excite

[ex┬Ěcite]

To excite is to stimulate, animate, or energize. The return of your favorite TV show might excite you, and winning millions of dollars in the lottery will definitely excite you.

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To call to activity in any way; to rouse to feeling; to kindle to passionate emotion; to stir up to combined or general activity; as, to excite a person, the spirits, the passions; to excite a mutiny or insurrection; to excite heat by friction.

Verb
act as a stimulant; "The book stimulated her imagination"; "This play stimulates"

Verb
produce a magnetic field in; "excite the neurons"

Verb
raise to a higher energy level; "excite the atoms"

Verb
stir the feelings, emotions, or peace of; "These stories shook the community"; "the civil war shook the country"

Verb
stimulate sexually; "This movie usually arouses the male audience"

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Verb
cause to be agitated, excited, or roused; "The speaker charged up the crowd with his inflammatory remarks"

Verb
arouse or elicit a feeling

Verb
stir feelings in; "stimulate my appetite"; "excite the audience"; "stir emotions"


v. t.
To call to activity in any way; to rouse to feeling; to kindle to passionate emotion; to stir up to combined or general activity; as, to excite a person, the spirits, the passions; to excite a mutiny or insurrection; to excite heat by friction.

v. t.
To call forth or increase the vital activity of an organism, or any of its parts.


Excite

Ex*cite" , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Excited; p. pr. & vb. n. exciting.] [L. excitare; ex out + citare to move rapidly, to rouse: cf. OF. esciter, exciter, F. exciter. See Cite.] 1. To call to activity in any way; to rouse to feeling; to kindle to passionate emotion; to stir up to combined or general activity; as, to excite a person, the spirits, the passions; to excite a mutiny or insurrection; to excite heat by friction. 2. (Physiol.) To call forth or increase the vital activity of an organism, or any of its parts. Syn. -- To incite; awaken; animate; rouse or arouse; stimulate; inflame; irritate; provoke. -- To Excite, Incite. When we excite we rouse into action feelings which were less strong; when we incite we spur on or urge forward to a specific act or end. Demosthenes excited the passions of the Athenians against Philip, and thus incited the whole nation to unite in the war against him. Antony, by his speech over the body of C'91sar, so excited the feelings of the populace, that Brutus and his companions were compelled to flee from Rome; many however, were incited to join their standard, not only by love of liberty, but hopes of plunder.

To call to activity in any way; to rouse to feeling; to kindle to passionate emotion; to stir up to combined or general activity; as, to excite a person, the spirits, the passions; to excite a mutiny or insurrection; to excite heat by friction.

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Usage Examples

Forbidden pleasures alone are loved immoderately when lawful, they do not excite desire.

I have experienced some amazing food! Yet when I think about the most luxurious and exquisite meals I have had, visions of simple food made from a few natural ingredients are what most excite me.

The design of Rhetoric is to remove those Prejudices that lie in the way of Truth, to Reduce the Passions to the Government of Reasons to place our Subject in a Right Light, and excite our Hearers to a due consideration of it.

Family involvement is a valuable thing and playing together actively can be the '90s version of it. Instead of just watching, you can do it together... something we don't spend enough time on. We can motivate and excite each other about fitness.

If a secret history of books could be written, and the author's private thoughts and meanings noted down alongside of his story, how many insipid volumes would become interesting, and dull tales excite the reader!

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

When it comes down to it, it's giving people a good night out in a basic way and I think my company guarantees that. There's always something new and something to excite us and surprise us, and that's why people come back, I hope.

Poetry is that art which selects and arranges the symbols of thought in such a manner as to excite the imagination the most powerfully and delightfully.

It's a great mistake, I think, to put children off with falsehoods and nonsense, when their growing powers of observation and discrimination excite in them a desire to know about things.

By common consent gray hairs are a crown of glory the only object of respect that can never excite envy.

Socialism appeals to better classes and has far more strength. Attack the state and you excite feelings of loyalty even among the disaffected classes but attack the industrial system and appeal to the state, and you may have loyalty in your favor.

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