flag

...
[Flag]

A flag is a piece of cloth that represents a country, group, or institution. If you're particularly proud of your Irish heritage, you might fly an Irish flag in your front yard.

...

To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.

Noun
a conspicuously marked or shaped tail

Noun
emblem usually consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth of distinctive design

Noun
stratified stone that splits into pieces suitable as paving stones

Noun
flagpole used to mark the position of the hole on a golf green

Noun
a listing printed in all issues of a newspaper or magazine (usually on the editorial page) that gives the name of the publication and the names of the editorial staff, etc.

...

Noun
a rectangular piece of fabric used as a signalling device

Noun
plants with sword-shaped leaves and erect stalks bearing bright-colored flowers composed of three petals and three drooping sepals

Verb
become less intense

Verb
provide with a flag; "Flag this file so that I can recognize it immediately"

Verb
communicate or signal with a flag

Verb
decorate with flags; "the building was flagged for the holiday"

Verb
droop, sink, or settle from or as if from pressure or loss of tautness


v. i.
To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.

v. i.
To droop; to grow spiritless; to lose vigor; to languish; as, the spirits flag; the streugth flags.

v. t.
To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness; as, to flag the wings.

v. t.
To enervate; to exhaust the vigor or elasticity of.

n.
That which flags or hangs down loosely.

n.
A cloth usually bearing a device or devices and used to indicate nationality, party, etc., or to give or ask information; -- commonly attached to a staff to be waved by the wind; a standard; a banner; an ensign; the colors; as, the national flag; a military or a naval flag.

n.
A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of certain hawks, owls, etc.

n.
A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks.

n.
The bushy tail of a dog, as of a setter.

v. t.
To signal to with a flag; as, to flag a train.

v. t.
To convey, as a message, by means of flag signals; as, to flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance.

n.
An aquatic plant, with long, ensiform leaves, belonging to either of the genera Iris and Acorus.

v. t.
To furnish or deck out with flags.

n.
A flat stone used for paving.

n.
Any hard, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers suitable for flagstones.

v. t.
To lay with flags of flat stones.


Flag

Flag , v. i. [imp. & p. p. Flagged ; p. pr. & vb. n. Flagging .] [Cf. Icel. flaka to droop, hang loosely. Cf. Flacker, Flag an ensign.] 1. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.
As loose it [the sail] flagged around the mast.
2. To droop; to grow spiritless; to lose vigor; to languish; as, the spirits flag; the streugth flags.
The pleasures of the town begin to flag.
Syn. -- To droop; decline; fail; languish; pine.

Flag

Flag , v. t. 1. To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness; as, to flag the wings. prior. 2. To enervate; to exhaust the vigor or elasticity of.
Nothing so flags the spirits.

Flag

Flag, n. [Cf. LG. & G. flagge, Sw. flagg, Dan. flag, D. vlag. See Flag to hang loose.] 1. That which flags or hangs down loosely. 2. A cloth usually bearing a device or devices and used to indicate nationality, party, etc., or to give or ask information; -- commonly attached to a staff to be waved by the wind; a standard; a banner; an ensign; the colors; as, the national flag; a military or a naval flag. 3. (Zo'94l.) (a) A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of certain hawks, owls, etc. (b) A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks. (c) The bushy tail of a dog, as of a setter. Black flag. See under Black. -- Flag captain, Flag leutenant, etc., special officers attached to the flagship, as aids to the flag officer. -- Flag officer, the commander of a fleet or squadron; an admiral, or commodore. -- Flag of truse, a white flag carried or displayed to an enemy, as an invitation to conference, or for the purpose of making some communication not hostile. -- Flag share, the flag officer's share of prize money. -- Flag station (Railroad), a station at which trains do not stop unless signaled to do so, by a flag hung out or waved. -- National flag, a flag of a particular country, on which some national emblem or device, is emblazoned. -- Red flag, a flag of a red color, displayed as a signal of danger or token of defiance; the emblem of anarchists. -- To dip, the flag, to mlower it and quickly restore it to its place; -- done as a mark of respect. -- To hang out the white flag, to ask truce or quarter, or, in some cases, to manifest a friendly design by exhibiting a white flag. -- To hang the flag half-mast high ∨ half-staff, to raise it only half way to the mast or staff, as a token or sign of mourning. -- To strike, ∨ lower, the flag, to haul it down, in token of respect, submission, or, in an engagement, of surrender. -- Yellow flag, the quarantine flag of all nations; also carried at a vessel's fore, to denote that an infectious disease is on board.

Flag

Flag, v. t. [From Flag an ensign.] 1. To signal to with a flag; as, to flag a train. 2. To convey, as a message, by means of flag signals; as, to flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance.

Flag

Flag, n. [From Flag to hang loose, to bend down.] (Bot.) An aquatic plant, with long, ensiform leaves, belonging to either of the genera Iris and Acorus. Cooper's flag, the cat-tail (Typha latifolia), the long leaves of which are placed between the staves of barrels to make the latter water-tight. -- Corn flag. See under 2d Corn. -- Flag broom, a coarse of broom, originally made of flags or rushes. -- Flag root, the root of the sweet flag. -- Sweet flag. See Calamus, n., 2.

Flag

Flag, v. t. To furnish or deck out with flags.

Flag

Flag, n. [Icel. flaga, cf. Icel. flag spot where a turf has been cut out, and E. flake layer, scale. Cf. Floe.] 1. A flat stone used for paving. Woodward. 2. (Geol.) Any hard, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers suitable for flagstones.

Flag

Flag, v. t. To lay with flags of flat stones.
The sides and floor are all flagged with . . . marble.

To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.

To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness; as, to flag the wings.

That which flags or hangs down loosely.

To signal to with a flag; as, to flag a train.

An aquatic plant, with long, ensiform leaves, belonging to either of the genera Iris and Acorus.

To furnish or deck out with flags.

A flat stone used for paving.

To lay with flags of flat stones.

...

Usage Examples

I'm proud of the U.S.A. We've done some amazing things. To wear our flag in the Olympics is an honor.

I feel there should have been some recognition of the Spice Girls at this year's 25th anniversary. We flew the flag for Britain around the globe in the 1990s and we achieved a hell of a lot.

The American flag is an enduring symbol of liberty, democracy, and justice. It is fitting that the House act to protect it as we approach our nation's birthday, and as our men and women in uniform rally behind it in Iraq's battlefields.

Martin Luther King, Jr. didn't carry just a piece of cloth to symbolize his belief in racial equality he carried the American flag.

The Royal family to me are not England, and they are not the flag.

Bastard Freedom waves Her fustian flag in mockery over slaves.

I believe our flag is more than just cloth and ink. It is a universally recognized symbol that stands for liberty, and freedom. It is the history of our nation, and it's marked by the blood of those who died defending it.

Freedom of religion is a principle that is central to our Nation's Declaration of Independence. Congress has taken this positive step to protect our freedom to express allegiance to America's flag and the ideals it represents.

Misspelled Form

flag, dflag, rflag, tflag, gflag, vflag, cflag, dlag, rlag, tlag, glag, vlag, clag, fdlag, frlag, ftlag, fglag, fvlag, fclag, fklag, folag, fplag, f:lag, fkag, foag, fpag, f:ag, flkag, floag, flpag, fl:ag, flqag, flwag, flsag, flzag, flqg, flwg, flsg, flzg, flaqg, flawg, flasg, flazg, flafg, flatg, flayg, flahg, flabg, flavg, flaf, flat, flay, flah, flab, flav, flagf, flagt, flagy, flagh, flagb, flagv.

Other Usage Examples

Nowhere else in history has there ever been a flag that stands for the right to burn itself. This is the fractal of our flag. It stands for the right to destroy itself.

Our flag honors those who have fought to protect it, and is a reminder of the sacrifice of our nation's founders and heroes. As the ultimate icon of America's storied history, the Stars and Stripes represents the very best of this nation.

In a few days an officer came to our camp, under a flag of truce, and informed Hamilton, then a captain of artillery, but afterwards the aid of General Washington, that Captain Hale had been arrested within the British lines condemned as a spy, and executed that morning.

Obama has been attacked repeatedly for not wearing a flag pin, with Republicans claiming that his patriotism is in question. It's all a bit silly.

To survive in peace and harmony, united and strong, we must have one people, one nation, one flag.

I take any opportunity I can to raise our country's flag really high and get some shining positive light on things over there.

What I'm trying to do is to at least raise a flag to the blinding light of technology.

There is a strong tendency in the United States to rally round the flag and their troops, no matter how mistaken the war.

Comments


Browse Dictionary