Adjective S.
resulting in suffering or adversity; "ill effects"; "it''s an ill wind that blows no good"

Adjective S.
indicating hostility or enmity; "you certainly did me an ill turn"; "ill feelings"; "ill will"

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Adjective
not in good physical or mental health; "ill from the monotony of his suffering"

Adverb
(`ill'' is often used as a combining form) in a poor or improper or unsatisfactory manner; not well; "he was ill prepared"; "it ill befits a man to betray old friends"; "the car runs badly"; "he performed badly on the exam"; "the team played poorly"; "ill

Adverb
with difficulty or inconvenience; scarcely or hardly; "we can ill afford to buy a new car just now"

Adverb
unfavorably or with disapproval; "tried not to speak ill of the dead"; "thought badly of him for his lack of concern"


a.
Contrary to good, in a physical sense; contrary or opposed to advantage, happiness, etc.; bad; evil; unfortunate; disagreeable; unfavorable.

a.
Contrary to good, in a moral sense; evil; wicked; wrong; iniquitious; naughtly; bad; improper.

a.
Sick; indisposed; unwell; diseased; disordered; as, ill of a fever.

a.
Not according with rule, fitness, or propriety; incorrect; rude; unpolished; inelegant.

n.
Whatever annoys or impairs happiness, or prevents success; evil of any kind; misfortune; calamity; disease; pain; as, the ills of humanity.

n.
Whatever is contrary to good, in a moral sense; wickedness; depravity; iniquity; wrong; evil.

adv.
In a ill manner; badly; weakly.


Ill

Ill , a. [The regular comparative and superlative are wanting, their places being supplied by worse and worst , from another root.] [OE. ill, ille, Icel. illr; akin to Sw. illa, adv., Dan. ilde, adv.] 1. Contrary to good, in a physical sense; contrary or opposed to advantage, happiness, etc.; bad; evil; unfortunate; disagreeable; unfavorable.
Neither is it ill air only that maketh an ill seat, but ill ways, ill markets, and ill neighbors.
There 's some ill planet reigns.
2. Contrary to good, in a moral sense; evil; wicked; wrong; iniquitious; naughtly; bad; improper.
Of his own body he was ill, and gave The clergy ill example.
3. Sick; indisposed; unwell; diseased; disordered; as, ill of a fever.
I am in health, I breathe, and see thee ill.
4. Not according with rule, fitness, or propriety; incorrect; rude; unpolished; inelegant.
That 's an ill phrase.
Ill at ease, uneasy; uncomfortable; anxious. "I am very ill at ease." Shak. -- Ill blood, enmity; resentment. -- Ill breeding, want of good breeding; rudeness. -- Ill fame, ill or bad repute; as, a house of ill fame, a house where lewd persons meet for illicit intercourse. -- Ill humor, a disagreeable mood; bad temper. -- Ill nature, bad disposition or temperament; sullenness; esp., a disposition to cause unhappiness to others. -- Ill temper, anger; moroseness; crossness. -- Ill turn. (a) An unkind act. (b) A slight attack of illness. [Colloq. U.S.] -- Ill will, unkindness; enmity; malevolence. Syn. -- Bad; evil; wrong; wicked; sick; unwell.

Ill

Ill , n. 1. Whatever annoys or impairs happiness, or prevents success; evil of any kind; misfortune; calamity; disease; pain; as, the ills of humanity.
Who can all sense of others' ills escape Is but a brute at best in human shape.
That makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of.
2. Whatever is contrary to good, in a moral sense; wickedness; depravity; iniquity; wrong; evil.
Strong virtue, like strong nature, struggles still, Exerts itself, and then throws off the ill.

Ill

Ill, adv. In a ill manner; badly; weakly.
How ill this taper burns!
Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, Where wealth accumulates and men decay.
&hand; Ill, like above, well, and so, is used before many participal adjectives, in its usual adverbal sense. When the two words are used as an epithet preceding the noun qualified they are commonly hyphened; in other cases they are written separatively; as, an ill-educated man; he was ill educated; an ill-formed plan; the plan, however ill formed, was acceptable. Ao, also, the following: ill-affected or ill affected, ill-arranged or ill arranged, ill-assorted or ill assorted, ill-boding or ill boding, ill-bred or ill bred, ill-conditioned, ill-conducted, ill-considered, ill-devised, ill-disposed, ill-doing, ill-fairing, ill-fated, ill-favored, ill-featured, ill-formed, ill-gotten, ill-imagined, ill-judged, ill-looking, ill-mannered, ill-matched, ill-meaning, ill-minded, ill-natured, ill-omened, ill-proportioned, ill-provided, ill-required, ill-sorted, ill-starred, ill-tempered, ill-timed, ill-trained, ill-used, and the like.

Contrary to good, in a physical sense; contrary or opposed to advantage, happiness, etc.; bad; evil; unfortunate; disagreeable; unfavorable.

In a ill manner; badly; weakly.

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Usage Examples

As far as I was concerned, the Depression was an ill wind that blew some good. If it hadn't occurred, my parents would have given me my college education. As it was, I had to scrabble for it.

It's commonly said that people who've been ill in childhood and who've had an upset education never really regret that they do. It means that you don't look at the world in the way that other people do, and if you were inclined to be a writer, that's a help.

He that hopes no good fears no ill.

Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom and a great empire and little minds go ill together.

Cynicism is humor in ill health.

Disease and ill health are caused largely by damage at the molecular and cellular level, yet today's surgical tools are too large to deal with that kind of problem.

I believe that music in itself heals and that everything is about the power of the mind. I thought if you are happy, you don't get ill. Your health is in your head. When you are satisfied with your work, you don't get ill.

Man becomes weak or ill by accident as a consequence of the lack of resources. Even the most severally ill patients must be treated with the aim of restoring their health.

Misspelled Form

ill, uill, 8ill, 9ill, oill, jill, kill, ull, 8ll, 9ll, oll, jll, kll, iull, i8ll, i9ll, ioll, ijll, ikll, ikll, ioll, ipll, i:ll, ikl, iol, ipl, i:l, ilkl, ilol, ilpl, il:l, ilkl, ilol, ilpl, il:l, ilk, ilo, ilp, il:, illk, illo, illp, ill:.

Other Usage Examples

Hope of ill gain is the beginning of loss.

Married people should not be quick to hear what is said by either when in ill humor.

Entire ignorance is not so terrible or extreme an evil, and is far from being the greatest of all too much cleverness and too much learning, accompanied with ill bringing-up, are far more fatal.

Books and marriage go ill together.

Consider this: I can go to Antarctica and get cash from an ATM without a glitch, but should I fall ill during my travels, a hospital there could not access my medical records or know what medications I am on.

I am certain no one sets out to be cruel, but our treatment of the elderly ill seems to have no philosophy to it. As a society, we should establish whether we have a policy of life at any cost.

Golf is a game in which one endeavors to control a ball with implements ill adapted for the purpose.

If we as a nation are to break the cycle of poverty, crime and the growing underclass of young people ill equipped to be productive citizens, we need to not only implement effective programs to prevent teen pregnancy, but we must also help those who have already given birth so that they become effective, nurturing, bonding parents.

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