distress

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[dis┬Ětress]

If you are in distress, you are in trouble. You're hurting either physically or mentally.

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Extreme pain or suffering; anguish of body or mind; as, to suffer distress from the gout, or from the loss of friends.

Noun
the seizure and holding of property as security for payment of a debt or satisfaction of a claim; "Originally distress was a landloard''s remedy against a tenant for unpaid rents or property damage but now the landlord is given a landlord''s lien"

Noun
psychological suffering; "the death of his wife caused him great distress"

Noun
extreme physical pain; "the patient appeared to be in distress"

Noun
a state of adversity (danger or affliction or need); "a ship in distress"; "she was the classic maiden in distress"

Verb
cause mental pain to; "The news of her child''s illness distressed the mother"

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n.
Extreme pain or suffering; anguish of body or mind; as, to suffer distress from the gout, or from the loss of friends.

n.
That which occasions suffering; painful situation; misfortune; affliction; misery.

n.
A state of danger or necessity; as, a ship in distress, from leaking, loss of spars, want of provisions or water, etc.

n.
The act of distraining; the taking of a personal chattel out of the possession of a wrongdoer, by way of pledge for redress of an injury, or for the performance of a duty, as for nonpayment of rent or taxes, or for injury done by cattle, etc.

n.
The thing taken by distraining; that which is seized to procure satisfaction.

n.
To cause pain or anguish to; to pain; to oppress with calamity; to afflict; to harass; to make miserable.

n.
To compel by pain or suffering.

n.
To seize for debt; to distrain.


Distress

Dis*tress" , n. [OE. destresse, distresse, OF. destresse, destrece, F. d'82tresse, OF. destrecier to distress, (assumed) LL. districtiare, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere. See Distrain, and cf. Stress.] 1. Extreme pain or suffering; anguish of body or mind; as, to suffer distress from the gout, or from the loss of friends.
Not fearing death nor shrinking for distress.
2. That which occasions suffering; painful situation; misfortune; affliction; misery.
Affliction's sons are brothers in distress.
3. A state of danger or necessity; as, a ship in distress, from leaking, loss of spars, want of provisions or water, etc. 4. (Law) (a) The act of distraining; the taking of a personal chattel out of the possession of a wrongdoer, by way of pledge for redress of an injury, or for the performance of a duty, as for nonpayment of rent or taxes, or for injury done by cattle, etc. (b) The thing taken by distraining; that which is seized to procure satisfaction. Bouvier. Kent. Burrill.
If he were not paid, he would straight go and take a distress of goods and cattle.
The distress thus taken must be proportioned to the thing distrained for.
Abuse of distress. (Law) See under Abuse. Syn. -- Affliction; suffering; pain; agony; misery; torment; anguish; grief; sorrow; calamity; misfortune; trouble; adversity. See Affliction.

Distress

Dis*tress", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Distressed ; p. pr. & vb. n. Distressing.] [Cf. OF. destrecier. See Distress, n.] 1. To cause pain or anguish to; to pain; to oppress with calamity; to afflict; to harass; to make miserable.
We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed.
2. To compel by pain or suffering.
Men who can neither be distressed nor won into a sacrifice of duty.
3. (Law) To seize for debt; to distrain. Syn. -- To pain; grieve; harass; trouble; perplex; afflict; worry; annoy.

Extreme pain or suffering; anguish of body or mind; as, to suffer distress from the gout, or from the loss of friends.

To cause pain or anguish to; to pain; to oppress with calamity; to afflict; to harass; to make miserable.

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Usage Examples

Without realizing it, the individual composes his life according to the laws of beauty even in times of greatest distress.

Beauty in distress is much the most affecting beauty.

I have never known any distress that an hour's reading did not relieve.

To pity distress is but human to relieve it is Godlike.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

By adversity are wrought the greatest works of admiration, and all the fair examples of renown, out of distress and misery are grown.

Gun crime is a major cause of fear and distress throughout the UK. The problem is deeply entrenched in a wide range of social and cultural factors and therefore not an isolated issue.

Nothing brings me more happiness than trying to help the most vulnerable people in society. It is a goal and an essential part of my life - a kind of destiny. Whoever is in distress can call on me. I will come running wherever they are.

Want of money and the distress of a thief can never be alleged as the cause of his thieving, for many honest people endure greater hardships with fortitude. We must therefore seek the cause elsewhere than in want of money, for that is the miser's passion, not the thief s.

All the perplexities, confusion and distress in America arise, not from defects in their Constitution or Confederation, not from want of honor or virtue, so much as from the downright ignorance of the nature of coin, credit and circulation.

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