essence

[Es┬Ěsence]

Essence is whatever most sums up the heart and soul of something, its truest most indispensable qualities. The essence of Las Vegas is poker chips and dreams; the essence of Johnny Cash is black clothing and country music.

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The constituent elementary notions which constitute a complex notion, and must be enumerated to define it; sometimes called the nominal essence.

Noun
a toiletry that emits and diffuses a fragrant odor

Noun
the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience; "the gist of the prosecutor''s argument"; "the heart and soul of the Republican Party"; "the nub of the story"

Noun
the central meaning or theme of a speech or literary work

Noun
any substance possessing to a high degree the predominant properties of a plant or drug or other natural product from which it is extracted


n.
The constituent elementary notions which constitute a complex notion, and must be enumerated to define it; sometimes called the nominal essence.

n.
The constituent quality or qualities which belong to any object, or class of objects, or on which they depend for being what they are (distinguished as real essence); the real being, divested of all logical accidents; that quality which constitutes or marks the true nature of anything; distinctive character; hence, virtue or quality of a thing, separated from its grosser parts.

n.
Constituent substance.

n.
A being; esp., a purely spiritual being.

n.
The predominant qualities or virtues of a plant or drug, extracted and refined from grosser matter; or, more strictly, the solution in spirits of wine of a volatile or essential oil; as, the essence of mint, and the like.

n.
Perfume; odor; scent; or the volatile matter constituting perfume.

v. t.
To perfume; to scent.


Essence

Es"sence , n. [F. essence, L. essentia, formed as if fr. a p. pr. of esse to be. See Is, and cf. Entity.] 1. The constituent elementary notions which constitute a complex notion, and must be enumerated to define it; sometimes called the nominal essence. 2. The constituent quality or qualities which belong to any object, or class of objects, or on which they depend for being what they are (distinguished as real essence); the real being, divested of all logical accidents; that quality which constitutes or marks the true nature of anything; distinctive character; hence, virtue or quality of a thing, separated from its grosser parts.
The laws are at present, both in form and essence, the greatest curse that society labors under.
Gifts and alms are the expressions, not the essence of this virtue [charity].
The essence of Addison's humor is irony.
3. Constituent substance.
And uncompounded is their essence pure.
4. A being; esp., a purely spiritual being.
As far as gods and heavenly essences Can perish.
He had been indulging in fanciful speculations on spiritual essences, until . . . he had and ideal world of his own around him.
5. The predominant qualities or virtues of a plant or drug, extracted and refined from grosser matter; or, more strictly, the solution in spirits of wine of a volatile or essential oil; as, the essence of mint, and the like.
The . . . word essence . . . scarcely underwent a more complete transformation when from being the abstract of the verb "to be," it came to denote something sufficiently concrete to be inclosed in a glass bottle.
6. Perfume; odor; scent; or the volatile matter constituting perfume.
Nor let the essences exhale.

Essence

Es"sence, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Essenced ; p. pr. & vb. n. Essencing .] To perfume; to scent. "Essenced fops." Addison.

The constituent elementary notions which constitute a complex notion, and must be enumerated to define it; sometimes called the nominal essence.

To perfume; to scent.

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Usage Examples

Battle is the most magnificent competition in which a human being can indulge. It brings out all that is best it removes all that is base. All men are afraid in battle. The coward is the one who lets his fear overcome his sense of duty. Duty is the essence of manhood.

Freedom. Freedom of religion. Freedom to speak their mind. Freedom to build a life. And yes, freedom to build a business. With their own hands. This is the essence of the American experience.

Design is the fundamental soul of a man-made creation that ends up expressing itself in successive outer layers of the product or service. The iMac is not just the color or translucence or the shape of the shell. The essence of the iMac is to be the finest possible consumer computer in which each element plays together.

Agriculture is now a motorized food industry, the same thing in its essence as the production of corpses in the gas chambers and the extermination camps, the same thing as blockades and the reduction of countries to famine, the same thing as the manufacture of hydrogen bombs.

Freedom of expression - in particular, freedom of the press - guarantees popular participation in the decisions and actions of government, and popular participation is the essence of our democracy.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.

But the ability to articulate what you are doing, to be clear about it, and to stick to it is, I think, the essence of political leadership.

Acting is not about dressing up. Acting is about stripping bare. The whole essence of learning lines is to forget them so you can make them sound like you thought of them that instant.

Another very strong image from the first day was giving my initial press conference in the morning - going down and finding out that everything I had said, the essence of what I had said, was wrong.

Every society and religion has rules, for both have moral laws. And the essence of morality consists, as in art, of drawing the line somewhere.

Cruel persecutions and intolerance are not accidents, but grow out of the very essence of religion, namely, its absolute claims.

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