english

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[Eng·lish]

Things pertaining to the land or culture of England are referred to as being English. This includes the people of England as well as the language spoken there, which was brought to the American colonies by the English explorers.

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Of or pertaining to England, or to its inhabitants, or to the present so-called Anglo-Saxon race.

Noun
the discipline that studies the English language and literature

Noun
an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the Commonwealth countries

Noun
(sports) the spin given to a ball by striking it on one side or releasing it with a sharp twist

Noun
the people of England

Adjective
of or relating to or characteristic of England or its culture; "English history"; "the English landed aristocracy"; "English literature"

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a.
Of or pertaining to England, or to its inhabitants, or to the present so-called Anglo-Saxon race.

a.
See 1st Bond, n., 8.

n.
Collectively, the people of England; English people or persons.

n.
The language of England or of the English nation, and of their descendants in America, India, and other countries.

n.
A kind of printing type, in size between Pica and Great Primer. See Type.

n.
A twist or spinning motion given to a ball in striking it that influences the direction it will take after touching a cushion or another ball.

v. t.
To translate into the English language; to Anglicize; hence, to interpret; to explain.

v. t.
To strike (the cue ball) in such a manner as to give it in addition to its forward motion a spinning motion, that influences its direction after impact on another ball or the cushion.


English

Eng"lish , a. [AS. Englisc, fr. Engle, Angle, Engles, Angles, a tribe of Germans from the southeast of Sleswick, in Denmark, who settled in Britain and gave it the name of England. Cf. Anglican.] Of or pertaining to England, or to its inhabitants, or to the present so-called Anglo-Saxon race. English bond (Arch.) See 1st Bond, n., 8. -- English breakfast tea. See Congou. -- English horn. (Mus.) See Corno Inglese. -- English walnut. (Bot.) See under Walnut.

English

Eng"lish, n. 1. Collectively, the people of England; English people or persons. 2. The language of England or of the English nation, and of their descendants in America, India, and other countries. &hand; The English language has been variously divided into periods by different writers. In the division most commonly recognized, the first period dates from about 450 to 1150. This is the period of full inflection, and is called Anglo-Saxon, or, by many recent writers, Old English. The second period dates from about 1150 to 1550 (or, if four periods be recognized, from about 1150 to 1350), and is called Early English, Middle English, or more commonly (as in the usage of this book), Old English. During this period most of the inflections were dropped, and there was a great addition of French words to the language. The third period extends from about 1350 to 1550, and is Middle English. During this period orthography became comparatively fixed. The last period, from about 1550, is called Modern English. 3. A kind of printing type, in size between Pica and Great Primer. See Type. The type called English. 4. (Billiards) A twist or spinning motion given to a ball in striking it that influences the direction it will take after touching a cushion or another ball. The King's, ∨ Queen's, English. See under King.

English

Eng"lish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Englished ; p. pr. & vb. n. Englishing.] 1. To translate into the English language; to Anglicize; hence, to interpret; to explain.
Those gracious acts . . . may be Englished more properly, acts of fear and dissimulation.
Caxton does not care to alter the French forms and words in the book which he was Englishing.
2. (Billiards) To strike (the cue ball) in such a manner as to give it in addition to its forward motion a spinning motion, that influences its direction after impact on another ball or the cushion. [U.S.]

Of or pertaining to England, or to its inhabitants, or to the present so-called Anglo-Saxon race.

Collectively, the people of England; English people or persons.

To translate into the English language; to Anglicize; hence, to interpret; to explain.

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Usage Examples

English people don't have very good diction. In France you have to pronounce very particularly and clearly, and learning French at an early age helped me enormously.

Between 1910 and 1950 approximately 350 lives of Jesus were published in the English language alone.

Damien Hirst is the Elvis of the English art world, its ayatollah, deliverer, and big-thinking entrepreneurial potty-mouthed prophet and front man. Hirst synthesizes punk, Pop Art, Jeff Koons, Marcel Duchamp, Francis Bacon, and Catholicism.

English is taking over the world. I just wrote a piece about it. And it's not by design. The United States dominates because it's the biggest market.

Dreams do come true, even for someone who couldn't speak English and never had a music lesson or much of an education.

At last, in 1611, was made, under the auspices of King James, the famous King James version and this is the great literary monument of the English language.

Drawing on my fine command of the English language, I said nothing.

Both my parents are English and came out to Australia in 1967. I was born the following year. My parents, and immigrants like them, were known as '£10 poms.' Back then, the Australian government was trying to get educated British people and Canadians - to be honest, educated white people - to come and live in Australia.

Misspelled Form

english, wenglish, 3english, 4english, renglish, senglish, denglish, wnglish, 3nglish, 4nglish, rnglish, snglish, dnglish, ewnglish, e3nglish, e4nglish, ernglish, esnglish, ednglish, ebnglish, ehnglish, ejnglish, emnglish, e nglish, ebglish, ehglish, ejglish, emglish, e glish, enbglish, enhglish, enjglish, enmglish, en glish, enfglish, entglish, enyglish, enhglish, enbglish, envglish, enflish, entlish, enylish, enhlish, enblish, envlish, engflish, engtlish, engylish, enghlish, engblish, engvlish, engklish, engolish, engplish, eng:lish, engkish, engoish, engpish, eng:ish, englkish, engloish, englpish, engl:ish, engluish, engl8ish, engl9ish, engloish, engljish, englkish, englush, engl8sh, engl9sh, englosh, engljsh, englksh, engliush, engli8sh, engli9sh, engliosh, englijsh, engliksh, engliash, engliwsh, engliesh, englidsh, englixsh, englizsh, engliah, engliwh, englieh, englidh, englixh, englizh, englisah, engliswh, engliseh, englisdh, englisxh, engliszh, englisgh, englisyh, englisuh, englisjh, englisnh, englisg, englisy, englisu, englisj, englisn, englishg, englishy, englishu, englishj, englishn.

Other Usage Examples

English girls' schools today providing the higher education are, so far as my knowledge goes, worthily representative of that astonishing rise in the intellectual standards of women which has taken place in the last half-century.

English culture is basically homosexual in the sense that the men only really care about other men.

English majors understand human nature better than economists do.

Ah, the bond between English boys and California girls. For those of us who aren't either, it's a bond that fascinates and mystifies. So much of the world's favorite music comes out of that relationship.

English is necessary as at present original works of science are in English. I believe that in two decades times original works of science will start coming out in our languages. Then we can move over like the Japanese.

All hockey players are bilingual. They know English and profanity.

A friend of mine said, no matter what I do I always look like an English teacher. She actually said, you still look like a Campbell's Soup kid.

An English man does not travel to see English men.

Apart from a few simple principles, the sound and rhythm of English prose seem to me matters where both writers and readers should trust not so much to rules as to their ears.

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